And in that corner… the Michigan State Spartans

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It hasn’t exactly been a love affair between the Spartans of Michigan State and the Fighting Irish, yet a unique rivalry has been crafted between the two teams.

(Who else plays for a half blue/half white megaphone?)

As Michigan State prepares to come to Notre Dame Stadium this Saturday, we caught up with renowned Michigan State blogger LVS of the new Spartans website TheOnlyColors.com. He swears he has nothing to do with the flag planting incident.

Inside the Irish: Let’s get right to it: Why does Michigan State hate Notre Dame?

LVS: On a base level, the hate arises for the same reasons why many other college football fans
hate Notre Dame: perceived arrogance, disproportionate and unwarranted
national attention and influence, etc.  But it’s really the familiarity
that matters: our campuses are only two and a half hours apart, and we
play each other yearly, so contempt is only natural.  Furthermore, I
think some MSU fans sort of resent how Notre Dame-types give this game
relatively short shrift, even though we beat ND with greater regularity
than anyone not named Southern Cal.  Finally, you can’t underestimate
just how traumatic the 2006 game was for our collective psyche; winning
the last two years has barely started to heal that awful, awful night. 
Firing John L. Smith helped more.

It should be said that while there’s hate on a year-to-year basis,
any serious MSU fan also greatly appreciates the role ND played in the
development of our program.  When most big midwestern schools wouldn’t
play MSU (at that time, MAC/MSC), Notre Dame did, every year.  Those
games greatly legitimized our program and directly led toward MSU
joining the Big Ten.

ITI: This is an interesting rivalry from both team’s perspectives. Where would you slot this rivalry in for the Spartans? Is it a different kind than the rivalry with the Wolverines?

LVS: It’s definitely different than the Michigan game, and quite frankly not
as important to us.  Take the familiarity I just discussed, crank it up
by a factor of, oh, 15 or so, and that’s the Michigan rivalry.  We play
Notre Dame every year; not only do we play Michigan yearly, but many
our friends, family, neighbors, co-workers, etc. are Wolverines or
Wolverine fans.  Add in conference implications and state bragging
rights (at least when we don’t let Central into the picture . . . bleh)
and you end up with a big, big deal.

For most MSU fans, this is the second (or, if Ohio State’s on the schedule, sometimes the third) biggest game of the year.

ITI: What do you think the biggest key to MSU’s dominance at Notre Dame Stadium has been?

LVS: First, it isn’t a coincidence that all but one of the wins in the
streak have come against mediocre-to-bad Notre Dame teams (’07, 03,
’01, ’99, ’97).  Really, only the 2005 win was against an above-average
Irish squad.  (Of course, many of our teams during that time period
weren’t the greatest, either.)  Also, it doesn’t hurt that we’re
usually coming off of a relatively easy win the week before the ND game (usually!), while ND always plays an emotionally and physically draining game against Michigan right before facing us.

More directly, I think that at this point, our guys aren’t awestruck or intimidated by Notre Dame Stadium
as many other visiting players are.  Each of our players will play
there twice during their careers; the first time around, they’re
surrounded by upperclassmen who know nothing but winning in South Bend,
and the second time, they are those upperclassmen.

ITI: Obviously, we’re coming off pretty difficult losses. How much wind came out of the Spartan’s sails after losing to the Chippewas?

LVS: Oh, loooooots.  We simply played a terrible game: we couldn’t establish a consistent running attack, our defense couldn’t stop anything,
our pass rush was nonexistent, we took a bunch of inexcusable
penalties, and we lost in the epically inept manner of MSU teams past. 
We had all hoped that, after last season, we had left those sorts of
performances behind.  Simply: we anticipated being at least in the
discussion for the Big Ten title.  Championship contenders don’t lose
to MAC teams at home.  It’s a cold reality.

ITI: Can your defense stop the ND offense?

LVS: I doubt that we can stop ND’s offense, but I do think we’re
capable of slowing it down enough to win.  Remember, ND’s offense is
comprised of substantially the same players who could only score seven
points against us last season; those players are obviously more
experienced and better now, but even if you quadruple that output, I
still think we can score 31 points and win the game.

I wouldn’t read too much into last week; CMU runs the type of spread offense
we’ve historically been awful against.  ND has incredible receivers,
but I think our secondary is much better suited to defend against the
type of pro-style offense ND uses.  One thing which may be interesting:
MSU hasn’t faced a real running back yet this year.  Montana State more
or less abandoned the run after 10 minutes or so, and CMU’s screen
passing game essentially is their running game.  I expect our
rush defense to be better than average, but there’s no evidence to back
that up yet.  If there is a weakness there, Armando Allen is clearly
talented enough to exploit it.

ITI: Who should the Irish be scared of for the Spartans?

LVS: I think MSU can move the ball on Notre Dame, primarily through the air.  We
have two excellent receivers in Blair White – who is a walk-on, as you
may have heard – and B.J. Cunningham. White is one of the best
receivers in the Big Ten, and will work both from the slot and split
wide; coming into this season, many MSU fans were concerned about
Cunningham’s reliability, but he has been sure-handed and excellent
through the first two games.  Each has two touchdowns already this season.  The wide receiver corps will additionally given a boost if Mark Dell plays.  (He’s missed the first two games with a leg injury.)  Last
season, Dell was a bit inconsistent, but he’s tremendously athletic,
and the closest thing we have to a genuine gamebreaker.  We
also have three tight ends who are big threats in the passing game:
Charlie Gantt is the starter, Brian Linthicum is a Clemson transfer who
looked great in our first game and then was woefully underused
last week, and Dion Sims is a freshman, and an athletic freak in the
mold of recent MSU tight end Kellen Davis.

 

I’m confident in both of our sophomore quarterbacks, Kirk Cousins and Keith Nichol.  Briefly, Cousins is the pure passer of the two, while Nichol can pass, but is also a threat to scramble.  The
two have been rotating throughout the first two games (to our great
detriment in the CMU game, in my opinion), but Cousins is the team
captain and has been slightly more impressive in the first two games.  I’d expect the rotation to end and for Cousins to play the entire game unless something goes terribly wrong.

 

Conversely, Notre Dame shouldn’t be particularly worried about our running game.  Javon Ringer obviously killed the Irish last year, but he’s gone, and we’ve struggled so far to replace his output.  Two running backs – redshirt freshman Caulton Ray and true freshman Larry Caper – have separated themselves a bit from the pack; expect to see them both on Saturday.  But
the real problem has been our offensive line, which has two new
starters on the right side and has struggled mightily to create holes
for the backs.  Their play needs to improve, and soon, for MSU to be successful.

 

On
defense, ND should be worried about Greg Jones, our team’s best player
and the Big Ten preseason defensive player of the year.  He’s the best linebacker we’ve had in
East Lansing
in many, many years; he flies to the ball faster than almost anyone
else in college football, and is also a big threat on the blitz.

ITI: Did you have anything to do with the flag planting?

LVS: Ha.  My tuition helped pay John L. Smith’s salary, so I suppose I’m complicit in some way.  Honestly,
I think the entire episode was waaaaaay overblown, but I think I speak
for all MSU fans when I say that I’m very, very glad that unfortunate
era of Spartan football is dead and gone.

ITI: If you had to guess, what do you see happening this weekend?

LVS: Eesh.  Like I said, I think we can move the ball and score points on the Irish.  Tenuta
is an excellent defensive coordinator, but his default setting is
blitz, blitz, blitz, and stacking the box and bringing pressure really
isn’t the way to defend against us.  You really want to
clamp down in the secondary, and force us to beat you on the ground,
because we haven’t yet proven that we’re capable of doing that.

 

For me, this game will turn on how game-ready Michael Floyd is.  If
he’s healthy, we’re probably not going to be able to stop both he and
Golden Tate, and ND will get a couple long touchdown passes that will
make the difference.  If he’s still hurt, I think we can somewhat contain Tate, and slow down ND’s passing game just enough to win.  Ultimately,
though, I think our biggest problem is that our pass rush isn’t going
to bother Clausen at all, and with time in the pocket, he’s going to
pick us apart.  Another thing to watch is whether Clausen
and Allen are able to gouge our defense with screen passes; we looked
absolutely hopeless last week in defending screens.

 

Gun
to my head prediction: ND jumps out to an early lead, MSU fights back
to take the lead, but ND gets a late touchdown to win 31-27.  But I’ve picked ND to win this game at home many times now, and somehow we keep on escaping back to
East Lansing with the Megaphone, so you never know . . .

 

This is obviously an enormous game for both teams.  I’m really looking forward to being in South Bend for it.

ITI: If Dantonio doesn’t work out, do you think you guys have any interest in hiring proud MSU alumnus Ty Willingham?

LVS: Why would we need to hire him?  By doing more than anyone to run Notre Dame’s program into the ground, he’s already served his alma mater well.

Check out LVS and the rest of the crew at TheOnlyColors.com.


Irish A-to-Z: Jalen Elliott

Jalen Elliott Irish 247
Photo courtesy of Irish 247 / Tom Loy
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Don’t know Jalen Elliott yet? You will soon enough.

While the 3-star prospect didn’t land on any national lists of recruiting victories, Notre Dame’s coaching staff believes that they might have their next great strong safety on campus in the Virginia native.

While there are other prospects who are bigger, stronger and faster—and had better recruiting rankings and scholarship offers—Elliott stood out to the Irish staff when they got him on campus, turning Brian Kelly and company into major believers. Now it’s up to the young player to make his way up a depth chart that’s been restocked, finding a way into the mix with assumed starters Drue Tranquill and Max Redfield.

 

JALEN ELLIOTT
6′, 190 lbs.
Freshman, Safety

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A consensus 3-star prospect with offers from Auburn, Georgia, Miami, North Carolina, Virginia and Virginia Tech. Two-time captain and state champion. Two-way starter as quarterback, cornerback and safety.

A 2015 first-team All-State 5A player. On the 2015 Richmond Times-Dispatch All-Region first team, MVP of 2015 Virginia High School All-Star game.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Kelly may have tipped his hand when he glowed about Elliott in his Signing Day comments.

“Jalen Elliott competed like no player that I have seen since I’ve been coaching in a camp setting, and that’s over 25 years. His competitive spirit was unmatched,” Kelly said. “It was unparalleled in terms of I can’t remember a guy — maybe there was one guy that competed on the offensive line for me at Cincinnati in a camp that was similar, but this kid competed at every position at such a level that he was a can’t-miss guy for us in the recruiting process.”

There could be concerns about Elliott’s size—he doesn’t have prototype strong safety size or heft. But great safeties come in all shapes and sizes (Eric Weddle certainly doesn’t look like an All-Pro). That’s not to say that Elliott will have an All-American college career like Weddle did at Utah, but if he’s able to match his intellect with his competitive spirit, he’s playing the right position for a guy to make an immediate impact in South Bend.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I’m buying the hype on Elliott. I think he’s my leading snap-earner on the defensive side of the ball for the freshman class, out-pacing position-mate Devin Studstill, who had spring practice to work his way into first-team reps with Max Redfield.

Versatility is a big reason I’m so high on Elliott. He’s a guy who can stay at safety if the Irish need to move Tranquill around—a preference of Brian VanGorder’s. He’s a potential nickel or dime entry if the Irish want to put more defensive backs on the field. He’s also good enough to get a look as a cornerback. And he’ll certainly be someone who can be counted on as a special teamer.

Opportunity is the other obvious reason to target Elliott as true freshman contributor. Notre Dame’s safety play needs improvement, and new blood might be the best option.

I’m hesitant to match stats with snaps, especially knowing that sometimes productive safety play means you failed in the front seven. But I’ve got no hesitation grabbing the reins and kick-starting the Elliott bandwagon.

Giddy up.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg

 

Irish A-to-Z: Micah Dew-Treadway

M Dew Treadway 247
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When Micah Dew-Treadway arrived at Notre Dame, it was unclear what position he’d play on the defensive line. A redshirt fall and spring season under his belt, where Dew-Treadway will end up is still cloudy, but it does appear that he’s a contender to make an impact.

On a defensive line without Sheldon Day and Romeo Okwara—and a line a year away from losing Jarron Jones and Isaac Rochell—opportunity awaits. And as Keith Gilmore still sorts through his options at defensive end and tries his best to find his best four defensive linemen, Dew-Treadway’s sophomore season should be spent trying to make a pitch for some playing time in a rotation that’ll have to be deeper than last year’s.

An early-entry into college certainly helped Dew-Treadway. But with an eligibility clock that begins ticking come the fall, there’ll be an urgency to get on the field that maybe wasn’t felt before now for the Chicagoland prospect.

 

MICAH DEW-TREADWAY
6’4″, 300 lbs.
Sophomore, No. 97, DL

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A Semper-Fi All-American, Dew-Treadway picked Notre Dame the summer before his senior season. He was a three-star prospect, with eight sacks and 12 TFLs as a senior, earning All-State first-team by the Champaign News-Gazette and All-Area by the Chicago Sun Times.

Had offers from Mississippi State, Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, Wisconsin and others.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2015): Did not see action, preserving a year of eligibility.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

Sometimes getting the obvious ones right is a good thing.

Barring a nightmare scenario, I don’t see Dew-Treadway on the field this season. And that’s not a bad thing. Watching highlights from his senior season of high school, you saw Dew-Treadway do some very good things, displaying the type of player who could very easily turn into a Jarron Jones type performer. But there are also the habits of a high schooler on display, things that will need to be drilled out of him.

Fifteen practices this spring won’t necessarily do that. Nor will a fall playing behind veterans Sheldon Day and Jones. But as the Irish rollover their interior depth, newcomers will need to step to the forefront. So throw Dew-Treadway into a promising group that’ll include Jay Hayes and Jon Bonner, developmental players who could be key to providing the next level of reinforcements.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

It’s still hard to figure out what Dew-Treadway’s ceiling could be. He projected as a developmental prospect as a recruit and did nothing to change that during his redshirt season. We saw glimpses of athleticism and potential productivity during spring drills, though that’s hardly a data point worth chasing.

With good size and ability, Dew-Treadway could be an effective player in the trenches, showcasing the type of athleticism Kelly talked about on Signing Day. Until then, we’ll have to see how the 2016 season plays out—and if Keith Gilmore trusts him to be more than just a guy behind a guy.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

Brian Kelly’s mid-June comments about Jarron Jones might actually help Dew-Treadway see the field. Because if the optimum amount of snaps for Jones is 35, that means there’s about 20 more for some lineman not named Daniel Cage or Jerry Tillery, and it’s anybody’s guess who will fill those snaps.

I tend to think those snaps could go to Jon Bonner first. But I wouldn’t be surprised if Dew-Treadway finds his way into those second-team developmental snaps this year, moving ahead of a veteran like Peter Mokwuah or converted offensive lineman John Montelus, with athleticism a key factor in all of this.

 

*First 5-yard penalty for falling out of order. 

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg

Irish A-to-Z: Liam Eichenberg

Liam Eichenberg 247
Irish 247 / Tom Loy
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In freshman tackle Liam Eichenberg, Notre Dame has what looks like a future cornerstone on the offensive line. Now he’ll need to develop into the front-line player many hope he’ll become.

The good news? Harry Hiestand is on the case. Few offensive line coaches in college football do a better job of sculpting linemen, and in Eichenberg, the veteran Irish assistant has quite a piece of clay.

With Mike McGlinchey and Alex Bars slotted into the starting lineup heading into camp, Eichenberg will likely spend 2016 watching, learning, eating and lifting weights. But with the NFL beckoning for McGlinchey and the depth chart at tackle thin, there’s not much time to waste.

 

LIAM EICHENBERG
6’6″, 285 lbs.
Freshman, OL

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

Four-star, Top 100 recruit. Under Armour All-American. Max Preps first-team All-American. All-State Ohio first-team.

Eichenberg was one of the most sought after offensive tackle prospects in the country and he chose Notre Dame over Ohio State, Michigan, Florida State, Miami and a few dozen others.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

While Tommy Kraemer might be a better near-term prospect, there’s a “sky-is-the-limit” feel to Eichenberg after talking to people around the program. So while it’ll likely be Kraemer earning training camp praise from Kelly as the battle at right guard adds a new contender, giving Eichenberg the year to develop behind Mike McGlinchey and Alex Bars will be ideal.

That being said, there should be some urgency to this season for Eichenberg. Because it’ll take minutes for the college football world to notice how good of an NFL prospect McGlinchey is and a fifth-year might not be necessary for the Philadelphia native. And with little depth on the outside, an injury could change Eichenberg’s playing trajectory before a spring practice where he could be in the middle of a battle for playing time.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

A redshirt for Eichenberg.

Then a spring where he could be in a battle to replace Notre Dame’s next first-round left tackle. (It’s too early to predict if McGlinchey is heading to the NFL, but he certainly will have all eyes on him.)

Regardless, it’s a critically important season for Eichenberg on the practice field and in the weight room. Because there’s every reason to believe that the Irish will be reloading on the offensive line this recruiting cycle, and there’s be competition in the ranks from the moment he steps on campus.

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly

Texas CB Paulson Adebo commits to Notre Dame

Paulson Adebo Rivals
Rivals / Yahoo Sports
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Notre Dame’s recruiting momentum continued through the weekend, with cornerback Paulson Adebo committing to Notre Dame. The Texas speedster, a 6-foot-1, 175-pound cornerback, made the decision official via social media on Monday afternoon.

Adebo had offers from Texas, USC, Oklahoma, Baylor, Oregon, Georgia and many others.

Winning another recruiting battle in the state of Texas is key, with Adebo getting onto campus in May for a Junior Day. That the Irish also landed a commitment from Adebo with an offer from Oklahoma also out there should help calm worries that the Lone Star State would be off limits without Kerry Cooks on staff, who was likely involved in Adebo’s recruitment for the Sooners. That’s two Texas prospects in this recruiting cycle, with quarterback Avery Davis very excited about the news of Adebo’s commitment.

Some schools see Adebo as a wide receiver, though Notre Dame has him penciled as an outside cornerback. His length and speed (Adebo has run the 200m in 21.4, according to a report from IrishSportsDaily) make him perfect for Brian VanGorder’s aggressive cover scheme.

Adebo makes 13 commitments in the 2017 cycle after a weekend flurry added pass rusher Jonathon MacCollister and receiver Jordan Pouncey. (Underclassman Markese Stepp also committed.) The run of four commitments in four days nearly matches the five recruits the Irish added in March, when David Adams, Avery Davis, Kurt Hinish, Drew White and Pete Werner all joined the 2017 class.

Adebo caught 41 passes for 730 yards and 11 touchdowns on offense while intercepting five passes during his junior season. Per MaxPreps, Mansfield went 12-3 in 2015, including a 6-0 record in Texas’s 6A level.

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