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The futility of Heisman watches

Sep 30, 2009, 7:30 AM EDT

I’ll admit it, I’m a sucker for the Heisman Trophy ceremony. Everything about it I enjoy, right down to the made for TV cheesiness that ESPN has mastered, with Chris Fowler doing his best Jim Nance at Augusta impression, and the little interview stations in different corners of the Downtown Athletic Club (or wherever the award ceremony has been moved to). If there’s a trophy that’s a better individual prize in all of sports, I’m game for a debate.

That said, there’s nothing I dislike more than the run-up to the actual award. I’ve got no problem with people like the Heisman Pundit, who does his best Politico impression to predict the award’s outcome, but when power brokers like ESPN and Sports Illustrated dedicate weekly power polls to predict the winner, it starts to feel like the tail is wagging the dog.

For much of the preseason, it’s been preordained that the award was a three-man race between Colt McCoy, last year’s winner Sam Bradford, and previous winner Tim Tebow. With Bradford down with a shoulder injury, Tebow being somewhat mortal and now recently concussed, and McCoy already having thrown five picks in four games, the season-long scripted kudos-fest seems to have unraveled a bit.

But don’t tell that to ESPN.

Tebow still sits high above his Heisman throne, even after playing good-to-pretty good football. Yet to see how ESPN’s Tim Griffin (whose Big 12 blog I enjoy and read daily) puts it, they’re already polishing up a second little stiff-armer for Tebow. Ranked #1 in ESPN’s “Heisman Watch, presented by Nissan,” here’s what Griffin had to say about Tebow’s performance Saturday:

1. Tim Tebow, Florida: He still has had the most inspirational season of any leader, and if he
rebounds from the concussion he suffered against Kentucky in time for
the LSU game in two weeks, it will only add to his mystique. His
statistics vs. Kentucky were pedestrian by his high standards before
his injury — 123 yards rushing, two TDs, 103 passing yards, one TD –
but he will be primed for a big comeback when he returns to the lineup.

Meanwhile, down at #5, he has this to say about Jimmy Clausen’s game at Purdue:

5. Jimmy Clausen, Notre Dame: Back-to-back fourth-quarter comebacks on an injured foot has a certain
sense of drama, particularly when it’s being directed by a Notre Dame
quarterback. Clausen’s 2-yard, fourth-down TD pass to Kyle Rudolph with 25 seconds left showed his moxie in the victory over Purdue. His
statistics were mediocre (171 passing yards, one TD pass, minus-13
yards rushing) but his comeback late in the game on one healthy foot
was supreme.

I’m already on the record as saying this watch list is silly, but if you’re going to do it, at least do it right. There are plenty of superlatives that Tim Tebow already deserves, but let’s dial back the “inspirational season rhetoric.” Was he inspirational in his two performances against cupcakes Charleston Southern and Troy? Was he inspirational still playing with the game well in hand when he was drilled by a defensive end coming around the corner? I’m a Tebow fan, but we’ve yet to see a truly Heisman-esque performance this year.

Likewise, it feels like Griffin is trying to support an argument instead of fill out a ballot when he places Clausen at fifth. Back-to-back fourth quarter comebacks have a sense of drama regardless of where the football is played, not just for Notre Dame. And Clausen’s “mediocre stats” were more a product of him sitting out almost half the football game, not because of anything he did. Even mentioning Clausen’s minus 13 rushing yards is confusing, since when did getting sacked on a bum wheel turn into a negative for a dropback passer like Clausen?

The point of this isn’t to rail on Griffin, a very good journalist most likely assigned to a water-cooler topic as part of a synergistic plan to take advantage of ESPN’s broadcast rights to the Heisman telecast. (Editors Note: Be sure to check out the on-air plugs for the Inside the Irish live blog during the NBC broadcast of Notre Dame games!) The point is that too often we go into the season trying to support a thesis, not trying to decide who the best player in the country is.

There are plenty of “intricacies” to Heisman balloting that already influence voters minds. The last thing we need is season long politicking by the network that broadcasts the ceremony, even if it is just for the sake of additional content.

UPDATE:

In the spirit of full disclosure, it seems like ESPN isn’t the only one that does something like this…  

  1. TLNDMA - Sep 30, 2009 at 9:20 AM

    These things seem to straighten themselves out as the seasons go along. If Clausen,”Jimmy Football”, is still in the Heisman talk come November, it can only be good news for the whole ND team. Keith those numbers for Tebow look pretty impressive to me. Though I do get a kick out of the “inspirational leader” stuff. What quarterback of a national championship team was not a leader? And he (Tebow) was only the starter for one championship, something I’d like to say about Clausen someday. Secondly Tebow’s famous quote “no team will play harder”, actually came 4hrs too late that day, after a loss to Ol’Miss. at home. Oh well, all this stuff is good theatre on tv I guess.

  2. Fischer - Oct 1, 2009 at 11:34 AM

    Man, NBC! Why is there only one non-quarterback?! What about the other 21 players on the field!
    How about some love for guys like AJ Green, Eric Berry, or Eric Decker.
    The lack of non-Quarterbacks in this discussion is pathetic, especially when guys like Jarcoy Harris, Jevan Snead, and Darrel Clark are still in the discussion.

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