Jack Swarbrick and the seismic shifts

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It might be hard for some Notre Dame fans to fathom, but athletic director Jack Swarbrick might be the knight in shining armor that saved college football.

That could be overstating things a bit, but for those who clung to the idea that the status quo in college football wasn’t all that bad, they should be praising Notre Dame’s AD, a man who worked quickly and quietly behind the scenes, forging alliances and staying ahead of the rising tide the entire time, even when media reports fueled anxiety of not just fans, but collegiate coaches, administrators and university presidents. Make no mistake, this was college football’s Cuban Missile Crisis, and Swarbrick just stared down the enemy and saved the college football world.

While Nebraska and Colorado fled the Big 12 for the Big Ten and Pac-10 respectively, the mass exodus of six teams to the Pac-10 never happened, largely because Texas and the Pac-10 couldn’t agree on the value of the Longhorns’ television rights. With Texas unwilling to relinquish their local television rights, it opened the door for ridiculed Big 12 commission Dan Beebe to salvage the conference as a 10 team league, with Texas, Texas Tech, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, and Texas A&M all staying put after it appeared they were all but gone.

It bears mentioned that Texas athletic director DeLoss Dodds and Jack Swarbrick spent a lot of time these past few weeks discussing realignment, and the two men might have come to some sort of agreement days before any news broke on Texas’ decision.

For Notre Dame, independence was the crucial element to all of this, and Swarbrick maintained that while also putting the Irish in the best place possible for future television negotiations. His willingness to back away from a 7-4-1 model that made scheduling impossible and embrace a 6-5-1 schedule will only benefit Notre Dame when it comes to finding attractive playing partners and networks willing to pay to broadcast those games. His ability to see through Big Ten commission Jim Delany’s smoke screen, which included a persuasive sales pitch based around a potential invitation to the prestigious AAU and fuzzy economic numbers for the Big Ten Network was something that the previous athletic administration might not have been able to withstand.

What will be the most interesting sidenote in all of the maneuvering this offseason will be the media’s role in all of this. For the first time in a few years, ESPN wasn’t out front powering this story, it was a select group of reporters with highly placed sources. Chip Brown at OrangeBloods.com, and an Austin-based radio personality, seemed to fuel most of the Big 12 based information, likely from a well placed source in the Texas administration. There’s no doubt in my mind that whoever at Texas was supplying Brown with his scoop was doing it to maximize the Longhorns’ financial grab, and from the sounds of the reports, they did so successfully.

From a Big Ten standpoint, Teddy Greenstein of the Chicago Tribune seemed to be the one waving Jim Delany’s flag. For the past few months, Greenstein was out in front of stories, writing about the virtues of the Big Ten Network as well as moving the story forward with insider information likely supplied from someone inside the league, which headquarters in Chicago. Even after it was fairly clear that the Big Ten Network was hardly the source of twenty-million dollar revenue shares, Greenstein continued to find reasons for Notre Dame to join the conference, writing this late last week:

If the Pac-10 does plump to 16 teams (by adding Texas, Texas A&M,
Texas Tech, Oklahoma and Oklahoma State), conference officials
reportedly will push for two automatic bids to Bowl Championship Series
games.

That threat might help push Notre Dame into accepting a Big Ten bid.
[Kirk] Herbstreit believes Notre Dame “has to” go the conference route because
of that BCS instability and the extra revenue derived from the Big Ten’s
lucrative combo TV deal (ESPN/ABC and the Big Ten Network).

“I’m not a Notre Dame hater,” Herbstreit said, “just a Notre Dame
realist. When you look across the landscape and where we are headed, it
becomes very important for them to align themselves with one of these
power conferences.”

Notre Dame also could face additional pressure from its TV partner, NBC,
which Comcast has acquired.

Industry analysts are certain the Notre Dame deal is a money loser for
NBC. In 2008, the network agreed to an extension that pays the school an
estimated $12 million to $13 million per year.

At the time NBC President Ken Schanzer spoke in comically glowing terms
of the “elegance of the institution” and knowing that Irish officials
will “comport themselves in ways that make you proud to be associated
with them and allow you to live in the reflected glory of that
nobility.”

Assuming Comcast cares more about its bottom line than “reflected
glory,” the company could push to move some of Notre Dame’s lesser
games from NBC to its cable sports outlet, Versus. (Efforts to reach NBC
executives were not successful.) That might give Notre Dame another
impetus to seek the Big Ten’s greener pastures.

It’s not hard to see what angle Greenstein is attacking this story from. Whether its the anonymous industry analysts that are certain Notre Dame is a “money loser for NBC,” or the threat of moving lesser Notre Dame home games to little-seen networks like Versus, this might be the playbook for Big Ten propaganda, all in one snippet of a column. He even got a quote from Kirk Herbstreit, one of college football’s more sensible voices, but one that is un-apologetically pro-Big Ten.

There is a large segment of Notre Dame fans that will forever be hyper-critical of their favorite university and the administrators in charge. They were the first to chastise Swarbrick when the “seismic change” quote started getting publicity after a small meet-and-great at the Big East basketball tournament. They openly questioned his ability to work for Notre Dame while living in Indianapolis, or his “real” goal of chasing the NCAA president job while just moonlighting as Notre Dame’s AD. Yet in college football’s most fragile state, many with inside information are crediting Swarbrick as one of the key figures that stopped Armageddon from happening. 

Now about that Western Michigan game…

Five Irish players sign UFA contracts

Matthias Farley
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Notre Dame had seven players selected in the 2016 NFL Draft, trailing only Ohio State, Clemson and UCLA on the weekend tally. But after the draft finished, the Irish had five more players get their shot at playing on Sundays.

Chris Brown signed with the Dallas Cowboys. Romeo Okwara will begin his career with the New York Giants. Matthias Farley and Amir Carlisle signed contracts with the Arizona Cardinal. Elijah Shumate agreed to a contract with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

After missing two seasons, Ishaq Williams will be at Giants rookie camp next weekend as well, working as a tryout player. Expect Jarrett Grace to receive similar opportunities.

Count me among those that thought both Brown and Okwara would hear their names called. Brown’s senior season, not to mention his intriguing measureables, had some projecting him as early as the fifth round.

Okwara, still 20 years old and fresh off leading Notre Dame in sacks in back-to-back seasons, intrigued a lot of teams with his ability to play both defensive end and outside linebacker. He’ll get a chance to make the Giants—the team didn’t draft a defensive end after selecting just one last year, and they’re in desperate need of pass rushers.

Both Shumate and Farley feel like contenders to earn a spot on rosters, both because of their versatility and special teams skills. Shumate played nickel back as a freshman and improved greatly at safety during 2015. Farley bounced around everywhere and was Notre Dame’s special teams captain.

Carlisle might fit a similar mold. He played running back, receiver and returned kicks and punts throughout his college career. With a 4.4 during Notre Dame’s Pro Day, he likely showed the Cardinals enough to take a shot, and now he’ll join an offense with Michael Floyd and Troy Niklas.

 

Robertson picks Cal over Notre Dame, UGA

Demetris Robertson
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Demetris Robertson‘s decision wasn’t trending in Notre Dame’s direction. But those that expected the Savannah star athlete to pick the in-state Bulldogs were in for a surprise when Robertson chose Cal on Sunday afternoon.

Notre Dame’s pursuit of the five-star athlete, recruited to play outside receiver and hopefully replace Will Fuller, likely ended Sunday afternoon with Robertson making the surprise decision to take his substantial talents to Berkeley. And give credit to Robertson for doing what he said all along—picking a school that’ll give him the chance to earn an exceptional education and likely contribute from Day One.

“I am excited to take my talents to the University of California, Berkeley. The first reason is that the education was a big part of my decision. I wanted to keep that foundation,” Robertson said, per CFT. “When I went there, it felt like home. Me and the coaching staff have a great relationship. That’s where I felt were the best of all things for me.”

Adding one final twist in all of this is that Robertson has no letter-of-intent to sign. Because he’s blown three months through Signing Day, Robertson merely enrolls at a college when the time comes. That means until then, Kirby Smart and the Georgia staff will continue to sell Robertson on staying home and helping the Dawgs rebuild. Smart visited with Robertson Saturday night and had multiple assistant coaches at his track meet this weekend.

Summer school begins in June for Notre Dame. Their freshman receiving class looks complete with early enrollee Kevin Stepherson and soon-to-arrive pass-catchers Javon McKinley and Chase Claypool.

Sheldon Day drafted in 4th round by Jaguars

North Carolina v Notre Dame
Getty
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Former Notre Dame captain Sheldon Day didn’t have to wait long on Saturday to hear his name called. The Indianapolis native, All-American, and the Irish’s two-time defensive lineman of the year was pick number 103, the fourth pick of the fourth round on Saturday afternoon.

Day was the seventh Irish player drafted, following first rounders Ronnie Stanley and Will Fuller, second round selections Jaylon Smith and Nick Martin, and third rounders KeiVarae Russell and C.J. Prosise.

Day has a chance to contribute as he joins the 24th-ranked defense in the league. Joining a draft class heavy on defensive players—Jalen Ramsey, Myles Jack and Yannick Ngakoue already picked ahead of him—the front seven will also include last year’s No. 3 overall pick Dante Fowler, who missed the entire season with a knee injury.

Scouted by the Jaguars at the Senior Bowl, Day doesn’t necessarily have the size to be a traditional defensive tackle. But under Gus Bradley’s attacking system (Bradley coordinated the Seahawks defense for four seasons), Day will find a niche and a role in a young defense that’s seen a heavy investment the past two years.

Smith, Martin, Russell and Prosise all drafted Friday night

INDIANAPOLIS, IN - SEPTEMBER 13: William Fuller #7 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish and Nick Martin #72 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish celebrate a touchdown during the game against the Purdue Boilermakers at Lucas Oil Stadium on September 13, 2014 in Indianapolis, Indiana.  (Photo by Michael Hickey/Getty Images)
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Jaylon Smith, Nick Martin, KeiVarae Russell and C.J. Prosise were all selected on Friday, with four Irish teammates taken on the second night of the NFL Draft. As mentioned, Smith came off the board at pick 34, with the Cowboys gambling on the injured knee of the Butkus Award winner. Nick Martin was selected at pick 50, joining former teammate Will Fuller in Houston.

The third round saw Russell and Prosise come off the board, with Kansas City jumping on the confident cornerback and the Seahawks taking Notre Dame’s breakout running back. It capped off a huge night for the Irish with Sheldon Day, one of the more productive football players in college football, still on the board for teams to pick.

Here’s a smattering of instant reactions from the immediate aftermath.