Urban Meyer

Friday notes: Kiel, juniors, camps and more

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Before we kick-off the notes portion of the show, I wanted to give a quick apology if it’s been a little up-and-down here the past week or two. I’m trying to get my off-season legs under me, and a lot of the work I’m doing for the website isn’t quite ready for broadcast.

If you’re one of those readers that is trying to decide whether or not they should just hibernate and comeback in August, you’ll be making a big mistake, as we’ve got some infinitely cool stuff ready to lead us through spring practice and into preseason.

(Pep talk over. Commence notes column.)

For those of you staying up to speed on your recruiting, the Irish are in the running for two of this year’s biggest quarterback prospects, Maty Mauk and Gunner Kiel. Both have ties to the Irish program — Kiel’s uncle Blair played quarterback for the Irish and Mauk’s brother Ben played quarterback for Brian Kelly at Cincinnati.

Both already have dozens of scholarship offers and project well in Kelly’s offensive system. While Kiel was slated to stop in South Bend for an unofficial campus visit before this weekend’s junior day, Christian McCollum from IrishSportsDaily.com reports that inclement weather has pushed the family to reschedule the visit.

Obviously, getting a recruit on campus sooner than later is a priority for the Irish coaching staff, but any rumors that Kiel or his family may have already shut the door on the Irish seem to be ill-founded, and in some ways the Irish could have a situation where both Mauk and Kiel will push each other in the Irish’s favor, as Notre Dame will likely only take one quarterback, and the QB carousel will only stop once in South Bend.

I’ve got a feeling we’ll be hearing a lot about these two quarterbacks over the next few months so buckle up and I’ll keep you posted.


Bad weather or not, the Irish coaching staff is still holding a junior day this weekend, with over two dozen recruits planning on attending. As of this morning, here are the recruits with offers that plan on being on campus:

Nicky Baratti, QB/S — Spring, Texas
Maty Mauk, QB — Kenton, Ohio
Mike Moore, DE — Hyattsville, Maryland
Tom Strobel, DE — Mentor, Ohio
Dan Voltz, OL — Barrington, Illinois

Baratti lists as a quarterback or athlete, but it’s pretty clear that he’s being targeted as a safety, a position where the Irish are in need of numbers and playmakers. We’ve covered Mauk, who would finalize the Irish’s quarterbacking plans if he committed (though I’m sure BK and crew could find room for Kiel if he wanted to join as well.) Moore is a monstrous athlete with elite offers, and it looks like it could be Diaco vs. Larry Johnson Sr. part two for the prototype 3-4 defensive end. Strobel fits that mold of a Kelly “Big Skill” athlete, measuring in at 6-6, 240-pounds, and the ability to play with a hand on the ground as well as in space. Voltz has also seen his stock rise considerably, adding offers from SEC powers Alabama and Auburn over the last few weeks.

You can’t expect the Irish to walk out of the weekend with a commitment, but expect some great in-roads to be made, especially important with recruits like Moore and Baratti.


Hard core chalk-talk might not be up everybody’s alley, but if you’re a football coach or merely interested in an absolutely riveting collection of offensive minds, you should seriously consider attending the  Notre Dame Football Coaches Clinic.

It’s hard to top two of Kelly’s featured guests, former Irish wide receivers coach Urban Meyer (yeah, I guess he made a little noise in Gainesville) and Oregon Ducks head coach Chip Kelly. The fact that Meyer and Kelly accepted BK’s invitation to come back and speak certainly shines highly on Kelly’s reputation among his peers and more importantly, puts three of the biggest spread offensive innovators in the same room, something that high school coaches or football nuts have to find incredibly intriguing.

Charley Molnar, Bob Diaco, and the rest of the Irish coaching staff will all be presenting, and they’ll also be joined by high school coaches Mickey Wilson of Myrtle Beach High School in South Carolina and Rick Finotti, the head coach of St. Ed’s High School, a powerhouse program in Ohio.

The event takes place from Thursday March 24 – 26 and includes access to two Notre Dame spring practices.


While I’m stumping for Notre Dame camps, I’d be remiss if I didn’t bring up the annual Notre Dame Football Fantasy Camp, which is taking place again this summer from May 31 – June 4th.

If donning the full uniform of the Fighting Irish, being coached by the entire coaching staff, and playing a fully refereed football game in Notre Dame Stadium is your thing, than you’ll likely want to see if you can scratch together what it takes to make this dream a reality.

Last year, I was lucky enough to attend, and got a first hand look at what being coached by guys like Bob Diaco, Mike Elston and Chuck Martin was like. Even better, throughout the week, it was like a revolving door of former Irish greats working with both teams, with guys like Tony Rice, Chris Zorich, Allen Pinkett, Terry Hanratty, and dozens more dropping by to share their experience.

Football operations director Chad Klunder, who runs the camp, has already confirmed former Heisman Trophy winner Paul Hornung for this summer. If you’ve got some cash saved up and want to go through some middle-aged wish fulfillment, it’s definitely worth some serious thought.


A few quick links:

* If you’re wondering what helped bring Greg Mattison back to Michigan, a great relationship with Brady Hoke probably helped, but so did a guaranteed $750,000, which has a chance to bump to $900,000 if the Wolverines win the Big Ten.

* Jonas “Meatball” Gray 1, Dustin “Screech” Diamond 0. (Still looking for the video, though.)

* Harrison Smith’s interceptions, broken down by ND messageboard coach Busco21.



Evaluating VanGorder’s scheme against the option

ANNAPOLIS, MD - SEPTEMBER 19:  Keenan Reynolds #19 of the Navy Midshipmen rushes for his fifth touchdown in the fourth quarter against the East Carolina Pirates during their 45-21 win on September 19, 2015 in Annapolis, Maryland.  (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

Notre Dame’s ability to slow down Georgia Tech’s vaunted option attack served as one of the high points to the Irish’s early season success. After spending a considerable amount of offseason energy towards attacking the option and learning more, watching the Irish hold the Yellow Jackets in check was a huge victory for Brian VanGorder, Bob Elliott and the rest of Notre Dame’s staff.

But it was only half the battle.

This weekend, Keenan Reynolds and Navy’s veteran offense come to town looking to wreak some havoc on a defense that’s struggled to slow it down. And after getting a look at some of the new tricks the Irish had in store for Paul Johnson, Ken Niumatalolo and his offensive coaches have likely started plotting their counterpunches days in advance.

How did Notre Dame’s defense slow down Georgia Tech? Brian Kelly credited an aggressive game plan and continually changing looks. So while some were quick to wonder whether Notre Dame’s scheme changes were the biggest piece of the puzzle, it’s interesting to see how the Irish’s strategic decisions looked from the perspective of an option expert.

Over at “The Birddog” blog, Michael James utilizes his spread option expertise and takes a look at how the Irish defended Georgia Tech. His conclusion:

Did the Irish finally figure out the magic formula that will kill this gimmick high school offense for good?

Not exactly.

The Irish played a fairly standard 4-3 for a large chunk of the game. James thought Notre Dame’s move to a 3-5-3 was unique, though certainly not the first time anybody’s used that alignment.

But what stood out wasn’t necessarily the Xs and Os, but rather how much better Notre Dame’s personnel reacted to what they were facing.

Again, from the Birddog Blog:

The real story here, and what stood out to me when watching Notre Dame play Georgia Tech, was how much faster the Irish played compared to past years. I don’t mean that they are more athletic, although this is considered to be the best Notre Dame team in years. I mean that they reacted far more quickly to what they saw compared to what they’ve done in the past.

Usually, when a team plays a spread option offense, one of the biggest challenges that defensive coordinators talk about is replicating the offense’s speed and precision. It’s common to hear them say that it takes a series or two to adjust. That was most certainly not the case here.

James referenced our Media Day observations and seemed impressed by the decision to bring in walk-on Rob Regan to captain what’s now known as the SWAG team. And while VanGorder’s reputation as a mad scientist had many Irish fans wondering if the veteran coordinator cooked something up that hadn’t been seen, it was more a trait usually associated with Kelly that seems to have made the biggest difference.

“It wasn’t that the game plan was so amazing (although it was admittedly more complex and aggressive than we’ve seen out of other Notre Dame teams),” James wrote. “It was plain ol’ coachin’ ’em up.

“Notre Dame’s players were individually more prepared for what they’d see. Notre Dame is already extremely talented, but talented and prepared? You can’t adjust for that. That’s more challenging for Navy than any game plan.”

Irish prepared to take on the best Navy team in years


Brian Kelly opens every Tuesday press conference with compliments for an opponent. But this week, it was easy to see that his kind words for Navy were hardly lip service.

Ken Niumatalolo will bring his most veteran—and probably his most talented—group of Midshipmen into Notre Dame Stadium, looking to hand the Irish their first loss in the series since Kelly’s debut season in South Bend.

“Ken Niumatalolo has done an incredible job in developing his program and currently carrying an eight-game winning streak,” Kelly said. “I voted for them in USA Today Top 25 as a top-25 team. I think they’ve earned that. But their defense as well has developed. It’s played the kind of defense that I think a top 25 team plays.”

With nine months of option preparation, Notre Dame needs to feel confident about their efforts against Georgia Tech. Then again, the Midshipmen saw that game plan and likely have a few tricks in store.

As much as the Irish have focused their efforts on stopping Keenan Reynolds and the triple-option, Navy’s much-improved defense is still looking for a way to slow down a team that’s averaged a shade over 48 points a game against them the last four seasons.

Niumatalolo talked about that when asked about slowing down Will Fuller and Notre Dame’s skill players, an offense that’s averaged over 48 points a game during this four-game win streak.

“We’ve got to try our best to keep [Fuller] in front of us, that’s easier said than done,” Niumatalolo said. “We’ve got to play as close as we can without their guys running past us. I’ve been here a long time and we’re still trying to figure out how to do that.”


Navy heads to South Bend unbeaten, defeating former Irish defensive coordinator Bob Diaco‘s team just two Saturdays ago. And while Diaco raised a few eyebrows when he said Navy would be the team’s toughest test of the year (they already played a ranked Missouri team), the head of the UConn program couldn’t have been more effusive in his praise.

“I have been competing against Navy for some time and this is the best Navy team I have seen for, let’s say the last half-dozen years,” UConn coach Bob Diaco told the New Haven Register. “I could click on footage from three years ago and see a lion’s share of players who are playing right now in the game as freshmen and sophomores. They have a veteran group, a strong group, a talented group and they look like the stiffest competition among our first four opponents.”

As usual, there will be those who look at this game as the breather between Clemson and USC. That won’t be anybody inside The Gug. So as the Irish try to get back to their winning ways in front of a home crowd, a complete team effort is needed.

“I’ll take a win by one,” Kelly said Tuesday. “That would be fine with me.”