IBG: Let’s talk Utah

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The Irish Blogger Gathering reconvenes after the bye weekend, with Anthony Pilcher of Clashmore Mike supplying the questions.

If you’ve missed this feature throughout the year, you’ll catch up soon enough. AP asks the questions, we’ll do the answering. For a wide variety of answers, check them out here:

1. Notre Dame is 4-5 with three games left in the season. First, are you surprised by the wins and losses so far? And second, given how the Irish have played, what is a realistic expectation for the remainder of the season?

Surprised? Not really. After analyzing, rewatching, and reconsidering how the Irish got where they are, it’s pretty easy to see how they found their way to 4-5. That said, yeah — I pegged the Irish for a much better season, and I was more bullish than just about everyone else out there.

That said, even with the offense missing just about every important skill player this side of Michael Floyd, I think the Irish are going to find a way to win two of the last three games, extending their season and earning some much needed additional practice. If they do end up in a bowl game, this year is a success, especially considering the turmoil and turnover that happened on the offensive side of the ball.

2. A little report card in the spirit of the bye week. What player or position unit has been the biggest surprise of the year and what player/position unit has been the biggest disappointment?

While I’d like to name Carlo Calabrese or David Ruffer as the biggest surprise (Ruffer would run away with this if I didn’t disqualify him for being a kicker), I’m going to give the Z receiver position some respect. While Theo Riddick got off to a slow start, he started to put together a dynamic season before being cut down by injury. With Riddick out with ankle problems, TJ Jones picked up the slack, and has helped to give Irish fans a peek into the post-Michael Floyd future at Notre Dame. Considering that the offense was learning a new system with a newbie quarterback in Dayne Crist, Riddick was learning a brand new position, and Jones was just — well, brand new, the production the Irish have gotten out of the slot has been great.

As for disappointing, the outside linebackers have really been underwhelming. I expected Darius Fleming to have a breakout season, becoming one of the most dynamic players on the field every time the Irish played. While Fleming has shown flashes of brilliance, he’s hardly been the player Notre Dame needed at the hybrid OLB/DE position, and hasn’t become the stalwart that Bob Diaco’s system has produced in the past.

Neither Brian Smith nor Kerry Neal has played great football at the field linebacker position. Too often Neal or Smith found themselves with their eyes in the backfield and contain lost, often times turning a play into a big gain with the Irish outside backers losing leverage on the edge. Steve Filer has once again been a special teams standout, but he’s yet to make a difference in a three down situation, something most Irish fans hoped would happen.

3. Defensive coordinator Bob Diaco caught plenty of flack after the debacle against Navy, and rightly so. But his unit bounced back with arguably their best performance of the year against a prolific Tulsa offense. So which version is the real Diaco? Is it the one that had no answer against Navy? Or is the one that had his troops prepared against Tulsa (and most other Irish opponents)?

I’m staying on the Bob Diaco bandwagon until I’m forced to jump off it, just because I’ve been in the room with Diaco and seen first hand the effect he has on players. The loss to Navy was one of his worst Saturdays Diaco has had as a coach, and I’m certain that the Irish coaching staff will learn from their undressing against Navy.

For those already concluding that Diaco is just an overwhelmed assistant not ready for the big stage, take a look back at what veteran coordinator Jon Tenuta did with a defense comprised of the same players, that happened to stay healthy throughout last year.

Diaco only gets one mulligan this year, and he used it against Navy. But the defense has played much better this season, and more importantly, is getting great effort — something that wasn’t a given last year.

4. Off the heals of a near miss against Air Force, Utah was undressed by TCU in their first “real” test of the season. Are the Utes pretenders and does Notre Dame have a shot at winning Saturday? What will be the key matchup(s) next week in South Bend?

I’ll defer to the stats when discussing the schedule Utah has played so far, but the game will be decided by Tommy Rees’ ability to move the ball against Utah’s defense. If Rees can help the Irish move the ball, and avoids some of the killer turnovers that happened last week, then I think the Irish can win this weekend.

Obviously, the Irish don’t have the defense TCU had, but they were given a great blueprint on how to beat the Utes. Notre Dame will need solid defensive play, a competent running game, and a win in the special teams battle. This could be Brian Kelly’s first chance to win a game he shouldn’t with the Irish. If he gets it done with Tommy Rees at the helm, he’ll have earned his keep for the week.


Go for two or not? Both sides of the highly-debated topic

during their game at Clemson Memorial Stadium on October 3, 2015 in Clemson, South Carolina.

Notre Dame’s two failed two-point conversion tries against Clemson have been the source of much debate in the aftermath of the Irish’s 24-22 loss to the Tigers. Brian Kelly’s decision to go for two with just over 14 minutes left in the game forced the Irish into another two-point conversion attempt with just seconds left in regulation, with DeShone Kizer falling short as he attempted to push the game into overtime.

Was Kelly’s decision to go for two the right one at the beginning of the fourth quarter? That depends.

Take away the result—a pass that flew through the fingers of a wide open Corey Robinson. Had the Irish kicked their extra point, Justin Yoon would’ve trotted onto the field with a chance to send the game into overtime. (Then again, had Robinson caught the pass, Notre Dame would’ve been kicking for the win in the final seconds…)

This is the second time a two-point conversion decision has opened Kelly up to second guessing in the past eight games. Last last season, Kelly’s decision to go for two in the fourth-quarter with an 11-point lead against Northwestern, came back to bite the Irish and helped the Wildcats stun Notre Dame in overtime.

That choice was likely fueled by struggles in the kicking game, heightened by Kyle Brindza’s blocked extra-point attempt in the first half, a kick returned by Northwestern that turned a 14-7 game into a 13-9 lead. With a fourth-quarter, 11-point lead, the Irish failed to convert their two-point attempt that would’ve stretched their lead to 13 points. After Northwestern converted their own two-point play, they made a game-tying field goal after Cam McDaniel fumbled the ball as the Irish were running out the clock. Had the Irish gone for (and converted) a PAT, the Wildcats would’ve needed to score a touchdown.

Moving back to Saturday night, Kelly’s decision needs to be put into context. After being held to just three points for the first 45 minutes of the game, C.J. Prosise broke a long catch and run for a touchdown in the opening minute of the fourth quarter. Clemson would be doing their best to kill the clock. Notre Dame’s first touchdown of the game brought the score within 12 points when Kelly decided to try and push the score within 10—likely remembering the very way Northwestern forced overtime.

After the game, Kelly said it was the right decision, citing his two-point conversion card and the time left in the game. On his Sunday afternoon teleconference, he said the same, giving a bit more rationale for his decision.

“We were down and we got the chance to put that game into a two-score with a field goal. I don’t chase the points until the fourth quarter, and our mathematical chart, which I have on the sideline with me and we have a senior adviser who concurred with me, and we said go for two. It says on our chart to go for two.

“We usually don’t use the chart until the fourth quarter because, again, we don’t chase the points. We went for two to make it a 10-point game. So we felt we had the wind with us so we would have to score a touchdown and a field goal because we felt like we probably only had three more possessions.

“The way they were running the clock, we’d probably get three possessions maximum and we’re going to have to score in two out of the three. So it was the smart decision to make, it was the right one to make. Obviously, you know, if we catch the two-point conversion, which was wide open, then we just kick the extra point and we’ve got a different outcome.”

That logic and rationale is why I had no problem with the decision when it happened in real time. But not everybody agrees.

Perhaps the strongest rebuke of the decision came from Irish Illustrated’s Tim Prister, who had this to say about the decision in his (somewhat appropriately-titled) weekly Point After column:

Hire another analyst or at least assign someone to the task of deciphering the Beautiful Mind-level math problem that seems to be vexing the Notre Dame brain-trust when a dweeb with half-inch thick glasses and a pocket protector full of pens could tell you that in the game of football, you can’t chase points before it is time… (moving ahead)

…The more astonishing thing is that no one in the ever-growing football organization that now adds analysts and advisors on a regular basis will offer the much-needed advice. Making such decisions in the heat of battle is not easy. What one thinks of in front of the TV or in a press box does not come as clearly when you’re the one pulling the trigger for millions to digest.

And yet with this ever-expanding entourage, Notre Dame still does not have anyone who can scream through the headphones to the head coach, “Coach, don’t go for two!”

If someone, anyone within the organization had the common sense and then the courage to do so, the Irish wouldn’t have lost every game in November of 2014 and would have had a chance to win in overtime against Clemson Saturday night.

My biggest gripe about the decision was the indecision that came along with the choice. Scoring on a big-play tends to stress your team as special teams players shuffle onto the field and the offense comes off. But Notre Dame’s use of a timeout was a painful one, and certainly should’ve been spared considering the replay review that gave Notre Dame’s coaching staff more time to make a decision.

For what it’s worth, Kelly’s decision was probably similar to the one many head coaches would make. And it stems from the original two-point conversion chart that Dick Vermeil developed back in the 1970s.

The original chart didn’t account for success rate or time left in the game. As Kelly mentioned before, Notre Dame uses one once it’s the fourth quarter.

It’s a debate that won’t end any time soon. And certainly one that will have hindsight on the side of the “kick the football” argument.



Navy, Notre Dame will display mutual respect with uniforms

Keenan Reynolds, Isaac Rochell

The storied and important history of Notre Dame and Navy’s long-running rivalry will be on display this weekend, with the undefeated Midshipmen coming to South Bend this weekend.

On NBCSN, a half-hour documentary presentation will take a closer look, with “Onward Notre Dame: Mutual Respect” talking about everything from Notre Dame’s 43-year winning streak, to Navy’s revival, triggered by their victory in 2007. The episode will also talk about the rivalries ties to World War II, and how the Navy helped keep Notre Dame alive during wartime.

You can catch it on tonight at 6:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN or online in the same viewing window.

On the field, perhaps an even more unique gesture of respect is planned. With Under Armour the apparel partner for both Notre Dame and Navy, both teams will take the field wearing the same cleats, gloves and baselayers. Each team’s coaching staff will also be outfitted in the same sideline gear.

More from Monday’s press release:

For the first time in college football, two opponents take the field with the exact same Under Armour baselayer, gloves and cleats to pay homage to the storied history and brotherhood between their two schools. The baselayer features both Universities’ alma maters on the sleeves and glove palms with the words “respect, honor, tradition” as a reminder of their connection to each other. Both sidelines and coaches also will wear the same sideline gear as a sign of mutual admiration.​

Navy and Notre Dame will meet for the 89th time on Saturday, a rivalry that dates back to 1927. After the Midshipmen won three of four games starting in 2007, Notre Dame hopes to extend their current winning streak to five games on Saturday.

Here’s an early look at some of the gear: