Friday notes: Plenty to talk about


The 2010 Notre Dame Fantasy Football Camp has concluded, and even though United Airlines, Chicago traffic, the O’Hare Airport Hilton and a slow-moving taxi driver conspired against me, I’m back home a mere ten hours late and finally back on my usual schedule.

The camp was an amazing experience and something I’ll never forget, but man — could I have picked a worse week to unplug?

Here are a few notes that I’ve been meaning to touch on, as this was quite a week.


News broke today that the Associated Press will not strip USC of their national title, but if there’s any one story that encapsulates my feelings on the NCAA verdict rendered against the Trojans’, it’s Bill Plaschke’s column from today’s Los Angeles Times, which cites the extreme arrogance that permeates from the Trojan athletic department.

As suspected, the only thing that could truly stop Los Angeles’ most
powerful football program was its own heady belief in that power. It was
no surprise, then, that the USC football dynasty has been whittled to
dust by the only opponent equally big and just as bold.

They were whacked by their ego. They were steamrolled by their
self-importance. They were sanctioned by themselves.

The NCAA didn’t barge through the Heritage Hall doors Thursday, it was
invited inside by a Trojans football program that cultivated a daringly
headstrong culture permeating everything from the Coliseum field to the
coaches’ offices.

The two-year bowl suspension, the 30 lost scholarships, the 14 vacated
wins, the possibly forfeited national championship and Heisman Trophy,
this giant of defeats was created by the same Trojans attitude that once
caused them to lose in little places like Corvallis and Eugene.

There’s no better word to describe the Trojans’ reign over college football than arrogance. Like Plaschke said, it was arrogance that allowed the Trojans to steam-roll national opponents like Penn State, Oklahoma, (and Notre Dame) but it was that same arrogance that led to their losses against teams like Oregon State and and Stanford when they were six touchdown favorites.

Southern Cal’s vehement denial of serious wrongdoing and their steadfast belief that they had no control over the situation encapsulates the institutional arrogance that allowed them to get into this mess to begin with. How else to you explain a program that complaints about how difficult it is to keep agents and managers away from their players, while allowing them to wander the sidelines unmonitored during daily practices? From top to bottom, everybody at the university had a role in the lack of institutional control, but the bulls-eye should be on athletic director Mike Garrett.  


Notre Dame released jersey numbers for the upcoming season, and there were a few interesting tidbits to come out of it. First, here are the freshman numbers:

     Austin Collinsworth  28
     Bruce Heggie  93
     Andrew Hendrix  12
     Bennett Jackson  86
     Christian Lombard  74
     Luke Massa  14
     Kendall Moore  8
     Tate Nichols  64
     Louis Nix  67
     Derek Roback  49
     Cameron Roberson  31
     Kona Schwenke  96
     Prince Shembo  34
     Daniel Smith  87
     Danny Spond  13
     Justin Utupo  53
     Alex Welch  82

Austin Collinsworth inheriting safety Kyle McCarthy’s jersey number might also mean Collinsworth will inherit his position, as the depth chart at safety is much thinner than that at wide receiver, and Collinsworth might have the skills to make it as a free safety quickly. The trio of Andrew Hendrix, Danny Spond, and Luke Massa at 12, 13, and 14 respectively makes you wonder if Spond will get a shot at quarterback, but it’s highly unlikely that the Irish will roll with five true quarterbacks, with Tommy Rees already enrolled.

Here are the jersey changes for returning players:

     Alex Bullard  68 to 72
     Bobby Burger  86 to 41
     Lane Clelland  96 to 73
     Theo Riddick  32 to 84
     Brandon Walker  14 to 96

Riddick leaving the 30s for the 80s means the change to wide receiver is far from temporary and Walker giving his 14 to Luke Massa means the senior scholarship kicker should be happy that Notre Dame is still paying him to get his degree. Lane Clelland’s switch back to offense, where he could see time at guard or tackle means he’s back in his #73 jersey. Burger’s jersey switch to 41 means he’ll likely see more time in the backfield or detached from the line of scrimmage, a better fit at 6-foot-2, 245 pounds.


I’ll get into it more later, but I’d be absolutely shocked if the Irish joined the Big Ten now, as it’s becoming more and more clear that the Big East will survive, the Big Ten will cap expansion at one team for now, and the Big 12 is the only conference that could see itself in big trouble.
After spending the weekend in South Bend with coaches, administrators and support staff, it’s clear they’re just as curious about what might happen as those of us who write about this stuff. What’ll be interesting for the Pac-10 is what happens if they do add Texas, Texas A&M, Texas Tech, Oklahoma, and Oklahoma State to the conference. Could you imagine how much travel costs will go up for sports like baseball and women’s basketball?

Kirk Bohls of the Austin American-Statesman reports that all the Big 12 teams are in, but the Aggies are “sitting on the fence.” (Does Texas A&M really think it has the sway to join anyone else?) Either way, let’s just assume they’re all coming. If the league does add six schools, I expect the conference to split into two, eight-team divisions, with the California schools joining Oregon, Oregon State, Washington and Washington State as the Coastal Division and Arizona and Arizona State joining the Big 12 teams to form the Arid Division. (Couldn’t think of anything better, desert sounded too harsh.) That’s got to be the only way for non-revenue generating sports and basketball to logistically handle the rigors of midweek travel, because while people may have forgotten the last few weeks, these are students playing the games.


One final thought: Had the pleasure to throw around both the old Notre Dame game balls, the Wilson 1001, and the new ball, the Wilson GST 1003. I thought the 1003 was a much better feeling ball and you could immediately tell the difference in the leather and the tackiness of the grip. It’s a little bit lighter colored leather, has seams that are black instead of white, so it might not be as aesthetically traditional, but I think wide outs, quarterbacks and running backs will all like the change.  

Swarbrick: Kelly will be back in 2017

SOUTH BEND, IN - AUGUST 30:  Head coach Brian Kelly of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish watches as his team takes on the Rice Owls at Notre Dame Stadium on August 30, 2014 in South Bend, Indiana.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

Brian Kelly will be coaching Notre Dame in 2017. That’s according to his boss, athletic director Jack Swarbrick.

So even with a 2-5 record and a difficult slate still to come, there will be no change atop the Irish football program.

“Brian will lead this team out of the tunnel opening day next year,” Swarbrick told

Swarbrick’s vote of confidence is nothing new—he’s taken a similar stance in his weekly appearances the past few weeks. But it likely became necessary as the season continues to frustrate, and Notre Dame’s head coaching position becomes part of the hot seat discussion.

But even with plenty to accomplish during this week off, both on the field and in the classroom, Kelly was out front and on the ESPN airwaves, openly shouldering the blame of this season’s failures, while also mentioning this is the youngest team at Notre Dame since 1972.

See the entire segment here:


Bye Week Mailbag: Now Open

SOUTH BEND, IN - OCTOBER 15: DeShone Kizer #14 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish runs the ball during the game against the Stanford Cardinal at Notre Dame Stadium on October 15, 2016 in South Bend, Indiana. Stanford defeated Notre Dame 17-10. (Photo by Michael Hickey/Getty Images)

It’s been too long. Or maybe it hasn’t.

Against my better judgment, I’m opening up the mailbag. Drop your questions below or at Twitter @KeithArnold.

How we got here: The Defense

05 September 2015:  Notre Dame Fighting Irish defensive coordinator Brian VanGorder stands with his players in action during a game between the Notre Dame Fighting Irish and the Texas Longhorns at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, IN. (Icon Sportswire via AP Images)

The first of a multi-part series as we look at the 2-5 Irish at the bye week. 


Notre Dame’s season was sunk by Brian VanGorder’s defense. That sentence is much easier to write after seeing the unit without its former coordinator. But it was just as clear after watching the Irish play their first four games of 2016 that Brian Kelly needed to make a change. The Irish gave up a combined 124 points in their three September defeats, a season-high for either yards or points (against FBS competition) for Texas, Michigan State and Duke.

For many VanGorder detractors, the move came four games too late. The Irish were plagued by big plays and schematic breakdowns throughout 2015 (and before), a fatal flaw of a defense filled with talented personnel that too often underperformed.

How did the Irish get here? Any why did Kelly make the decision to hire VanGorder—a decision that has already impacted his legacy in South Bend?

Let’s look back.



When Brian Kelly tapped VanGorder to replace Bob Diaco, he was hiring a coach who seemed like an evolutionary next step. While Diaco’s 3-4 base and point prevention philosophies were the perfect tonic for improving a team that was wrecked by the Tenuta era, Alabama undressed the Irish at the end of the 2012 season, a simplicity in Notre Dame’s scheme that received a few comments from Alabama players in the postgame glow that likely had Kelly wondering if they’d hit their ceiling.

That’s an important factor to remember when Kelly was hiring Diaco’s replacement. Because the foundation of the defense was well established. Kelly needed someone to build on top of it.

That likely made VanGorder’s pitch music to Kelly’s ears. Because while Diaco relied heavily on his base set, VanGorder’s DNA included sub-packages, complementary parts, Rex Ryan-inspired blitzes, and a philosophy that no throw would be conceded— underneath or otherwise.

Add to that Kelly’s personal relationship with VanGorder. Kelly had watched his former Grand Valley State colleague from the beginning of his career. He had seen him work with young players and believed in him as a teacher (something he referenced multiple times when he introduced VanGorder to the local media) before blazing his own trail, earning a head coaching opportunity at Wayne State, a high-profile coordinator position at Georgia and eventually making his way to the NFL—for a long time, farther up the food chain than Kelly.

Perhaps that was enough to dismiss his chaotic year at Auburn, when the Tigers season—and defense—went up in smoke as Gene Chizik was fired and VanGorder’s defense gave up 63 to No. 20 Texas A&M, 38 to No. 5 Georgia, and were blown out 49-0 to Alabama—after after mid-October.

But for a variety of reasons, likely his success turning to coaches with a personal connection, Kelly once again did so, hiring an NFL position coach who was a few years removed from being an elite-level coaching target for a vacancy that was a high-profile national opening.



The challenge with VanGorder’s struggles always seemed to be the caveats. Injuries decimated his first defense, a group that shutout Michigan and stymied Stanford, but crumbled by the end of the season, with USC naming a number and the Irish tumbling after giving up big, ugly scores to Arizona State, Northwestern, Louisville and USC.

The 2015 defense had strong moments—dominating Texas, holding Clemson to 24 points and nice wins over option opponents Georgia Tech and Navy—but obviously imploded late against Stanford and never stood a chance against Ohio State, with injuries once again leveling the depth chart.

But there were improvements. Between 2014 and 2015 VanGorder’s unit got a better handle on up-tempo attacks. An offseason committed to stopping the option saw those goals achieved with successful defensive performances against Georgia Tech and Navy. And even if VanGorder’s veteran-heavy 2015 unit was mostly moving on (the talent exodus is staggering now that you look at it), most had talked themselves into believing that Year Three would have better institutional knowledge for all, a depth chart ready to step in and perform.

[A necessary footnote: Luck certainly wasn’t on VanGorder’s side. Injuries, transfers and suspensions certainly didn’t do him any favors, either. Whether it was the disappearance of edge rushers—Kolin Hill, Jhonny Williams, Bo Wallace—or the loss of KeiVarae Russell and Max Redfield, injuries to Jarron Jones, Shaun Crawford, Nick Watkins and Drue Tranquill, there was always the defense VanGorder hoped to put on the field… and then the one that he actually did.]



Austin, Texas. Opening night, 2016.

The Irish defense was exposed against the Longhorns, shredded by both the power running attack and freshman Shane Buechele’s passing. It was an all-systems failure: Scheme, blown assignments, questionable personnel decisions—all pointing back to a game plan that required a bunch of assumptions (new offensive coordinator Sterlin Gilbert was difficult to scout), but nonetheless was a disastrous start.



Even if Kelly gave the staff’s performance a passing grade, by noon after the loss to Duke, the decision was made to relieve VanGorder of his duties.

“This is a difficult decision,” Kelly said in a statement. “I have the utmost respect for Brian as both a person and football coach, but our defense simply isn’t it where it should be and I believe this change is necessary for the best interest of our program and our student-athletes.”



While Kelly won’t likely go any deeper into the decision to make the change than he’s done in a few media sessions, it’s telling just how different the defense is organized with VanGorder out the door.

Full-unit meetings have been turned into position group teaching sessions. Depth chart’s have been reshuffled, resulting in major personnel changes. A base three-man front has taken over as the status quo. And the defense has stopped giving up points and big plays, especially after they found their footing against Syracuse.

Where Kelly goes from here is anyone’s guess—especially considering he’s still trying his best to get this season under control. But after tapping into his personal coaching network to fill a premium vacancy, don’t expect Kelly to settle on the familiar—or for Swarbrick to allow it—when his roster is loaded with young talent and in need of a fundamentally sound plan.

CB Elijah Hicks commits to Notre Dame

Irish 247

Just hours after one member of Notre Dame’s 2017 class stepped away, another took his place. Southern California defensive back Elijah Hicks committed to the Irish. The four-star prospect, an all-purpose defender who can play safety, cornerback and contribute in special teams, pulled the trigger just days after taking his official visit to South Bend.

He made the news official via Twitter and recorded a commitment video with Irish 247’s Tom Loy. And even as Notre Dame’s season continues in the wrong direction, Hicks bought in to the message being sold by the Irish coaching staff, picking Notre Dame over programs like UCLA, USC, Michigan and Washington.

A year after stocking up the secondary—Hicks gives the Irish a nice piece to pair with Paulson Adebo and all-purpose athlete Isaiah Robertson. And as we watch Troy Pride, Julian Love, Donte Vaughn and Devin Studstill might a quick impact on the back end, Hicks compares favorably to that quartet, another prospect with elite offers who will come into South Bend ready to fight for a spot in the two-deep.

Hicks told why he pulled the trigger now:

“I chose Notre Dame because on my official visit I felt comfortable and it felt like home,” said Hicks. “One of my favorite quotes about Notre Dame is, ‘Other teams play college football, Notre Dame is college football.’ Coach Lyght, I feel like he could give me the tools that’s necessary to make it to the NFL and have a long career. Also, they have a rich tradition and great academic support.”

Hicks plays for La Mirada High School, the same program that produced reserve Irish tight end Tyler Luatua. He returns Notre Dame’s 2017 class to 18, a Top 10 group by any evaluation.