And in that corner… The South Florida Bulls


After eight long months, it’s finally time to talk about football again, as the season kicks off with Skip Holtz and his South Florida Bulls. While I’ve done my best to keep everybody up-to-speed on USF and the dangers they present, what better time to kick off this season’s “And in that corner,” than now.

Joining us is Ken DeCelles from the USF blog Voodoo Five. (Or as the guys there call it, one of the few college blogs on the internet not run by law students.) If you’ve got a few dozen spare hours on your hands, they’ve gone one-by-one through the Bulls roster, giving you the skinny on every player. (Here’s their entry on RB Darrell Scott. We had enough debate over ranking the top 20. I can’t imagine what the whole 85-man roster would’ve looked like.)

With that level of dedication in mind, Ken was nice enough to take some time and answer some questions I had about Skip Holtz’s squad.

Inside the Irish: It seems like the Bulls offense will go as B.J. Daniels goes. What kind of day do you think he’ll have on Saturday? What do the Irish need to do to make him struggle?
It just depends on how Daniels does on the ground. It took a while last year for Holtz and OC Todd Fitch to mold the offense around Daniels’ skill-set, but towards the end of the year we saw some pretty exotic option attacks that helped spring our passing game. If our running game forces a safety into the box, it could open up our passing game.

The Irish need to keep Daniels in the pocket if they want Daniels to struggle. Daniels has always been uncomfortable when he’s forced to stay in the pocket. If the Irish defensive line can keep contain on the edge or Diaco keeps an ILB in as a spy to keep Daniels from breaking a couple runs loose it could force B.J. into a bad decision or two.

ITI: Notre Dame is coming off an 8-5 season and people in the mainstream media seem to think the Irish have a chance at a BCS game. What’s the ceiling for USF? How good is this team now and how good will it be by the end of the season?

Honestly I wouldn’t be surprised if the team goes 10-2 and runs away with the Big East. This is a pretty young team with only 14 scholarship seniors on the roster, and the two-deep is littered with freshmen and sophomores. Opening at a hostile environment like Notre Dame will prepare our underclassmen and will get them ready for the rest of the season. There’s only so much you can do during practice, and nothing can replicate actually playing in a game.

ITI: Name two offensive threats (not Daniels) that Irish fans might not know about, but will after Saturday’s game?

Most fans know about Colorado transfer Darrell Scott, so I’ll go with WRs A.J. Love and Sterling Griffin. Both players were primed to start for USF last season, but they missed all of last year due to a Torn ACL and a dislocated ankle. After getting their feet wet in the spring, both have done an excellent job this fall keeping their starting positions over younger players like Deonte Welch, Andre Davis, and Stephen Bravo-Brown.

A.J. is your classic possession receiver who isn’t afraid to go across the middle. By far the most experienced receiver, the 6th-Year Senior runs some really crisp routes and catches everything that comes his way. The staff has been so impressed with Love’s progress that they were able to move Evan Landi to H-Back, where he is more effective.

Griffin is the team’s deep threat, and he’s most known for his 73-yard touchdown against Florida State in 2009. Griffin and Daniels seemed to have a good rapport going with Daniels towards the end of 2009 and big things were expected from Sterling last year before his freak ankle injury.

ITI: The Bulls defense has a ton of speed and is building depth. How will they match-up with the Irish offense?

I think the defensive backs will hold their own against the wide receivers of Notre Dame. Quenton Washington, Kayvon Webster, Jerrell Young, and Jon LeJiste are probably the best DB group in the Big East and JaQuez Jenkins, Ernie Tabuteau, and Mark Joyce provide ample depth without much of a drop in production.

The linebackers might be the deepest group on the roster. MLB Sam Barrington and WLB DeDe Lattimore combined for over 150 tackles last season, and they’ll be joined by redshirt freshman Reshard Cliett at SLB, who will be making his first start Saturday. The backups are just as talented with Mike Lanaris, Curtis Weatherspoon, and Mike Jeune filling out the rotation.

We’ve been looking for a pass rushing DE ever since George Selvie and Jason Pierre-Paul left for the NFL two years ago, and we think Ryne Giddins has the tools to step in and make the leap. He was all-everything at nearby Armwood High School and spurned Florida to play for the hometown Bulls. Patrick Hampton and Julius Forte make a strong trio with Claude Davis coming in for pass-rushing scenarios.

DT is a big concern after you get past Keith McCaskill and Cory Grissom. Luke Sager and Elkino Watson are the clear backups, but neither have seen the field much and Watson is a true freshman. Behind them are Demi Thompson and Todd Chandler, who are good for a few plays at a time. If the backups can keep things together when rotated in, the Bulls should be able to stop Cierre Wood and the Irish rushing attack.

ITI: Finish this sentence: USF will upset Notre Dame if …

Daniels is able to run wild.

ITI: Look in your crystal ball. What do you see happening on Saturday?

I think this will be a defensive struggle. USF has made a living going into hostile territory and pulling off rather substantial upsets. Its probably the eternal optimist in me, but I think USF wins with a Maikon Bonani field goal as time expires. Bulls win 17-14.

For more from Ken and all the guys at “the toughest blog in America,” check out You can also follow Ken’s musings on Twitter. @SBNVoodooFive

Only focus after Clemson loss is winning on Saturday

SOUTH BEND, IN - SEPTEMBER 19: Head coach Brian Kelly of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish looks on against the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets in the second quarter at Notre Dame Stadium on September 19, 2015 in South Bend, Indiana. Notre Dame defeated Georgia Tech 30-22. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

The 2015 college football season has yet to showcase a truly great football team. With early title contenders like Ohio State and Michigan State looking less than stellar, Alabama losing a game already and the Pac-12 beating itself up, the chance that a one-loss Notre Dame team could still make it into the College Football Playoff is certainly a possibility.

But don’t expect Brian Kelly and his football team to start worrying about that now.

We saw a similar situation unfold last season, after the Irish lost a heartbreaker in the final seconds against Florida State. With many fans worried that Notre Dame wasn’t given credit for their performance in Tallahassee, the Irish’s playoff resume mattered very little as the team fell apart down the stretch.

As Notre Dame looks forward, their focus only extends to Saturday. That’s when Navy will test the Irish with their triple-option attack and better-than-usual defense, a team that Brian Kelly voted into his Top 25 this week.

Can this team make it to the Playoff? Kelly isn’t sure. But he knows what his team has to do.

“I don’t know,” Kelly said when asked about a one-loss entrance. “But we do know what we can control, and that is winning each week. So what we really talked about is we have no margin for error, and we have to pay attention to every detail.

“Each game is the biggest and most important game we play and really focusing on that. It isn’t concern yourself with big picture. You really have to focus on one week at a time.”

Kelly spread that message to his five captains after the game on Saturday night. He’s optimistic that message has set in over the weekend, and he’ll see how the team practices as they begin their on-field preparations for Navy this afternoon.

But when asked what type of response he wants to see from his team this week, it wasn’t about the minutiae of the week or a company line about daily improvement.

“The response is to win. That’s the response that we’re looking for,” Kelly said, before detailing four major factors to victory. “To win football games, you have to start fast, which we did not. There has to be an attention to detail, which certainly we were missing that at times. We got great effort, and we finished strong. So we were missing two of the four real key components that I’ll be looking for for this weekend. As long as we have those four key components, I’ll take a win by one. That would be fine with me. We need those four key components. That’s what I’ll be looking for.”

Go for two or not? Both sides of the highly-debated topic

during their game at Clemson Memorial Stadium on October 3, 2015 in Clemson, South Carolina.

Notre Dame’s two failed two-point conversion tries against Clemson have been the source of much debate in the aftermath of the Irish’s 24-22 loss to the Tigers. Brian Kelly’s decision to go for two with just over 14 minutes left in the game forced the Irish into another two-point conversion attempt with just seconds left in regulation, with DeShone Kizer falling short as he attempted to push the game into overtime.

Was Kelly’s decision to go for two the right one at the beginning of the fourth quarter? That depends.

Take away the result—a pass that flew through the fingers of a wide open Corey Robinson. Had the Irish kicked their extra point, Justin Yoon would’ve trotted onto the field with a chance to send the game into overtime. (Then again, had Robinson caught the pass, Notre Dame would’ve been kicking for the win in the final seconds…)

This is the second time a two-point conversion decision has opened Kelly up to second guessing in the past eight games. Last last season, Kelly’s decision to go for two in the fourth-quarter with an 11-point lead against Northwestern, came back to bite the Irish and helped the Wildcats stun Notre Dame in overtime.

That choice was likely fueled by struggles in the kicking game, heightened by Kyle Brindza’s blocked extra-point attempt in the first half, a kick returned by Northwestern that turned a 14-7 game into a 13-9 lead. With a fourth-quarter, 11-point lead, the Irish failed to convert their two-point attempt that would’ve stretched their lead to 13 points. After Northwestern converted their own two-point play, they made a game-tying field goal after Cam McDaniel fumbled the ball as the Irish were running out the clock. Had the Irish gone for (and converted) a PAT, the Wildcats would’ve needed to score a touchdown.

Moving back to Saturday night, Kelly’s decision needs to be put into context. After being held to just three points for the first 45 minutes of the game, C.J. Prosise broke a long catch and run for a touchdown in the opening minute of the fourth quarter. Clemson would be doing their best to kill the clock. Notre Dame’s first touchdown of the game brought the score within 12 points when Kelly decided to try and push the score within 10—likely remembering the very way Northwestern forced overtime.

After the game, Kelly said it was the right decision, citing his two-point conversion card and the time left in the game. On his Sunday afternoon teleconference, he said the same, giving a bit more rationale for his decision.

“We were down and we got the chance to put that game into a two-score with a field goal. I don’t chase the points until the fourth quarter, and our mathematical chart, which I have on the sideline with me and we have a senior adviser who concurred with me, and we said go for two. It says on our chart to go for two.

“We usually don’t use the chart until the fourth quarter because, again, we don’t chase the points. We went for two to make it a 10-point game. So we felt we had the wind with us so we would have to score a touchdown and a field goal because we felt like we probably only had three more possessions.

“The way they were running the clock, we’d probably get three possessions maximum and we’re going to have to score in two out of the three. So it was the smart decision to make, it was the right one to make. Obviously, you know, if we catch the two-point conversion, which was wide open, then we just kick the extra point and we’ve got a different outcome.”

That logic and rationale is why I had no problem with the decision when it happened in real time. But not everybody agrees.

Perhaps the strongest rebuke of the decision came from Irish Illustrated’s Tim Prister, who had this to say about the decision in his (somewhat appropriately-titled) weekly Point After column:

Hire another analyst or at least assign someone to the task of deciphering the Beautiful Mind-level math problem that seems to be vexing the Notre Dame brain-trust when a dweeb with half-inch thick glasses and a pocket protector full of pens could tell you that in the game of football, you can’t chase points before it is time… (moving ahead)

…The more astonishing thing is that no one in the ever-growing football organization that now adds analysts and advisors on a regular basis will offer the much-needed advice. Making such decisions in the heat of battle is not easy. What one thinks of in front of the TV or in a press box does not come as clearly when you’re the one pulling the trigger for millions to digest.

And yet with this ever-expanding entourage, Notre Dame still does not have anyone who can scream through the headphones to the head coach, “Coach, don’t go for two!”

If someone, anyone within the organization had the common sense and then the courage to do so, the Irish wouldn’t have lost every game in November of 2014 and would have had a chance to win in overtime against Clemson Saturday night.

My biggest gripe about the decision was the indecision that came along with the choice. Scoring on a big-play tends to stress your team as special teams players shuffle onto the field and the offense comes off. But Notre Dame’s use of a timeout was a painful one, and certainly should’ve been spared considering the replay review that gave Notre Dame’s coaching staff more time to make a decision.

For what it’s worth, Kelly’s decision was probably similar to the one many head coaches would make. And it stems from the original two-point conversion chart that Dick Vermeil developed back in the 1970s.

The original chart didn’t account for success rate or time left in the game. As Kelly mentioned before, Notre Dame uses one once it’s the fourth quarter.

It’s a debate that won’t end any time soon. And certainly one that will have hindsight on the side of the “kick the football” argument.