The Good, the bad, the ugly: Purdue


There’s so much more good to be found here after recapping Notre Dame’s 23-12 victory over Purdue yesterday. While it’s clear that the Irish are still very much a work in progress, the key elements of a successful football team were there in spades at Notre Dame Stadium yesterday.

Not wanting to fill up the good ledger too much, I’ll cheat and give you my bullet-pointed version of some runner-up finishers in the positive position.

    * Bennett Jackson, kick-off covering dynamo.
    * David Ruffer, clutch kicker.
    * Gary Gray, tackling machine.
    * Braxston Cave, shotgun snapper.
    * Armando Allen & Cierre Wood, two-headed monster.
    * Clean play, no offensive or defensive penalties.

Now that I’ve cleared out the clutter, here’s a quick rundown of the good, the bad, and the ugly from the Purdue victory.


Bob Diaco’s defense. Four sacks, two interceptions, and legitimate pressure on the quarterback was a thing of beauty for Irish fans. While the ship has sailed, it’s a pleasant reminder that you don’t have to blitz every play to get to the quarterback. Utilizing a pretty effective front-three in Ethan Johnson, Kapron Lewis-Moore and Ian Williams, the Irish were able to chase after Robert Marve all day, even with Darius Fleming, the Irish’s best pass rusher, battling cramps on the sidelines for most of the game.

If you’re looking for the difference between this defense and the unit from last year, Purdue head coach Danny Hope has your answer.

“They blitzed almost every down last year and I thought that created some huge holes that we were able to take advantage of,” Hope said after the game. “They didn’t blitz as much, and so the holes were smaller. They had good personnel. I thought at times we blocked them and manufactured some offense, but the biggest difference was the amount of blitzes they used to use.”

Giving up 10 points to a team with Purdue’s offensive weapons is a great way to start your season, but it wasn’t all lollipops and rainbows for the defense, a group that will have plenty to discuss when breaking down film, particularly in the tackling department. But Purdue was an ideal opponent to start your season against, a spread team with a mobile quarterback, almost a perfect scouting tool for a Michigan offense that’ll bring an even more explosive running quarterback into South Bend next Saturday.


The Irish struggled in the red zone, missing a few key opportunities to score touchdowns and instead settled for field goals. Chalk that up to some potential first game jitters for Dayne Crist and an uncharacteristic fumble by Michael Floyd. Still, when the Irish go back and look at the tape, they’ll realize they left a lot of points on the board with missed throws to Michael Floyd and Kyle Rudolph. To his credit, Crist knows it.

“I’ll take responsibility for that,” Crist said. “That’s on me. We have got to continue to get better and I can only speak for myself and those things will be corrected.”

Last year, the Irish struggled converting touchdowns in the red zone as well, finishing a mediocre 65th in the country by only converting 56 percent of appearances into touchdowns, a pretty puzzling number when you consider the offensive weapons the Irish had. Contrast that with Cincinnati’s 2009 offense, which was a sterling 7th in the country, converting over 72 percent of trips into six points. The Irish will improve as Crist get’s comfortable, but expect the red zone to be a point of emphasis this week.


While I didn’t see it, the College GameDay preview piece on ESPN created quite a stir amongst readers. After watching it, I’m pretty surprised this got the green-light to be aired. Written by ESPN senior writer Wright Thompson, you’d think that Notre Dame was closing down the football program, instead of being the team that played in two BCS bowls the past five years.

If you want to feel like you’ve been stuck in Shawshank prison with Red and Andy for the past 20 years and they just took all the books out of the library, give it a watch.

Other than that, I’m struggling to find anything too ugly about an opening day victory for Notre Dame. The best I’ve come up with was the outfit choice by Brian Kelly and the coaching staff. They looked like bottles of Dijon mustard out there. While the golden helmets of the Fighting Irish are one of college football’s classic looks, the “golden” fleece is far from it. Stick with the blue or white, guys.

Even amidst chaos, Kelly expecting USC’s best

JuJu Smith-Schuster, Rocky Hayes, Blaise Taylor

USC head coach Steve Sarkisian was fired on Monday, with interim head coach Clay Helton taking the reins of the Trojan program during tumultuous times. Helton will be the fourth different USC head coach to face Notre Dame in as many years, illustrative of the chaos that’s shaken up Heritage Hall in the years since Pete Carroll left for the NFL.

All eyes are on the SC program, with heat on athletic director Pat Haden and the ensuing media circus that only Los Angeles can provide. But Brian Kelly doesn’t expect anything but their best when USC boards a plane to take on the Irish in South Bend.

While the majority of Notre Dame’s focus will be inward this week, Kelly did take the time on Sunday and Monday to talk with his team about the changes atop the Trojan program, and how they’ll likely impact the battle for the Jeweled Shillelagh.

“We talked about there would be an interim coach, and what that means,” Kelly said. “Teams come together under those circumstances and they’re going to play their very best. And I just reminded them of that.”

While nobody on this Notre Dame roster has experienced a coaching change, they’ve seen their share of scrutiny. The Irish managed to spring an upset not many saw coming against LSU last year in the Music City Bowl after a humiliating defeat against the Trojans and amidst the chaos of a quarterbacking controversy. And just last week, we saw Charlie Strong’s team spring an upset against arch rival Oklahoma when just about everybody left the Longhorns for dead.

“I think you look at the way Texas responded this past weekend with a lot of media scrutiny,” Kelly said Tuesday. “I expect USC to respond the same way, so we’re going to have to play extremely well.”

Outside of the head coaching departure, it’s difficult to know if there’ll be any significant difference between a team lead by Sarkisian or the one that Helton will lead into battle. The offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach has been at USC for six years, and has already held the title of interim head coach when he led the Trojans to a 2013 Las Vegas Bowl title after Lane Kiffin was fired and Ed Orgeron left the program after he wasn’t given the full time position.

Helton will likely call plays, a role he partially handled even when Sarkisian was on the sideline. The defense will still be run by Justin Wilcox. And more importantly, the game plan will be executed by a group of players that are among the most talented in the country.

“They have some of the finest athletes in the country. I’ve recruited a lot of them, and they have an immense amount of pride for their program and personal pride,” Kelly said. “So they will come out with that here at Notre Dame, there is no question about that.”

Irish add commitment from CB Donte Vaughn

Donte Vaughn

Notre Dame’s recruiting class grew on Monday. And in adding 6-foot-3 Memphis cornerback Donte Vaughn, it grew considerably.

The Irish added another jumbo-sized skill player in Vaughn, beating out a slew of SEC offers for the intriguing cover man. Vaughn picked Notre Dame over offers from Auburn, LSU, Miami, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, Tennessee and Texas A&M among others.

He made the announcement on Monday, his 18th birthday:

It remains to be seen if Vaughn can run like a true cornerback. But his length certainly gives him a skill-set that doesn’t currently exist on the Notre Dame roster.

Interestingly enough, Vaughn’s commitment comes a cycle after Brian VanGorder made news by going after out-of-profile coverman Shaun Crawford, immediately offering the 5-foot-9 cornerback after taking over for Bob Diaco, who passed because of Crawford’s size. An ACL injury cut short Crawford’s freshman season before it got started, but not before Crawford already proved he’ll be a valuable piece of the Irish secondary for years to come.

Vaughn is another freaky athlete in a class that already features British Columbia’s Chase Claypool. With a safety depth chart that’s likely turning over quite a bit in the next two seasons, Vaughn can clearly shift over if that’s needed, though Notre Dame adding length like Vaughn clearly points to some of the shifting trends after Richard Sherman went from an average wide receiver to one of the best cornerbacks in football, and Vaughn will be asked to play on the outside.

Vaughn is the 15th member of Notre Dame’s 2016 signing class. He is the fifth defensive back, joining safeties D.J. Morgan, Jalen Elliott and Spencer Perry along with cornerback Julian Love. The Irish project to take one more.

With Notre Dame expecting another huge recruiting weekend with USC coming to town, it’ll be very interesting to see how the Irish staff close out this recruiting class.