Kyle McAlarney, Preston Knowles

South Bend Tribune looks at ResLife and admissions

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Any discussion between Irish fans about Notre Dame’s office of Residence Life or the school’s admissions policy usually ends up resembling a fireside fishing story — buried amidst the embellishment is some kernel of truth.

For every tale of draconian punishment decried there’s usually a high-profile disciplinary case where even the strictest of Irish fans have shaken their head over the school’s logic. Likewise, for every story about five-star recruit X getting slid through admissions when in the past he’d have never gotten a chance, there are more than likely examples of Notre Dame admitting students with lesser academic profiles than the norm.

While some high-profile stories this preseason have wondered aloud whether the handling of Michael Floyd‘s disciplinary case or the admission of some elite recruits signifies a lowering of standards in both discipline and academics, the truth is likely somewhere in the middle.

With unprecedented access, the South Bend Tribune‘s Eric Hansen looks at the two hot-button issues, penning comprehensive stories on the two issues that have drawn the microscopes of football fans everywhere. The Sunday morning print exclusives are now available on the internet and there is quite a bit to digest for those interested in a story that’s only tangentially about football.

In Hansen’s first piece on the evolution of ResLife, the university’s disciplinary arm for students, he cites the change in the discipline of other athletes — namely former Irish tight end Will Yeatman, former point guard Kyle McAlarney, and former fullback Rashon Powers-Neal — from that punishment levied recently on Floyd.

There was a PR whiplash of sorts for Notre Dame, though, for being responsive to the voices that pushed for change and taking what it considered a more fair, more progressive approach with not only Floyd but the dozens of other cases last fall and spring that involved lower-profile students.

Cynics connected the dots to the Yeatman/McAlarney/Powers-Neal cases and concluded there was some kind of legal gerrymandering going on because of Floyd’s importance to the team. And that, they argued – coupled with facility upgrades and alleged relaxing of admissions standards – meant Notre Dame was somehow compromising what it had long purported to stand for.

Pierce, and many alumni like him – including Yeatman – look at it instead as evolution. A very necessary evolution.

Those who adjudicated the verdicts in Res Life for Yeatman, McAlarney and Powers-Neal didn’t have the power to do anything short of suspending them. Du Lac didn’t allow for any other outcome in cases involving student probation.

And that was perhaps the most significant change in the 2010-11 handbook from its earlier iterations, that initial probation no longer came with an automatic suspension from extracurricular activities – student government, student media, retreat leaders and, yes, football.

“Probation is actually probation now,” said Brian Coughlin, associate vice president for student affairs/student development. “That means if you do something else, there will be further consequences.”

There were other significant changes, notably in how DUI and other alcohol-related offenses were defined and how incidents off-campus were treated as opposed to those that occurred on-campus. All of which could have changed the trajectory of Yeatman’s experience at ND and all of which were in print and online for the world to peruse seven months before Floyd’s future went temporarily gray on March 20.

That Notre Dame’s official handbook was not only enacted, but in print and available to the public more than seven months before Floyd ran afoul from the law seems to be the biggest revelation coming from the story.

The fact that many who have called the decision to let Floyd remain in school, therefore allowing him the chance to stay with the football team, special treatment are forgetting that this new policy first came into the headlines last May, when tight end Mike Ragone was arrested on a misdemeanor marijuana charge, an arrest that didn’t cost him any playing time with the Irish either.

Hansen’s other story takes a deeper look at the admissions policy of the university as it relates to student-athletes, starting with a look at former Irish linebacker John Foley‘s unlikely journey to Notre Dame.

“I was a kid from inner city Chicago, who came from a family with five kids who lived in a three-bedroom apartment,” said Foley, now a big name in the financial world with Barrington Research, “During my recruitment, I was offered $100,000 from one school. My parents were offered a new house, new jobs from another. My girlfriend and I were offered gifts to go to another.

“Then I talked to (then-Notre Dame coach) Lou Holtz when I was on an official recruiting visit to ND and he said, ‘Hey if you want to come here and get an education, we’d love to have you. If you don’t, we don’t want you. Go home.’ ”

Holtz then told Foley, the nation’s premier linebacker prospect, that he needed to have a backup plan for his life in case he got hurt. And Foley did, early and often. His ND football career consisted of 27 minutes and eight seconds of cameos, all during his sophomore season (1987).

First, though, Foley had to get past then-director of undergraduate admissions Kevin Rooney, who made it a point to meet face-to-face with the football prospects.

“Lou Holtz told me, ‘Kid, this is going to be the interview of your life,’ ” Foley said. “ ‘If he says no, there’s nothing I can do to change that.’ Rooney was tough. He asked me why my test scores were so low. As it turns out, I was dyslexic, but didn’t know it at that time.

“He looked me in the eye, though, and saw how hard I was willing to work. I told him I wanted to be a student first. And every day, literally, I thank God Mr. Rooney let me in.”

Foley, quarterback Tony Rice and basketball player Keith Robinson were all admitted during the first year of the NCAA’s controversial Proposition 48 implementation. Each was forced by the NCAA to sit out all athletic activities their freshman year.

Two very interested reads, and two articles you should read in their entirety (ResLife and admissions). Great scoops by Hansen, who was given very good access by the university.

Irish A-to-Z: Ian Book

Ian Book
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Notre Dame’s incoming freshman steps into one of the most harrowing depth charts in college football. But he also comes to South Bend prepared, a freshman season where anything is possible.

Book may be No. 4 in a four-deep that includes three of the most intriguing quarterbacks in college football. But he’s also a play away from being the team’s backup. That’s the plan heading into freshman year, with Brandon Wimbush hoping to keep a redshirt on this season after being forced into action in 2015.

A highly productive high school quarterback, Book didn’t wow any of the recruiting evaluators. But Mike Sanford took dead aim at Book and landed a quarterback he thinks can step in and be ready if needed.

 

IAN BOOK
6’0″, 190 lbs.
Freshman, No. 4, QB

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

Three-star prospect who had offers from Boise State and Washington State before Notre Dame jumped in and landed him. His previous relationship with Mike Sanford from his time in Boise made the difference.

Undersized but cerebral player who was highly prolific in high school. Named conference MVP in senior season at Oak Ridge high school and was the No. 14 overall pro-style QB according to Rivals.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

If Book is going to be a big-time college quarterback, it’ll be because he’s got a knack for the game that you don’t see from his physical skill-set. He’s undersized and a little bit slight. He’s got good wheels, but doesn’t play like a speed demon.

You don’t need an elite set of tools to be successful in Brian Kelly’s system. And while a comparison to Tommy Rees will come off as a slight, it’s a compliment—especially after hearing the staff speak confidently about Book’s ability to come in and know the system well enough to be ready to play as a freshman, if necessary.

(Book is also faster than Rees, so relax everybody.)

 

CRYSTAL BALL

Unless the sky is falling, Book is wearing a redshirt. And that’s the best thing for him—even if he’ll prepare as the emergency No. 3, a duty Wimbush was pushed into last year.

A look at Notre Dame’s depth chart and the war chest of talent accumulated at the position makes these next five years look like an uphill climb to get onto the field. But until Book steps foot on campus, all bets are off.

Remember, Tommy Rees entered Notre Dame with two other quarterbacks at his position, both rated better than him by recruiting analysts. But it was Rees that pushed past the five-star recruit already on campus for two seasons and his two classmates.

Of course, DeShone Kizer, Malik Zaire and Brandon Wimbush aren’t Dayne Crist, Andrew Hendrix and Luke Massa. But until we see Book at the college level, it’s a wait and see proposition.

But the freshman has a key role on the 2016 team. Even if everybody hopes he won’t have to do it.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner

Irish A-to-Z: Jonathan Bonner

Jon Bonner Rivals
Rivals via Twitter
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After two seasons of limited duty, there’s a road to the field for Jonathan Bonner. The rising junior, who spent last year mostly watching and learning as Brian VanGorder and Keith Gilmore played a skeleton rotation, has a chance to break into a position group that’s searching for answers that Bonner seems well-suited to provide.

But Bonner also plays behind the team’s best defensive lineman, with senior Isaac Rochell poised to anchor the front seven. So as the rising junior moves into his third season in South Bend, he’ll need to show a versatile set of skills to get onto the field.

 

JONATHAN BONNER
6’3″, 286 lbs.
Junior, No. 55, DL

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

Bonner may not have been a highly-touted recruit, but he was just starting to rack up impressive offers when he pledged to Notre Dame. Bonner earned a scholarship offer at every summer camp he attended, and his commitment to the Irish came after he dominated some of the best offensive line prospects in the country at Notre Dame’s summer camp.

An All-State performer and the defensive player of the year in St. Louis. Also a more than impressive student-athlete, with a note he wrote to himself as a grade schooler a pretty incredible piece of maturity.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2014): Did not see action.

Sophomore Season (2015): Played in 10 games, making 10 tackles and notching one sack. Played a season-high 39 snaps along the defensive line in the Fiesta Bowl against Ohio State. Saw double-digit snaps against Texas, UMass, Wake Forest and Boston College.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

This seems pretty solid.

I’m buying Bonner’s future, though I’m a little less sure that he’ll break loose in 2015. With Isaac Rochell capable of being a frontline player, Bonner getting on the field might mean Rochell’s off of it, which I just don’t see happening too often.

But if there’s a beauty to Brian VanGorder’s defense—at least when it’s playing like it did the first half of the season—it’s the ability to mix and match. And if there’s no way to find Bonner a role in this defense, especially as the Irish try to find someone to come off the edge, then it’s more on the young prospect’s knowledge base than anything a coaching staff can do.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

This might not be a make or break season for Bonner, especially since he’s got a fifth year available. But I think it could be. With the opportunity to provide a disruption from the interior of the defensive line, Bonner needs to find a home in a position group that could use a versatile defender who can both hold up at the point of attack and get to the quarterback.

Bonner started at outside linebacker, but quickly moved to the front four. Last year’s progress was slowed by a turf toe injury in April, short-circuiting a sold spring. There wasn’t a lot of opportunity to contribute in 2015, but there was certainly a need for someone to provide a pass rush and Bonner wasn’t given that chance—something that speaks to where he was as a developmental prospect last year.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I think Bonner will find a niche on the inside or third downs, considering neither Jerry Tillery nor Jarron Jones look like pass rush threats. That could kick open a spot for Bonner on the inside, or it could allow him to play at the strong side if Rochell slides inside.

Of course, that’s mostly determined by Bonner, who has flashed talent and athleticism, but hasn’t translated that to the field yet. Some think Bonner is one of the most intriguing athletes on the roster, and he’s certainly one of the team’s better workout warriors. But that needs to transition to the football field with some productivity, a key development piece for Keith Gilmore and a uncertain front four.

Bonner spoke with confidence this spring that his knowledge base was now matching his skill-set. If he’s able to put everything together, he could be a very nice complementary piece to the front four.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship

Jarrett Grace signs FA contract with Chicago Bears

SOUTH BEND, IN - SEPTEMBER 5: Jarrett Grace #59 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish in action during a game against the Texas Longhorns at Notre Dame Stadium on September 5, 2015 in South Bend, Indiana. Notre Dame defeated Texas 38-3. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
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Former Notre Dame linebacker Jarrett Grace has signed with the Chicago Bears. The former Rockne Award winner will continue his improbable return from a devastating leg injury during OTAs and training camp, fighting for a roster spot on the NFC North squad.

Grace worked out for the Bears at a tryout camp and Chicago made the roster move official Wednesday, signing Grace and releasing linebacker Danny Mason.

After redshirting as a freshman and sitting behind Manti Te’o, Grace moved into the starting lineup as a junior and led the Irish in tackles before suffering a severe leg injury against Arizona State. It took nearly two years for Grace to return to duty, needing to re-learn how to run as he underwent multiple procedures to repair the rod that held Grace’s bone in place.

He played in 32 games for the Irish, finishing with 78 total tackles.

Irish A-to-Z: Grant Blankenship

Notre Dame v Syracuse
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Notre Dame’s junior defensive end has an unclear status entering his third season in the program. Suspended by Brian Kelly this spring after playing minimal snaps as a sophomore, the Texas native already had an unclear path to the field even before you consider his status as a member of the team and student at the university.

After playing in 11 games as a true freshman, Blankenship struggled to make progress after adding the mass needed to play on the strong side. With the depth chart at defensive end already in question, Blankenship is a true unknown entering 2016.

 

GRANT BLANKENSHIP
6’5″, 278
Junior, No. 92, DE

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A late-riser on the recruiting scene, Blankenship turned down an offer from Charlie Strong to stick with his commitment to Notre Dame, his favorite program as a child. An early target by former defensive coordinator Bob Diaco, and he stuck with Notre Dame even after Diaco departed for UConn.

Not highly rated, Blankenship fell outside the 250 recruits on 247’s composite.

 

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2014): Played in 11 games, making 12 tackles including one TFL. Didn’t play against Navy or LSU. Made three tackles against Syracuse.

Sophomore Season (2015): Appeared in three games, making one assisted tackle. Played a season-high 10 snaps against UMass.

 

WHAT WE PROJECTED LAST YEAR

Blankenship’s participation took a step backwards. He looked like a potential redshirt until he played in garbage time. Partial credit, at best. Nobody gave Rochell and Day a break.

It’s too hard to project Blankenship as a 30-snap-a-game contributor. But if he’s forced into action, the experience he got last season will come in handy. More likely, Blankenship will be part of an expanded front seven depth chart, and will make it easier to keep guys like Isaac Rochell and Sheldon Day fresh.

As a second-year player, he and Andrew Trumbetti have a chance to both make big steps forward this season. If either can help a pass rush that needs to win more from base packages, it’ll be huge for the defense. Expect new defensive line coach Keith Gilmore to get this through to Blankenship, who likely derives fuel from being overlooked, something he certainly was last season.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

We’ll know a lot more about Blankenship’s future when the Irish enroll in summer school. If he’s there, it’ll signal that there’s a road back onto the team. If not, it’ll be another washout at defensive end, a position that’s been very difficult to keep together.

At this point, barring some remarkable change to his production or the depth chart, there doesn’t look like much of a road to playing time for Blankenship, at least not with Isaac Rochell on the roster in front of him.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

Very unclear.

I wouldn’t be surprised if Blankenship was a part of a different program come next fall or buried on the depth chart at Notre Dame. The one reason for optimism is the position he plays. There’s opportunity at defensive end, especially if you can rush the passer.

Blankenship hasn’t show that ability yet. Part of that came from gaining a ton of weight between his freshman and sophomore seasons. The other part of it was scheme—he was recruited by Bob Diaco to play a different type of end.

Let’s get Blankenship out of the doghouse and back onto the field before we look for optimism.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin

 

This week’s episode of Blown Coverage features me pitching John Walters on the perfect three-year solution for Notre Dame’s QB conundrum. And a bunch of other stuff. Enjoy.