Five things we learned: Notre Dame vs. Washington

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It’s bordering on ridiculous and closing quickly on beyond description.

The Irish once again pull out a miracle football game and win one for the ages. Maybe it’s not for the ages, but merely for the season,  as the Irish are making a case for reserving their own ESPN Classic channel. As Jake Locker’s fourth down heave to the middle of the field rattled out of the hands of D’Andre Goodwin (thanks to a fierce sandwich hit by safeties Kyle McCarthy and Harrison Smith), Notre Dame again escaped improbably, walking away with a 37-30 overtime victory.

During a game where driving rain fell sideways and a sloppy track befuddled Irish defenders and quarterback Jimmy Clausen, the Irish may not have played perfectly, but they certainly had a flair for the dramatic. The Irish defense, battered by the arm of Locker and the running of Chris Polk, stood strong when the going got toughest, pulling out two goal-line stands, the final one a tour-de-force performance that included 8 plays that started after the Huskies got to the Irish one-yard-line, and a mulligan for the Huskies after a bizarre roughing the snapper penalty was called. The Irish forced Steve Sarkisian to attempt a second field goal after running over nine-minutes off the 4th quarter clock, and gave the Irish its chance to win the ballgame by keeping the contest a one-possession game.

It wasn’t perfect, it wasn’t pretty, but it was certainly gutty. The Irish stand 4-1 with a bye week before the Trojans of Southern Cal come to town. Here’s what we learned today:

1) Golden Tate has answered the bell.

Tate’s herculean numbers explode from the stat sheet: 9 catches for 244 yards (27.1 per catch), 1 carry for 31 yards, and a TD. With the absence of Michael Floyd, Tate has stepped up his game, getting the ball in every way possible and wreaking havoc on defenses that struggle to contain him. While the Irish offense is certainly a different beast with Floyd out, Tate has done everything he could to put the Irish passing game on his back and create plays.

2) Jimmy Clausen is ready for his closeup.

In a monsoon, Jimmy Clausen completed 74% of his passes for 422 yards. An incredible feat that’s almost becoming a regular occurrence by the junior quarterback. 31 times Clausen dropped back to pass, and 23 times Irish players came down with the ball. Of his 8 misses, off the top of my head, I can think of two throwaways, two drops (one a TD by Robby Parris, the other an INT through Armando Allen’s hands), and only one truly bad decision — a backwards pass that didn’t technically count against Clausen’s passing numbers. The only thing that stopped Clausen today were his suspect feet, already battered before they had to deal with the sloppy sod of Notre Dame Stadium. We’re running out of things to say about Clausen, who was once again cool under pressure in his final two possessions. With 2:52 remaining in regulation, Clausen marched the Irish offense down the field with remarkable efficiency, 5 plays for 63 yards, in only 104 seconds. Most people wait at stoplights longer. With a bye week, expect Clausen to have his foot on ice for the next 9 days, resting for the biggest challenge of his career.

3) The Irish defense continues to pick itself back up.

Let’s start with the bad: 457 total yards — 176 on the ground, 281 in the air — and countless missed tackles. The Irish looked like a powder puff team trying to tackle 200-pound running back Chris Polk, who carried defenders countless times for 136 tough yards, many after first contact. But the defense stood tall when it mattered the most. Bend but don’t break would be an insult to this unit — the Irish defense looked like Rocky Balboa pulling itself off of the mat and miraculously stopping the Huskies when things were at their bleakest. With the Huskies up 24-19 and time running out in the 3rd quarter, the Irish stuffed Locker three times from inside the three-yard-line, getting a turnover on downs at the one-foot line. Then, in a goal-line stand that has to match up with the greatest in school history, the Irish survived 8 plays of do-or-die football, and forced a field goal by Sarkisian’s Huskies when a touchdown would’ve put the game out of reach. The Irish gave up two field goals in the two-minute drill, but when backed up against it all, somehow came out alive.

4) The red zone offense without Michael Floyd is a question mark.

Five field goals. Five. For those who don’t have Nick Tausch in their college football fantasy league, this is a nightmare. The Irish only punted the ball twice today, but when they drove the ball inside the Husky 20, the offense that was running in overdrive seemed to stall out. It’s clear that Notre Dame missing their jump ball threat in Floyd is forcing the Irish to find different ways to score, and today the Irish couldn’t figure a way into the end zone. The running game got stuffed several times today, and while Tausch’s accuracy today was exemplary, Notre Dame needs to get 6 instead of settling for 3, especially in games like this.

5) There’s a magic in the sound of their name…

Say what you will, but there is something going on here. Another miracle finish and another celebration for the Irish and their fans. The goal line stands, the late game heroics, the two-point conversion, it’s as if Notre Dame actually believes that these games should go this way. Even with Locker and the Huskies miraculously marching 70 yards on 9 plays in the final 1:20, the Irish offense calmly went down the field in overtime and scored in two plays. Two minutes earlier, with a one-point lead and two points needed to make it a field goal game, Notre Dame’s trick shotgun draw was snuffed out, but Robert Hughes and a squadron of offensive lineman willed their way into the end zone. That’s the kind of play that becomes a signature moment. That’s the kind of play that wakes up the echoes.

The Irish once again played a dangerous game with fate, but walked away victorious. After years of feeling like nothing can go right, the Irish have reversed course over the last three games and walk into their bye week knowing that the luck of the Irish may have been restored. 

Sheldon Day drafted in 4th round by Jaguars

North Carolina v Notre Dame
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Former Notre Dame captain Sheldon Day didn’t have to wait long on Saturday to hear his name called. The Indianapolis native, All-American, and the Irish’s two-time defensive lineman of the year was pick number 103, the fourth pick of the fourth round on Saturday afternoon.

Day was the seventh Irish player drafted, following first rounders Ronnie Stanley and Will Fuller, second round selections Jaylon Smith and Nick Martin, and third rounders KeiVarae Russell and C.J. Prosise.

Day has a chance to contribute as he joins the 24th-ranked defense in the league. Joining a draft class heavy on defensive players—Jalen Ramsey, Myles Jack and Yannick Ngakoue already picked ahead of him—the front seven will also include last year’s No. 3 overall pick Dante Fowler, who missed the entire season with a knee injury.

Scouted by the Jaguars at the Senior Bowl, Day doesn’t necessarily have the size to be a traditional defensive tackle. But under Gus Bradley’s attacking system (Bradley coordinated the Seahawks defense for four seasons), Day will find a niche and a role in a young defense that’s seen a heavy investment the past two years.

Smith, Martin, Russell and Prosise all drafted Friday night

INDIANAPOLIS, IN - SEPTEMBER 13: William Fuller #7 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish and Nick Martin #72 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish celebrate a touchdown during the game against the Purdue Boilermakers at Lucas Oil Stadium on September 13, 2014 in Indianapolis, Indiana.  (Photo by Michael Hickey/Getty Images)
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Jaylon Smith, Nick Martin, KeiVarae Russell and C.J. Prosise were all selected on Friday, with four Irish teammates taken on the second night of the NFL Draft. As mentioned, Smith came off the board at pick 34, with the Cowboys gambling on the injured knee of the Butkus Award winner. Nick Martin was selected at pick 50, joining former teammate Will Fuller in Houston.

The third round saw Russell and Prosise come off the board, with Kansas City jumping on the confident cornerback and the Seahawks taking Notre Dame’s breakout running back. It capped off a huge night for the Irish with Sheldon Day, one of the more productive football players in college football, still on the board for teams to pick.

Here’s a smattering of instant reactions from the immediate aftermath.

 

 

Jaylon Smith goes to Dallas with 34th pick

PITTSBURGH, PA - NOVEMBER 07:  Jaylon Smith #9 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish celebrates by wearing the hat of team mascot, Lucky The Leprechaun, following their 42-30 win against the Pittsburgh Panthers at Heinz Field on November 7, 2015 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)
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Jaylon Smith’s nightmare is over.

After watching his football life thrown into chaos with a career-altering knee injury, Smith came off the board after just two picks in the second round, selected by the Dallas Cowboys with the 34th pick. His selection ended the most challenging months of Smith’s young life, and come after cashing in a significant tax-free, loss-of-value insurance policy that’ll end up being just shy of a million dollars.

No, it’s not top-five money like Smith could’ve expected if he didn’t get hurt. But Smith isn’t expected to play in 2016.

And while there was a pre-draft fascination that focused on the doom and gloom more than the time-consuming recovery, it’s worth pointing out that Dallas’ medical evaluation comes from the source—literally. After all, it was the Cowboys team doctor, Dr. Dan Cooper, who performed the surgery to repair Smith’s knee.

Smith joins Ezekiel Elliott with the Cowboys, arguably the two best position players in the draft. While he might not be available in 2016, Smith will be under the supervision of the Cowboys’ medical staff, paid a seven-figure salary to get healthy with the hopes that he’ll be back to his All-American self sooner than later, especially as the nerve in his knee returns to full functionality.

Will Fuller brings his game-changing skills to the Texans offense

PITTSBURGH, PA - NOVEMBER 07: Will Fuller #7 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish catches a pass before running into the endzone for a touchdown in the second quarter in front of Avonte Maddox #14 of the Pittsburgh Panthers during the game at Heinz Field on November 7, 2015 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)
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In all the weeks and months leading up to the NFL Draft, one key tidbit linking Will Fuller to the Houston Texans never seemed to come up. The relationship between Brian Kelly and Bill O’Brien.

The two coaches share a high school alma mater, a friendship that made the due diligence on Notre Dame’s prolific playmaker easy. And it was clear that after all their research, Houston was aggressive in their pursuit of Fuller, trading up to make Notre Dame’s All-American the second receiver off the board, triggered a run at the position.

“He was a guy that we felt strongly about,” Texans general manager Rick Smith told the team’s official website. “We didn’t want to take a chance on not getting him. We were aggressive. We went and made the move.”

That move made Fuller’s decision to leave Notre Dame after three seasons a good one. While it’ll require the Irish to rebuild at a position where Fuller served as one of college football’s best home run hitters, it gives Houston a vertical threat that can extend the top of a defense for a Texans offense that was serious about finding some solutions for a team already in the playoff mix.

Yes, Fuller has work to do. Completing the easy catch is one big area. But for all the pre-draft talk about his limitations, Brian Kelly took on some of the criticism head-on when talking with the Texans’ media reporter.

“Some people have compared him to Teddy Ginn, that’s not fair. He can catch the ball vertically like nobody I’ve coached in 25 years,” Kelly said (a sentiment some hack also laid out). Teddy Ginn is a very good player, but this is a different kind of player. If you throw the ball deep, he’s going to catch the football.”

Fuller is never going to be the biggest receiver on the field. But while most of the banter on his game focused on the negative or his deep ball skills, expect Fuller to find a role not just running deep but unleashed in the screen game as well. After the Texans spent huge on quarterback Brock Osweiler and have invested in fellow Philadelphia native and 2015 third-round pick Jaelen Strong, Fuller wasn’t selected for the future but rather expected to be a day-one piece of the puzzle.

“This will change the speed on offense immediately,” Kelly said. “It was not ‘Hey, let’s wait a couple of years’. It was ‘Let’s go get this right now’ and I think Will will do that for them.”