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Catching up with… Mike Anello

Apr 13, 2010, 1:00 PM EDT

It isn’t hard to remember why Mike Anello was a fan favorite. Standing a shade under 5-foot-9, and weighing 175-pounds soaking wet, you’d probably struggle to pick him out of a lineup of his fellow dorm mates.

Yet to classify Anello as just another Notre Dame student, or to even make the dreaded Rudy comparison would be a disservice to the Chicago product’s athletic ability.
Mike Anello is very much an elite college athlete. With speed and quickness to rival anybody’s on the Notre Dame roster, Anello made his mark as a pure menace on special teams, who was such a difference maker in that segment of the game that he had hopes – rightful hopes – of  an NFL training camp invitation after his collegiate career was finished.

A broken leg suffered during the final game of his junior year against USC plagued Anello through most of his senior season, and robbed him of a chance to climb the depth chart in the defensive backfield. The injury was so severe that Anello had the rod that was inserted after the injury removed on February 10th, effectively ending his football career and moving him onto his finance career at a venture capital firm in Boston. 

But Anello hasn’t stopped helping the Irish. He’s joined the blogger regime, and started MikeAnello.com to help raise money for St. Baldrick’s Foundation, an organization that supports children’s cancer research. In the short time, since he started the website, it’s garnered over 6,200 hits, leaving one Irish blogger looking over his shoulder at some stiff competition.

I caught up with Anello over email and a nice phone conversation. Here’s what he said.

On what made him such a great special teams player:

“Most of it was film work, studying techniques, and noticing the week to week changes,” Anello told me. When I pressed him what made him such a great gunner, he stressed that it was “technique, especially on kickoffs,” but he eventually admitted he had the right mindset. “There was no way that anyone should be able to block me,” Anello said modestly, but also explaining what made him such a great player.

On his sneaky good athleticism and his surprising speed:

“I was only timed once in the forty, but I ran it in 4.45,” Anello told him, something that shouldn’t be a surprise for those that watched him the past two seasons. “We hadn’t trained at all on speed techniques and I was hoping to trim some time in the first ten yards for the Pro Day. The surgery was disappointing, because we were all wondering how fast I’d run it. I was hoping to get into the 4.3s.” 

There weren’t many guys on the roster that beat him on foot, though Anello admitted that his “top end speed was a little less than some guys.” But after a long offseason of rehabbing the broken leg he suffered at the end of his junior year, he was still extremely limited physically. “My leg hurt the most when I jogged,” he admitted, and the injury limited him throughout the week and forced him to concentrate solely on special teams work, instead of working his way up at nickel back.

On Charlie Weis:

“A lot of people never really gave him a chance. Everyone has this image of him and it couldn’t be further from the truth,” Anello said. Even though he’s out at Notre Dame, Weis has even gone to the next level trying to help him get into a NFL training camp. “He’s said and done some of the most amazing things I’ve ever heard. He was going to make sure I got into a camp. He made sure that teams were willing to take a player that was strictly a special teams guy,” Anello said, relaying that the former coach was talking to colleagues in both Kansas City as well as down at the Senior Bowl.

(All this after Weis helped Anello secure a prestigious summer internship after his sophomore year at Notre Dame.)

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I’d invite all of you to head over to Mike’s blog and watch some of the video interviews he’s done, walking us through his decision to attend Notre Dame, his goal of walking onto the football team, and what it was like to finally hit the field and earn a scholarship.

He’s got a goal of raising $1,000 for St. Baldrick’s Foundation and the Notre Dame team, “The Bald & The Beautiful” is hoping to raise $50,000, up from $26,000 last year. The head shaving will commence on April 21st in LaFortune Student Center.