Floyd’s NFL decision not so cut and dry


It’s not like we didn’t see this coming.

From the first Saturday Michael Floyd stepped on the field at Notre Dame, he looked the part of an NFL wide receiver. Whether it was the freshman records he set in touchdowns, receptions and yards, the pure ball skills that make him a red zone match-up nightmare, or the NFL-ready physicality, everybody that’s watched Floyd play these last three seasons knew there was a very real chance that Floyd only spent three seasons in a Notre Dame uniform.

So as the Irish go through their last-minute preparations for the Sun Bowl, the Notre Dame coaching staff and the Irish faithful are bracing for the very possible reality that Michael Floyd will be playing his last game in an Irish uniform this Saturday.

Let’s take a look at some of the key factors in the decision that lies ahead of Floyd.


Let’s deal with the elephant first. Any decision Floyd makes should be based on what he’ll likely get monetarily to forgo his final season at Notre Dame, and all of that is contingent on where he’ll go in the NFL Draft.

Both Floyd and tight end Kyle Rudolph have asked for evaluations from the NFL Advisory Board, trying to get a better grasp on where they’ll be selected if they enter this spring’s draft as underclassmen. There’s a general consensus among pundits that Floyd’s among the top-five wide receivers in this year’s draft, though he’s closer to the bottom of that grouping than the top, which could mean just about anything when it comes to hearing his name called.

Over the past six years, there have been 21 wide receivers taken in the first round. Three times, six wideouts have gone in the first, once none did. It isn’t hard to do the basic math and understand that Floyd’s far from assured that he’ll hear his name called in primetime this spring. With that type of variance in the first round, let’s take a closer look at the type of wide receivers that heard their names called in round one.

One of Mike’s assets is his physicality. He’s 6-foot-3, almost 230-pounds and on film looks every bit as physical as his size dictates. That said, Floyd isn’t likely to clock in with a blazing 40-yard dash time, making it’ll a little easier to group him with a segment of past round one wide receivers. Without elite speed, it’s pretty easy to look at the past few years and say that if Floyd is going in round one, it’ll be the bottom half of the round, a place where guys like Hakeem Nicks and Dwayne Bowe went, receivers similar to Floyd in both size and speed.

Of course, it isn’t hard to look back at the recent history of Notre Dame skill players in the draft and wonder what that means for Floyd’s future. Whether it was Golden Tate and Jimmy Clausen’s tumble down the board or someone like Brady Quinn, there’s a very real issue of Irish players being over-hyped on draft boards when they make their decisions. To Floyd’s credit, he’s taking the patient approach, and waiting to hear from the advisory board before he makes any decision.

“Right now it doesn’t come into my head,” Floyd said. “A lot of people ask, and my answer doesn’t change for anybody. I still say I don’t know what I’m going to do.”

As if the decision wasn’t hard enough, Floyd and the rest of the underclassmen will have to monitor the NFL’s stalemate for a new collective bargaining agreement, a negotiation that could have major implications on the rookie wage scale and whether or not there’s even NFL football in 2011. There’s a lot of bluster out there right now on what may or may not happen, but for a junior making a jump to the next level, there’s an unprecedented amount of uncertainty.


Floyd’s role in Irish lore likely doesn’t play a part in his decision to return to the Irish for his senior season, but if he does, you can all but pencil Floyd at the top of every career mark in the school’s receiving record books.

Right now, Floyd sits fifth in receiving yards and third in receptions in school history, marks that’ll be easily shattered if Floyd comes back for 2011. Floyd is only one touchdown catch behind record holder Jeff Samardzija with 26 on his career, one where he’s missed nine games because of various injuries. (Something NFL teams certainly notice.)

Those injuries and a turbulent three seasons in South Bend all will frame the legacy Floyd leaves behind at Notre Dame. Like his former teammates Tate and Clausen, it’s hard to argue against their statistical brilliance in their short careers. But Floyd would walk away from the Irish after just a so-so season individually, on top of a transition year for a team that clearly struggled to find an offensive identity.

The idea of a legacy for a 21-year-old college athlete is a dizzying proposition, and any status you’ll earn with an rabid fanbase won’t do anything to help pay the bills for both you and your family. (Unless you go the route of guys like Cam Newton, Reggie Bush, and Terrelle Pryor.) The Irish have been snakebit all the way back to Justin Tuck’s early departure, and Floyd’s return would be the first high-profile senior season since Brady Quinn’s.


Floyd returning to school likely means he thinks he can boost his draft stock after a resurgent senior season. And if that’s the decision he ultimately makes, it’s pretty easy to support it. Floyd’s averaging a career-low in yards-per catch, and his 10 touchdowns isn’t much of an improvement on his previous two seasons when you consider the games he sat out with injuries. Entering the 2010 season, Floyd was the primary focus of every defense that faced the Irish and his three 100-yard games are less than he put up his freshman season, where he had four.

In 2011, Floyd would return to an offense that loses only Chris Stewart from the Sun Bowl starting lineup, and welcomes back two quarterbacks with significant minutes triggering Brian Kelly’s spread attack. He’ll have Theo Riddick anchored in the slot, John Goodman and TJ Jones playing on the edge along with some talented freshman and Tyler Eifert (or potentially Kyle Rudolph) occupying defenses at tight end. Add to that equation a competent running game and it isn’t hard to see why Floyd could buoy his draft stock with a prolific senior season in an offense that’ll evolve in season two of Brian Kelly’s tenure.


Still, if Friday is the last time we see Michael Floyd in an Irish uniform, he’ll leave behind a standard of hard work and dedication for his teammates.

“Michael Floyd is somebody that impacted our entire football team,” Kelly said. “He set a standard from my perspective, of how you want champions to practice and prepare. What he leaves is a standard I can point to moving forward: That’s how you prepare, that’s how you practice. Look at Michael Floyd.”

While it’d be fun to have Michael Floyd in the blue and gold for another autumn, you can’t blame him either way.

Kelly confident Robinson will rebound

Notre Dame v Florida State

Corey Robinson‘s season was already off to a slow start. And that was before a difficult night at Clemson. The junior receiver came into last weekend with only four catches, held out against UMass after a pregame tweak of his knee put a scare into the Irish.

Robinson’s knee checked out fine. But mentally, it appears that the sure-handed junior is struggling.

Just before halftime against the Tigers, Robinson failed to reel in a long catch that would’ve given the Irish a much-needed touchdown heading into half. Early in the fourth quarter, a high throw from DeShone Kizer on the Irish’s first failed two-point conversion play slid through Robinson’s hands. Made worse was a mental mistake by Robinson, the Irish needing to use one of their second half timeouts when the junior wasn’t on the field.

Coached hard on the sideline by Brian Kelly and coached up by his position coach Mike Denbrock (as we saw on both Showtime and Fighting Irish Media’s ICON), the staff is doing it’s best to get Robinson’s confidence back.

With some wondering if Robinson’s struggles should open the door for talented freshman Equanimeous St. Brown, Kelly talked about their belief that the junior will return to form.

“Corey Robinson is going to get the job done. I had a very lengthy conversation with him yesterday,” Kelly said Tuesday. “I believe in Corey. Corey’s got to believe in himself, and he will. He’s got to go attack the football. He’s letting the football come to him. He’s letting it eat him up a little bit, but I believe in Corey.”

There’s no better place to showcase that belief than against Navy. The Midshipmen don’t have a defender physically capable of matching up with the 6-foot-5 Robinson, who will likely face his share of single coverage with Will Fuller likely demanding safety help.

Then it’s just a matter of Robinson showing the hands and confidence that made him one of last year’s most consistent performers.

“Once he starts attacking the football, I think we’re going to see somebody that can make the plays that we expect him to make,” Kelly said. “So I’m optimistic that we’re going to see the guy that we need to see on Saturday.”

And in that corner… The Navy Midshipmen

Keenan Reynolds, Jamar Summers

The theme of this week’s game might very well be mutual respect. But if Notre Dame is going to get their season back on track, they’ll need to very quickly get past any sort of reverence they have for Ken Niumatalolo and the Navy Midshipmen and look for any way to beat them.

Sandwiched between showdowns against Clemson and USC, Navy comes to town, one of the below-the-radar unbeaten teams in the country. With option superstar Keenan Reynolds in the final year of a career that is already one of the most prolific in college football history, the Irish defense goes into triple-option mode for the second time in this young season, asked to once again find an answer for an attack that not many people have solved.

Helping us to prepare for the Midshipmen is the play-by-play voice of Navy athletics, Pete Medhurst. Covering Navy football since 1997, Pete was kind enough to get us ready for the 89th meeting between Notre Dame and the Naval Academy.

Hope you enjoy.


Lost in the misery Notre Dame fans feel after the Irish’s undefeated hopes washed away in Clemson last weekend, is that the Navy team coming to South Bend is really, really good. I know it’s early, but you’ve been covering the Midshipmen for a long time. Can you rank where this team stacks up compared to some of the others you’ve seen?

I think its the best overall Navy team, considering the play of both units right now and special teams as well. The defense is giving up  just 15 points a game, and based on the prowess of the offense, that’s going to lead to a lot of victories if you play at that level.


Is Keenan Reynolds the best triple-option QB in Navy history? As someone who has watched his career evolve, can you speak to his improvements as a quarterback and a player? How important has he been to the evolution of this program?

I believe production speaks for itself. Good health could make him the leading touchdown scorer of all-time in the sport. He’s a coach on the field. Speaks like a coach, has a want to get better. Each day is a mission for him and the unit to get better and they hold themselves to a high standard to meet each day, he’s the leader of that group.



Joining the American Conference was a huge decision, but one that looks to be paying dividends. Have you noticed a difference in the program now that they’re chasing a conference title?

Coaches say it is. They have been met with quality response on the road recruiting. We get to states that are important footprints for us and just adds another goal where our players can be rewarded for their hard work. The conference has been very, very, good so far this year.


Defensively, this game should stress Navy. Notre Dame’s big-play potential is the best of the Brian Kelly era. (The Irish already have more 50-plus yard touchdowns than they’ve had in any other season under Kelly.)

Takeaways and preventing big plays seem to be a tenet of a Buddy Green defense. Are those the big keys for the Midshipmen defensively?

No question this is by far the fastest team Notre Dame has ever had. I go all the way back to the great Lindsay Nelson days when I used to watch the Notre Dame football report every Sunday morning. They can attack you anywhere at anytime with several people. Double cover one, they have three others in the formation who can beat you any play. Brian has put together a great plan and his coaches have delivered great recruits to the program. Many teams can’t survive an injury to the QB, but they have.

Mids have turned teams over this year and that’s a huge key for any defense. With Dale Pehrson taking over the defense (note: Green is taking a sabbatical to recover from major neck surgery this season) those goals have not changed. Eleven guys getting to the football, ball comes out, you have a great chance to get it!


Notre Dame had success earlier this season against Georgia Tech, and Brian Kelly spent a gigantic portion of his offseason preparing for the triple-option, going as far as recruiting a walk-on option quarterback who runs an option-specific scout team.

Do you think the success the Irish defense had against Paul Johnson’s triple-option will help this weekend? Or do you see subtle, but important differences between what Ken Niumatalolo does than his predecessor?

Coach Kelly is a good football coach. After we beat them at the Meadowlands, 35-17, you sensed, he was going to work hard to find a solution because for them to achieve their goals, they have to beat us.

Im not sure how many huge differences their are in our two offenses, one though is the QB. His ability to get Navy into the right play is huge no matter how a team lines up. Defensive personnel has improved in a huge way for Notre Dame too. They have quality people who can run and get to the ball. Last couple have been barn burners. Hopefully Saturday can be the same.