Five things we learned: Notre Dame vs. Boston College

80 Comments

A win is a win is a win. It wasn’t particularly good looking, but Brian Kelly and the Fighting Irish got back on the right side of the ledger this evening in Boston, coasting to a 31-13 win over Boston College, a team searching even harder for an identity than Notre Dame.

While the rivalry between Notre Dame and Boston College always seems to end up in down-to-the-wire finishes, the Irish exploded for three early touchdowns before coasting in for the victory, showing Irish fans what the offense is capable of when executed properly, but also frustrating those same fans with self-inflicted mistakes that almost let the Eagles climb off the mat and back into the game.

But behind quarterbacks Chase Rettig and Mike Marscovetra the Eagles couldn’t find a rhythm on offense, gaining only five total yards on the ground and relying completely on a passing game that was far too inconsistent to be dangerous.

In a Holy War rivalry that’s been hotly contested the past decade, this game had many similarities to the 2008 match-up, only this time it was Boston College’s offense that was held in check by the opposition’s defense and Notre Dame that did enough to coast to a victory.

In the end, Notre Dame gets an easy victory at night in Chestnut Hill, something that should never be discounted. While they won’t get any style points, the Irish improve to 2-3, and now head home with a chance to get back to .500 against Pitt.

Here’s what we learned during Notre Dame’s 31-13 win.

1. The Irish offense was ready for the opening bell.

With most of the fan base worried, the Irish offense opened quickly in the first quarter, putting together three touchdown drives in their opening four possessions and putting the game essentially out of reach in the first eleven minutes of the evening.

The decision to move Bennett Jackson into the kick return game was immediately rewarded when the lanky freshman scampered for 43 yards on the opening kickoff and gave Notre Dame great field position. Behind solid running from Armando Allen, and a zone-read keeper for Dayne Crist, the Irish got out of the blocks perfectly, starting quickly and getting a much-needed red zone touchdown.

Of the Irish’s three touchdown drives, the longest was 3:38, and they were the product of the Irish offense taking care of business and the Irish defense overwhelming a absolutely mediocre Eagles offense.

2. The Irish offensive line rallied after last week’s disappointing performance.

While the number don’t necessarily reflect it, the offensive line did a nice job establishing a running game. From the opening kickoff, the linemen cleared the way, with Armando Allen’s 90 yards on 19 carries a pretty good day at the office. And while Dayne Crist never really truly got on track in the pocket, the offensive line protected him well, giving up only one sack the entire evening. The line handled the crowd noise in Alumni Stadium flawlessly and also only committed one penalty, a declined holding call on Chris Stewart.

If defenses are going to continue to try and drop players into coverage to take away the Irish passing game, it’ll be up to the offensive line to create running lanes for the backs and protect Crist long enough to find open receivers.

3. Carlo Calabrese is becoming a very good football player.

Brian Kelly discussed it earlier in the week, but Carlo Calabrese probably played his best game in a Notre Dame uniform this evening. Calabrese led the Irish in tackles and also in tackles for loss with 3.5, and chipped in a sack for good measure. At a position that looked completely unstable during preseason camp, Calabrese has become a rock on the inside — a run-stuffing battering ram that plays incredibly tough on the interior of the defense while also playing more than good enough defense against the pass. It’s the work of Calabrese, Manti Te’o, and defensive tackle Ian Williams that held Montel Harris and the Boston College rushing attack to single-digit yardage, quite an achievement for a team that came into the evening ranked 98th in the country against the run.

4. The Irish won the game by being good at the little things.

The easy answer to the Irish win might be Boston College head coach Frank Spaziani’s refusal to put Dave Shinskie into the game after both Chase Rettig and Mike Marscovetra struggled, but if you’re looking for two key statistics on why the Irish won easily, look at penalties and third downs.

The Irish only committed two penalties for 22 yards while Boston College was hit with 12 penalties for 120 yards. In a game where Notre Dame only had 315 total yards and BC was held to 270, spotting a team an extra 25 percent of their total yardage is a very good way to give away a football game, something Boston College did by committing multiple personal foul infractions. While the three Notre Dame turnovers makes you forget that the Irish avoided the mistakes that have plagued them over the first month of the season, committing only two penalties — one that came on the final drive of the game — is a very nice sign for Kelly’s Irish.

The other key stat that has to have people feeling better about the Irish, is their margin of victory on third down conversions. The Irish converted 8 of 19 third down attempts, not an entirely great night on 3rd down, but excellent when you compare it to what Boston College did. The Irish held BC to just four of 19 on their third downs, forcing the Eagles to punt 11 times, and the Irish D consistently got off the field on third down, something that was a complete problem area for the Irish last week.

5. The Irish are poised to build on this victory.

It’s easy to downplay this victory because of the ebbs and flows of the evening, but there were plenty of good things for the Irish to build on Saturday night. With the Irish’s back against the wall, Notre Dame came out swinging and effectively knocked Boston College out of the game in the opening minutes of the evening. Those three quick strikes remind Irish fans that Notre Dame is picking up the elements of the offense, and with explosive downfield passes to Theo Riddick and Michael Floyd, the offense is slowly but surely coming around.

Defensively, holding any team to 0.2 yards per carry is a victory that has to have the Irish feeling better about their run defense as they prepare to face a Pitt team that features one of the more dangerous running backs in the country. And other than Gary Gray’s blown-coverage on Bobby Swigert’s double-move, the Irish intercepted two passes and held BC quarterbacks to an incredibly inefficient night passing. (On his Twitter page this evening, Gray apologized for the touchdown pass: “My bad on the double move. Fool me once shame on them, fool me twice shame on me.”) Robert Blanton played another excellent game, coming up with a great deflection and interception, and the Irish coaches should feel like they have three rock-solid cornerbacks. Safety Dan McCarthy showed up around the ball plenty in the second half in his first extended tour of duty in the secondary, a welcome site for those that are worried that Harrison Smith and Zeke Motta could be running out of gas. (Even Harrison Smith had an interception…) Irish fans also might have gotten a look at their pass rusher of the future, when Prince Shembo came off the edge twice to sack Boston College quarterbacks, providing two of the five Irish sacks that the defense put together.

More important that any individual effort, the Irish came away with a much needed win in a rivalry game, and did so in an incredibly comfortable fashion. There was no heart-burn tonight, only a quick flurry to open the evening and the Irish controlling the tempo of the game until the very end. With 2-2 Pitt coming to town, the Irish should be favored as they try to get back to level par on the year before a much needed week off. While
3-3 wasn’t what many of us
projected, removing the possibility of 1-4 was all that anybody could’ve asked for tonight.   

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 47 (theoretically) Kofi Wardlow, defensive end

Rivals.com
5 Comments

Listed Measurements: 6-foot-3, 210 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Freshman yet to enroll
Depth chart: Wardlow joins a youth movement among pass-rushers. Given their time already spent on campus and in practice, though, three sophomores remain ahead of Wardlow at defensive end. Even among those three, Daelin Hayes, Julian Okwara and Ade Ogundeji will have to scrap for playing time.
Recruiting: A consensus three-star recruit, Wardlow switched from a Maryland commitment at the last possible moment, making his decision on National Signing Day. The No. 47 defensive end in the country per rivals.com, Wardlow also considered offers from Michigan State and Virginia Tech.

QUOTE(S)
Irish coach Brian Kelly received word during his National Signing Day press conference he could announce Wardlow’s commitment. To some extent, Kelly expected that chance, but it was still assuredly a moment of relief to confirm the 21st and final member of the 2017 recruiting class.

“A new guy has come in, Kofi Wardlow, defensive end,” Kelly said. “We were looking for one more pass-rusher. We think Kofi has some elite skills at the defensive end position where he can grow and develop. We really liked his athleticism and his size, really impressed with him in person.

“… He really fit the profile. He reminded us of a young Romeo Okwara, not quite as long, but is actually thicker than [Okwara] is. He’s just a really young, raw, extremely athletic guy, a guy that we think can develop into a really nice edge player for us.”

WHAT WE SAID WHEN WARDLOW’S NATIONAL LETTER OF INTENT ARRIVED
Bolstering the edge rush is never a bad thing, especially in a class with only one other defensive end. Wardlow completes this Notre Dame recruiting cycle on a high note, and even that psychological factor alone should not be underrated.

“Wardlow has played football for only two seasons, focusing on basketball in the past. Naturally, that leaves him with as much raw potential as realized. Furthermore, that basketball background established a level of agility and understanding of footwork not often seen from players of Wardlow’s size.”

2017 OUTLOOK
With only two falls of football to his name, it would be in Wardlow’s best interests to spend a season preserving eligibility and developing a deeper understanding of the game, not to mention a more college-ready physicality. That is also the most-likely scenario, unless it is deemed he is needed on special teams. For these purposes, let’s presume that will not be the case. Irish special teams coordinator Brian Polian has openly wanted more bodies for his units, but in doing so he referred to linebackers and safeties. Wardlow may have a lithe body, but he is very much a defensive end, not a linebacker.

DOWN THE ROAD
Kelly’s comparison to Okwara bodes well for Wardlow. Okwara is one of the better success stories when it comes to player development in recent memory. That distinction is not limited to Notre Dame. Okwara’s rise would stand out anywhere, considering he is now a viable contributor on an NFL defensive line.

It took a few years for Okwara to get ready for the collegiate game, though. He arrived unbelievably raw, largely due to his youth. (Okwara was younger than many players in the recruiting class a year behind him.) Wardlow arrives similarly unpolished, but more due to his short playing career to date.

Thus, patience may be required when it comes to Wardlow. Considering the development he showed between his first and second years of football, though, that patience should lead to reward. That high school development was enough to attract quick offers from a number of strong collegiate programs. Continuing at that rate would have Wardlow following Okwara exactly as Kelly hopes.


Aside from the five early enrollees, the numbers are not yet known for the Irish freshmen class. That is one of the admitted drawbacks to organizing this summer-long series numerically. But a little bit of educated guessing can garner estimates for those numbers, and those estimates can allow the series to proceed without pause.</em

How are those estimates crafted? The first step is to take a look at certain NCAA rules, but the NCAA does not put recommendations on defensive players, broadening Wardlow’s options. With Kelly comparing Wardlow to Romeo Okwara, slotting him in close to Okwara’s former number of 45 seemed fitting.

Kofi Wardlow very well may not wear No. 47, but it is possible.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92 (theoretically): Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 90 (theoretically): Cole Kmet, tight end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87 (theoretically): Jafar Armstrong, receiver
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84 (theoretically): Michael Young, receiver
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 73: (theoretically) Josh Lugg, offensive tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 65: (theoretically) Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center
No. 53: Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman
No. 52: (theoretically) Jonathan Doerer, kicker
No. 48: Greer Martini, inside linebacker

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 48 Greer Martini, inside linebacker

Getty Images
12 Comments

Listed Measurements: 6-foot-3 ½, 240 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Senior with only one season of eligibility remaining
Depth chart: Martini will start as an inside linebacker alongside classmate and fellow captain Nyles Morgan. Junior Te’von Coney provides plenty of motivation and support behind Martini.
Recruiting: Martini committed to Notre Dame following his sophomore year of high school, limiting the number of other offers he received. A rivals.com three-star prospect, Martini had already been offered by Maryland and North Carolina State when he made the decision he would not waver from.

CAREER TO DATE
Martini began contributing to the Irish defense from day one, making two tackles in his freshman season-opener against Rice in 2014. Since then, his season totals have risen from year-to-year, even though his starts have remained sporadic. Last season, for example, captain James Onwualu started ahead of Martini, and Coney saw plenty of action, as well, finishing with 62 tackles himself. Martini, meanwhile, made 55, including seven tackles for loss, the most for a returning member of the Notre Dame defense, just ahead of Morgan’s six.

Martini did undergo shoulder surgery last offseason, giving Onwualu and Coney more reps throughout 2016’s spring practice.

Martini has particularly excelled against option-attack offenses, most notably Navy’s. In each of the last three seasons, his season-high for single-game tackles came against the Midshipmen, nine in each of 2014 and 2015, and 11 last year.

2014: 13 games, two starts (Navy and USC), 26 tackles including two for loss and one sack v. Louisville.
2015: 13 games, four starts, 35 tackles including 2.5 for loss and one sack v. Stanford.
2016: 12 games, four starts, 55 tackles including seven for loss and three sacks, with two sacks coming v. Stanford.

QUOTE(S)
Healthy and presumably a clear-cut starter, Martini was not much of a topic this spring. In listing off positional battles halfway through spring practice, Irish coach Brian Kelly included Martini and Coney. Without reading too much into that, it should be a promising sign for Coney more than anything else.

WHAT KEITH ARNOLD PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
I’m not sure how he’ll do it, but I expect Martini to take the second-most snaps of any linebacker behind Nyles Morgan. The logic is fuzzy — senior James Onwualu will likely be the starting Sam linebacker — and the Irish staff believes in talented sophomore Te’von Coney. But there are just so many things that Martini is good at, and keeping him on the field makes too much sense.

“Productivity wise, I’m expecting a jump as well. We’ve seen Martini thrive against option opponents. Add in run-heavy opponents like Nevada, Michigan State and Army to the slate, and too many arrows point to opportunities for Martini. I expect him to seize them.”

2017 OUTLOOK
Martini has done all that has been asked of him on the field. With an even more prominent role in the defense this year, there is no reason not to expect such to continue. That should include another bump up in his tackle totals.

Four of the top-five Irish tacklers from a year ago return, with Martini being the fourth. He may not pass Morgan (94) or senior rover Drue Tranquill (79), but he could pass Coney. Even if Martini doesn’t do that, the combination of the two should join Morgan quite well in creating a consistent and productive inside linebacker tandem.

Having excelled against run-heavy opponents in the past, Martini will most likely post his biggest tackle totals against the likes of Georgia, Michigan State and Navy.

DOWN THE ROAD
Finishing his Notre Dame career with 200 or so tackles (currently at 116), Martini will have exceeded most expectations from four years ago. Continuing that trend will be difficult considering his size, but given his success defending against the run, a possible NFL minicamp invite could assuredly open the door toward a professional stint.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92 (theoretically): Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 90 (theoretically): Cole Kmet, tight end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87 (theoretically): Jafar Armstrong, receiver
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84 (theoretically): Michael Young, receiver
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 73: (theoretically) Josh Lugg, offensive tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 65: (theoretically) Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center
No. 53: Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman
No. 52: (theoretically) Jonathan Doerer, kicker

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 52 (theoretically) Jonathan Doerer, kicker

UND.com
14 Comments

Listed Measurements: 6-foot-3, 188 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Incoming freshman with four years of eligibility remaining
Depth chart: Notre Dame has an established kicker in junior Justin Yoon, but Doerer could take over the kickoff duties for the Irish this fall.
Recruiting: Doerer switched his commitment from Maryland to Notre Dame only the weekend before National Signing Day.

QUOTE(S)
Irish coach Brian Kelly said Doerer’s abilities in kickoffs changed Notre Dame’s plans regarding pursuing a kicker this past recruiting cycle.

“We weren’t necessarily looking for one, but [Doerer] just jumped out at us,” Kelly said on National Signing Day. “Somebody with his numbers, his ability, his length, 6-foot-3, [an] extremely-gifted athlete. We were looking for somebody that could take over the kickoff duties for us right away.

“The strength that he has averaging 78-plus [yards] kicking the football with four-plus [seconds] hang time, just crazy numbers. It was just too good to pass up for us. He was a great fit for us. We went into that with really no expectations to go after a kicker until we saw him and fell in love with his ability.”

WHAT WE SAID WHEN DOERER’S NATIONAL LETTER OF INTENT ARRIVED
A late addition to this class, Doerer might find the field in 2017 amid injury speculation around incumbent kicker Justin Yoon. There was a time any special teams recruit brought much skepticism from the masses. That time has passed, and Doerer should not rekindle it.

“During today’s und.com programming, Irish coach Brian Kelly said he expects Doerer to take over the kickoff duties, if not more, due to his strong leg’s consistent ability to send the ball out of the end zone.”

2017 OUTLOOK
Expect Doerer to handle kickoffs from the outset and retain that duty until/unless it goes awry. Yoon’s injury concerns should be in the past by September, but allowing him to focus on placekicks could hold value for Notre Dame. Hence, Kelly welcomed the chance to fill a scholarship slot with Doerer.

Somewhere here, so about here, there should be mention of senior walk-on kicker Sam Kohler. Following the Blue-Gold Game, Kelly praised Kohler.

“Sam’s been solid,” Kelly said, echoing sentiments from special teams coordinator Brian Polian from earlier in the spring. “He really has. [I] like the way he prepares and works at it. We’ve got more competition coming in, so it will be a good situation. We’ll have a real good competition there.”

Will Kohler prevent Doerer from swinging his leg in games this fall? Most likely not, but Kohler could provide another option in the kicking game should it be needed.

DOWN THE ROAD
Yoon has two more years of eligibility, including 2017. If Doerer does indeed take over kickoff duties this fall, that will leave two years of separation between the two kickers. Come 2019, Doerer should be in prime position — and, with two years of work in a collegiate conditioning program, prime shape — to take over all three facets of the kicking game in point after attempts, field goals and kickoffs.

Senior punter Tyler Newsome also has two years of eligibility remaining, giving some time for both Doerer and the Irish coaches to consider if they want him to develop that skill, as well.


Aside from the five early enrollees, the numbers are not yet known for the incoming Irish freshmen. A little educated guessing can garner estimates for those numbers, and those estimates allow the proceedings to continue sans pause.

When it comes to a kicker, however, that educated guessing is rather akin to throwing darts in the dark. Doerer’s number could end up being nearly anywhere between 1 and 99, though it is also among the most unlikely to double up on another player’s digits. With that in mind, No. 52 seemed as good a placeholder as any.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92 (theoretically): Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 90 (theoretically): Cole Kmet, tight end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87 (theoretically): Jafar Armstrong, receiver
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84 (theoretically): Michael Young, receiver
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 73: (theoretically) Josh Lugg, offensive tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 65: (theoretically) Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center
No. 53: Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 53 Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman

Rivals.com
20 Comments

Listed Measurements: 6-foot-4, 267 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Sophomore with three years of eligibility remaining including 2017
Depth chart: Kareem currently lines up at defensive end behind seniors Jay Hayes and Andrew Trumbetti. It is conceivable he switches sides to the boundary half of the field where he would contend with classmates Daelin Hayes, Julian Okwara and Ade Ogundeji. Either way, playing time could be tough to come by this fall for Kareem.
Recruiting: A consensus four-star prospect, Kareem first committed to Michigan State before flipping to Alabama. All reports indicate both Kareem and Alabama wanted to go separate ways, leading the No. 237 prospect in the country, per rivals.com, to enroll early at Notre Dame. The No. 8 recruit in Michigan and No. 17 defensive end in the country, he also held offers from Ohio State and Stanford.

CAREER TO DATE
In a surprise to some, Kareem saw action in four games last season, recording no statistics. Irish coach Brian Kelly has pointed out before it is rare for premier defensive linemen to stay for a fifth year in college, and if he views Kareem’s future with those possibilities in mind, it is possible that was part of the logic in playing Kareem against Nevada, Duke, Syracuse and Virginia Tech.

QUOTE(S)
Kelly specifically praised Kareem twice in April as spring practice neared its conclusion. Neither acknowledgement was lengthy, but perhaps the brevity speaks to the sincerity.

“Khalid Kareem has done some nice things for us,” Kelly said before adding two weeks later, “Khalid Kareem has gotten better each and every day he’s been out there.”

WHAT KEITH ARNOLD PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
I think Kareem sees the field this year, even if it’s just in a supporting role. He could be some much-needed depth behind Isaac Rochell, who could be used in multiple positions to help maximize his abilities.

“There is so much to like about Kareem’s skill-set and his opportunity once Rochell graduates. If he continues to grow he can slide inside and provide a havoc-wreakor in the trenches. If he can keep his speed, he’s got a chance to be a starter as a sophomore when Rochell moves on to the NFL.

“Maybe it’s because he enrolled early or because his recruitment had some roller coaster elements. But for all the groaning and grumbling about a lack of defensive ends in recruiting, if all goes according to plan the Irish could’ve landed two elite starters at defensive end for multiple seasons (out of the state of Michigan, no less) with Kareem and Daelin Hayes.”

2017 OUTLOOK
For this exercise, let’s presume Kareem does not preserve a year of eligibility this season to compensate for the somewhat unnecessary playing time last year. It is a possibility, though a slim one at that.

The reason it is a possibility is it is hard to project where Kareem finds playing time this fall. Trumbetti has shown the ability to contribute when healthy, and Jay Hayes impressed this spring. Switching to compete with Daelin Hayes, Okwara and Ogundeji may remove the upperclassmen’s experience to compete with, but those three all present large amounts of potential. Someone will see a slim number of snaps this fall, and Kareem seems most likely to suffer that fate at this point.

The fact of the matter, though, is the Notre Dame defensive line needs playmakers. If Kareem forces the issue, defensive coordinator Mike Elko and defensive line coach Mike Elston will find him playing time, even if it means moving Kareem inside to supplement the shallow depths at tackle. That may be outside the box, but the Irish interior may need some innovative thinking.

DOWN THE ROAD
Jay Hayes has another year of eligibility after 2017, but Trumbetti will be done after this season. Kareem will have his chance, especially with the incoming freshman class not providing ready competition at end. By no means is that meant to diminish Jonathan MacCollister — only intending to say he may need some time.

Kareem was a heralded recruit. A season or two spent largely on the sidelines is no reason to dismiss those projections.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92 (theoretically): Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 90 (theoretically): Cole Kmet, tight end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87 (theoretically): Jafar Armstrong, receiver
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84 (theoretically): Michael Young, receiver
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 73: (theoretically) Josh Lugg, offensive tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 65: (theoretically) Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship