IBG: Turning the page to Michigan

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As an 18-year-old freshman, I had no idea just what my first big-time college football game would be like. Sure, I had sat in a half-empty Metrodome once or twice, watching the hometown Gophers take one on the chin to a team like Houston or Purdue, but I wasn’t quite prepared for the absolute pandemonium that took over that Saturday morning in early September, when the 4th floor of Stanford Hall erupted at 7 a.m. and the day ended celebrating in the Stonehenge fountain across from LaFortune.

That the Irish’s victory over the defending national champion Michigan Wolverines was my first game was almost unfair for a kid that’d never stepped foot in Notre Dame Stadium before. It would never get better than that first day.

There are things I’ve learned in the years since that first time. Most of it having to do with just how contentious the ND-UM rivalry is. Irish fans and Wolverines fans don’t seem to like each other much, and sure take delight in the other program’s misfortunes. As a kid that swapped freely between a Michigan hat and a Notre Dame lid, that kind of polygamy would be shocking to see now.

Neither program is where they want to be, but Saturday night’s game still takes center stage in the college football world. And after seeing the Irish lay an incredibly smelly egg last week, and the Wolverines look anything but dominant against cupcake Western Michigan, there’s a lot to be discovered in prime-time Saturday night. (Discover it together, with the return of an old-fashioned live-blog!)

As we’ll try to do every week, we’re joining the Irish Blogger Gathering and (almost) answering all the questions posed to us. This time, they come from the feisty fellows over at Her Loyal Sons, who do their best to not let their disdain for the Wolverines get too in the way of their questions.

HLS asked, I did my best to answer:

Well that really sucked. Please describe how you feel about the loss using lyrics from a pop diva’s song. Bonus points for video or pictures. (Something good has to come out of last week.)

There’s a lot of things I’m competent at, but quoting current pop diva lyrics isn’t one of them. That said, you’ve got to think that Britney Spears’ “Oops!… I did it again,” fits pretty perfectly for Irish fans.

Tough not to like Brit in that red spacesuit…

While we all want to move on, last week’s game can teach us many things about the ’11 Irish. After seeing what Week One brought us, do you find yourself more confident, less confident or still confused as hell about Notre Dame’s chances against Michigan?

I think you definitely have to feel less confident about what we thought the Irish would be, but I don’t think anybody should jump to conclusions until very late Saturday night, when we see how the Irish come out of Ann Arbor. If Notre Dame walks away with a win, then we can take a look at a two-game sample size and still hope to learn more against Michigan State.

As for this weekend, this match-up usually strikes fear into the heart of Irish fans, and for good reason. On paper, Notre Dame should’ve won the last two games, and still found themselves losing in absolutely painstaking ways both years. Having watched the mini-game the Wolverines played against Western Michigan, regardless of how vanilla they played, there wasn’t anything that impressive about the performance, and it’s clear the defense is still very much a work in progress.

Let’s say Notre Dame only turned the ball over three times last week, and won the football game by ten points. I’d expect the line to be about a touchdown. The fact that it’s 3.5 points, even though the Irish lost last week and Michigan is playing in front of the best homefield advantage they can historically create, that goes to tell you what wiseguys think about these teams.

That said, I have absolutely no clue what’s going to happen. Nothing would surprise me.

Other than quarterback, which position group pleasantly surprised you this past week? Which disappointed? What player absolutely must see more time in Week 2?

You’ve got to be happy with what you saw out of the nose tackle position, with Louis Nix being as good as advertised and Sean Cwynar chipping in four tackles. I’d also add the offensive line, which looked pretty impressive, save a few tough plays for Taylor Dever and Braxston Cave. Disappointing? I guess you’ve got to target the secondary. Both Gary Gray and Harrison Smith had multiple major penalties, and they weren’t able to get an interception from B.J. Daniels, a guy who gave turnovers away last year like lollipops. I want to add Special Teams into the big disappointment column as well. Ruffer misses a chip shot, Turk once again flubs punts after hitting beauties in warmups and some shoddy punt coverage… a really terrible day for Mike Elston’s troops.

As for someone that better see more playing time, I’d love to see what Cierre Wood can do when he’s not taken out of the gameplan after halftime.

Tommy Rees will lead the Irish offense this week. Do you agree with Brian Kelly’s call? Either way, what part of Crist’s game will the Irish O miss the most, if any?

After saying all offseason that Crist was going to win the starting job, it feels a little weird to go back and support Tommy Rees after one mediocre half by Dayne. That said, I’m 100 percent in favor of the switch, even if it’s giving Crist a pretty raw deal. Maybe we thought BK was paying Rees lip-service when he said that the QB race was as close as it was, but Dayne’s microprocessor just doesn’t move as quickly as Tommy’s — and in this offense, that’s what matters. If you weren’t sure of it before last Saturday, you should be now.

That Kelly was able to pull the plug on the Crist era quickly shouldn’t be that surprising. Whether it be injury or preference, Brian Kelly has used a lot of quarterbacks in his day. Will the Irish miss anything Dayne can do? Probably, as his physical skillset is pretty impressive. But Crist has always been a square peg from a round hole in this offense, and the senior leader’s development has been stunted by an unfavorable depth chart and some difficult injuries, all to go along with some accuracy issues, a fatal flaw in a Brian Kelly offense.

What’s the key to beating the Wolverines this week. Just one thing. Not two. One.

Easiest question I’ve heard all year: Containing Denard Robinson.

Make your over-under picks:

O/U on Michael Floyd’s receiving total for this coming weekend: 154 — Over. Rees is going to have the ball going to Floyd early and often.

O/U on Robinson’s rushing total: 100 — Over. But barely.

O/U on ND’s number of turnovers: 2 — Under. I see ball security being something far more important this week, and while Michigan did a nice job of getting a few turnovers last week, I think Rees is going to do a good job against Greg Mattison’s blitzing defense.

O/U on number of times Kelly is caught “purple monstering” (read: yelling) on camera: 2 — Believe it or not, I think BK knows he probably went a little overboard with his hysterics last weekend, and I think it was a confluence of events that led to the geyser he blew on Jones. If you’re looking for a reason for Kelly to remain cool, it’s that he’s on the road. He’ll need to keep everybody under control, and a calm demeanor might be what the doctor ordered. So under.

Michigan: Just another Opponent, Enemy, or Rival? Explain.

I think it’s more enemy than rival. Brady Hoke has two clocks ticking in his lockerroom. One for the big game against Ohio State, the other for the in-state battle against the Spartans. The Irish and the Wolverines are more Hatfields and McCoys than traditional rivals.

It’s one of those bizarre hatreds between two schools that are probably far more similar to each other than they’d like to acknowledge, but still have just enough apart that they’ll never come close to conceding anything.

In other words, just one more reason why college football is great.

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 4 Te’von Coney, linebacker

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-1, 235 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Junior with two years of eligibility remaining including the 2017 season.
Depth chart: Coney is the primary backup behind both senior captains Nyles Morgan and Greer Martini. With little other experience among the Irish linebackers, if either Morgan or Martini needs a breather or rolls an ankle, Coney will be called upon. For that matter, he has played enough in the past, he may see action simply to keep Martini fresh. Morgan fits into that previous sentence, as well, but given his track record, it seems unlikely he comes off the field much aside from injury or rout.
Recruiting: Holding offers from Clemson, Miami and Alabama, the Under Armour All-American’s recruitment came down to Notre Dame and his homestate Florida Gators. When the latter dispatched head coach Will Muschamp, the see-saw tilted toward the Irish for good. A consensus four-star prospect, rivals.com rated Coney the No. 6 inside linebacker in the class of 2015, the No. 20 recruit in Florida and the No. 118 overall player in the country.

CAREER TO DATE
Though he enrolled early as a freshman, Coney saw little action as a freshman. When he did get a chance following Jaylon Smith’s injury in the Fiesta Bowl against Ohio State, Coney injured his shoulder only plays later. The injury kept Coney out of 2016’s spring practices.

He started most of last season, not getting the nod in the season-opener or against Army or Navy. The latter two can be attributed to their option-specific offenses, and the Texas distinction may have traced to Coney’s arrest for marijuana possession last August.

2015: 12 games, 13 tackles, 0.5 tackles for loss, excelled in kickoff coverage duties.
2016: 12 games, nine starts, 62 tackles, 1.5 tackles for loss.

Coney’s 62 tackles last season were fourth on the team and are third among this year’s returnees with linebacker James Onwualu being the exception.

QUOTE(S)
Irish coach Brian Kelly did not spend much time this spring discussing his linebackers, theoretically because it is the one spot on Notre Dame’s defense not sparking too much concern with three former starters to man two positions.

At the end of March, Kelly included Coney and Martini in a listing of position battles. Every indication points to Martini as a clear-cut starter but take that moment to mean Kelly sees Coney as starting material, as well.

WHAT KEITH ARNOLD PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
Athletically, Coney feels like the best fit for the starting job. But inevitably, this will come down to how quickly he gets back into the swing of things and how impactful Greer Martini can be in this defense.

“A healthy Coney is a starter in this scheme. But his development as a player was put on hold this offseason. Coney’s still a sophomore who missed half a year in the weight room after just 61 snaps — the majority coming against UMass — so it’s hard to say he’s a better option than Martini, acknowledging that the veteran might be playing slightly out of position.

“Still, this staff has a major belief that Coney will be an impact player. I’m just reluctant to think it’ll happen in 2016 until we get more information about his shoulder injury.”

2017 OUTLOOK
Coney’s shoulder did not hamper him last season, and that alone was of note given the difficulties shoulder injuries often cause. Yet he does not project as the starter against Temple in 36 days. That may be as much a credit to Martini as anything else. It also may simply reflect Martini’s more natural fit in Irish defensive coordinator Mike Elko’s scheme.

A cynic here might wonder if Martini will get the initial starting nod as a default to a captain. Even if that is the case — and this is not to say it is — he will play well; Coney will need to earn the chance to start.

He is certainly capable of that, but whether he does or not, Coney will see plenty of action this season. Notre Dame just does not have other options. Junior Asmar Bilal will be devoted to a rover rotation along with senior Drue Tranquill, the former seeing more action against run-oriented attacks. Sophomore Jamir Jones is a linebacker in name only at this point, destined for a future on the defensive line but not yet there due to the lack of depth in this unit. Freshmen Drew White and David Adams are exactly that: freshmen. That leaves sophomore Jonathan Jones (no relation) to aid Coney in backing up Morgan and Martini. He did not see any action last season.

Thus, Coney is essentially the entire second-unit at linebacker. Provided Morgan, Martini and Coney all stay healthy, that is not an item of concern. A rotation of those three in nearly any ratio should serve the Irish well.

DOWN THE ROAD
Both Morgan and Martini will be out of eligibility following 2017, all but guaranteeing Coney a starting gig next season, most likely in Martini’s role. The question will be who starts alongside him, and that question becomes more intriguing with each new linebacker commitment this week. No matter who it is, Coney will be counted on to complement Tranquill as the veterans on what will continue to be a young defense.

Knowing that clear future is ahead of him should push Coney to stay engaged in all facets this season.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95: Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 92)
No. 94: Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 95)
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92: Jonathon MacCollister; defensive end (originally theorized as No. 46)
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87: Michael Young, receiver (originally theorized as No. 84)
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84: Cole Kmet, tight end (originally theorized as No. 90)
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 76: Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman (originally theorized as No. 65)
No. 75: Josh Lugg, offensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 73)
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center
No. 53: Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman
No. 48: Greer Martini, inside linebacker
No. 47: Kofi Wardlow, defensive end
No. 45: Jonathan Jones, inside linebacker
No. 44: Jamir Jones, linebacker/defensive lineman
No. 42: Julian Okwara, defensive end
No. 41: Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 94)
No. 40: Drew White, linebacker
No. 39: Jonathan Doerer, kicker (originally theorized as No. 52)
No. 38: Deon McIntosh, running back/receiver
No. 35: David Adams, linebacker
No. 34: Tony Jones, Jr., running back
No. 33: Josh Adams, running back
No. 32: D.J. Morgan, safety
No. 30: Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, rover
No. 29: Kevin Stepherson, receiver
No. 28: Nicco Fertitta, safety
No. 27: Julian Love, cornerback
No. 26: Ashton White, safety
No. 25: Jafar Armstrong, receiver (originally theorized as No. 87)
No. 24: Nick Coleman, safety
No. 23: Drue Tranquill, rover
No. 22: Asmar Bilal, rover
No. 21: Jalen Elliott, safety
No. 20: Shaun Crawford, cornerback
No. 19: Justin Yoon, kicker
No. 18: Troy Pride, cornerback
No. 17: Isaiah Robertson, safety
No. 16: Cameron Smith, receiver
No. 15: C.J. Holmes, running back
No. 14: Devin Studstill, safety
No. 13: Avery Davis, quarterback
No. 13: Jordan Genmark Heath, safety
No. 12: Ian Book, quarterback
No. 12: Alohi Gilman, safety
No. 11: Freddy Canteen, receiver
No. 10: Chris Finke, receiver
No. 9: Daelin Hayes, defensive end
No. 8: Donte Vaughn, cornerback
No. 7: Brandon Wimbush, quarterback
No. 7: Nick Watkins, cornerback
No. 6: Equanimeous St. Brown, receiver
No. 5: Nyles Morgan, linebacker

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship

Four-star LB Jack Lamb continues Notre Dame’s strong recruiting week

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In years to come, Irish fans may want to remember the last week of July 2017.

Notre Dame landed the commitment of a second four-star linebacker in the span of three days when Jack Lamb (Great Oaks High School, Temecula, Calif.) chose the Irish over UCLA on Thursday. Lamb follows Shayne Simon (St. Peter’s Prep; Jersey City, N.J.), who picked Notre Dame over Michigan on Tuesday. For that matter, rivals.com three-star running back Jahmir Smith (Lee County H.S.; Sanford, N.C.) started the successful recruiting week with a Sunday evening commitment.

“My family has taught me that if you want to be great at something, you have to make yourself uncomfortable,” Lamb wrote on Twitter. “It is my goal to one day be a great football player, a great student, and a great contributor to my community. Getting out of my comfort zone means moving to a new place, seeing new things, and being challenged in ways I have yet to be challenged.

“In an effort to accomplish my goals, and to begin a new chapter in my life I have selected The University of Notre Dame as my future home.”

Lamb held offers from most of the Pac 12, as well as Oklahoma, Vanderbilt and many others, including his father’s alma mater, Penn State. An Under Armour All-American, rivals.com rates Lamb the No. 4 inside linebacker in the class, the No. 11 prospect in California and the No. 97 overall recruit in the country.

RELATED READING: LB Shayne Simon’s commitment could solve rover questions of the future
RB Jahmir Smith makes Notre Dame’s 13th commitment, 2nd RB in class of 2018

At 6-foot-4 and 220 pounds, he will have a chance to contribute immediately at inside linebacker for the Irish. Notre Dame may not have many, if any, worries about its defense’s second-line in 2017, but it will have a lot of question marks once senior captains Nyles Morgan and Greer Martini finish their collegiate careers this season.

Fellow senior captain Drue Tranquill will have another year of eligibility remaining, however, he mans the rover position, handling quite a different set of responsibilities than the other linebackers face. Junior Asmar Bilal backs up Tranquill and will presumably stay at rover for at least another season to provide some depth while freshman Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah learns the system.

From there, only junior Te’von Coney has seen any action at linebacker for Notre Dame, with sophomore linebacker Jonathan Jones and freshmen David White and Drew Adams providing the current version of depth. A possible early enrollee in the spring of 2018, Lamb would be only a semester behind White and Adams when it comes to time spent learning defensive coordinator Mike Elko’s scheme, working in a collegiate weight room and adjusting to a college course load.

Lamb will have competition from his own class, though. While Simon will likely join Owusu-Koramoah in learning the rover position, rivals.com four-star Matthew Bauer (Cathedral Prep School; Erie, Pa.) and consensus three-star Ovie Oghoufo (Harrison H.S.; Farmington Hills, Mich.) each committed to the Irish about a year ago exactly. (Bauer on Aug. 3, 2016 and Oghoufo on July 22, 2016.)

Including Lamb, Simon, the two long-time linebacker pledges and Smith, Notre Dame’s class of 2018 is now at 15 recruits, with space open for at least a handful more. The current priorities likely remain cornerbacks, a receiver (consensus four-star Kevin Austin [North Broward; Coconut Creek, Fla.] is scheduled to announce Aug. 11) and some linemen on both sides of the ball.

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 5 Nyles Morgan, linebacker

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-1, 238 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Senior with only one season of eligibility remaining
Depth chart: Morgan will start as the middle linebacker in defensive coordinator Mike Elko’s scheme. Junior Te’von Coney essentially backs up both Morgan and fellow senior linebacker Greer Martini. If another reserve is needed, the Irish will most likely turn to sophomore Jonathan Jones before looking to the freshmen duo of Drew White and David Adams.
Recruiting: A rivals.com four-star prospect, Morgan whittled his recruitment down from a lengthy list including Alabama, Florida and Michigan. His final decision was between Notre Dame and Ole Miss. Yes, that Ole Miss. As more and more is learned about Mississippi circa 2013 and 2014, the U.S. Army All-American’s decision stands out as increasingly insightful. Rivals rated the first-team USA Today All-American as the class’s No. 5 inside linebacker, the No. 2 recruit in Illinois and the No. 72 overall player in the country.

CAREER TO DATE
Morgan went from minimal action to a starting role his freshman season when Joe Schmidt went down with an injury against Navy. Morgan started four of the season’s five final games, with the exception being against USC. He nonetheless made 11 tackles against the Trojans, his third consecutive game with a tackles total in the double digits.

With Schmidt back to health in 2015, Morgan’s role returned to special teams and mop-up duties before leading the defense last year.

2014: 12 games, four starts, 47 tackles, 3.5 tackles for loss, 0.5 sacks.
2015: 13 games, 17 tackles, one forced fumble.
2016: 12 games, 12 starts, 94 tackles, six tackles for loss, four sacks, one fumble recovery.

Morgan’s 94 tackles and four sacks each led the Irish last year, and his six tackles for loss is second among returning defenders, trailing Martini by one takedown behind the line of scrimmage.

QUOTE(S)
Perhaps the most-illuminating mention of Morgan in the past eight months came on National Signing Day, an odd piece of timing for a rising senior. Irish coach Brian Kelly mentioned Morgan while describing Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah’s recruiting visit only a week earlier. Kelly meant to be praising Owusu-Koramoah’s dedication to football, but he also showed part of the reasoning in naming Morgan a captain for 2017.

“We hosted [Owusu-Koramoah] with Nyles Morgan, “Kelly said. “When you host somebody, you want them to see Notre Dame and see the social aspects. These guys didn’t leave the film room. It was like they were joined at the hip for six hours just talking football.”

WHAT KEITH ARNOLD PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
Notre Dame’s leading tackler. And it might not even be close. Yes, he’ll need to stay healthy. And yes, he’ll [need] to cut down on some of the mental mistakes that can turn a three-yard gain into a 30-yarder. But Morgan is the perfect prototype for middle linebacker in [former Irish defensive coordinator Brian] VanGorder’s scheme — and that’s what sold him on Notre Dame in the first place.

“It won’t be all perfect for Morgan. I wonder if there’s a role for him on third downs, especially in passing situations. But his athleticism, toughness and nose for the football make this a relatively easy forecast.”

2017 OUTLOOK
If a healthy Morgan does not again lead the Irish in tackles, it will be a good sign for the implementation of the rover, Elko’s preferred defensive wrinkle. More precisely, it will be a sign senior Drue Tranquill took to that position better than anyone could have expected. Otherwise, expect Morgan to lead the way. (Last year he topped Tranquill’s second-place tackle total by 15.)

In the 99-to-2 entry for No. 45 Jonathan Jones, this space set the season’s over/under on defensive snaps missed by a healthy Morgan in competitive situations at 5.5. That may seem bold, but Notre Dame does not have many options behind him, nor would it likely use them if it did, and Morgan’s career arc shows why not.

As a freshman, Morgan may have racked up tackles commiserate with his playing time, but he also missed tackles and struggled as much as he succeeded. The speed of the game and concepts needing grasping were too much, it seemed. If he was forced into playing time as a sophomore, it is safe to presume he would have fared better, but still not as well as he did last year.

Continuing that progression this season should lead to 100-plus tackles, two handfuls of tackles for loss and perhaps a repeat of last year’s four sacks. Again, though, if Morgan falls short of those figures, it may actually bode well for the defense. It would mean Tranquill is flying to the ball unencumbered by coverage concerns, it would mean the defensive tackles are shedding blockers and getting to ballcarriers on their own, and it would mean sophomore defensive end Daelin Hayes is bringing down the quarterback before Morgan can get to him.

DOWN THE ROAD
Morgan will be drafted. His frame and leadership will entice more than a few NFL teams, but it would take a truly transcendent senior season and excellent combine results to make him an early-round pick. That is as much due to the modern NFL as it is to Morgan’s potential.

He has yet to reach his ceiling, though, and that ceiling certainly entails an NFL career.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95: Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 92)
No. 94: Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 95)
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92: Jonathon MacCollister; defensive end (originally theorized as No. 46)
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87: Michael Young, receiver (originally theorized as No. 84)
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84: Cole Kmet, tight end (originally theorized as No. 90)
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 76: Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman (originally theorized as No. 65)
No. 75: Josh Lugg, offensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 73)
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center
No. 53: Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman
No. 48: Greer Martini, inside linebacker
No. 47: Kofi Wardlow, defensive end
No. 45: Jonathan Jones, inside linebacker
No. 44: Jamir Jones, linebacker/defensive lineman
No. 42: Julian Okwara, defensive end
No. 41: Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 94)
No. 40: Drew White, linebacker
No. 39: Jonathan Doerer, kicker (originally theorized as No. 52)
No. 38: Deon McIntosh, running back/receiver
No. 35: David Adams, linebacker
No. 34: Tony Jones, Jr., running back
No. 33: Josh Adams, running back
No. 32: D.J. Morgan, safety
No. 30: Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, rover
No. 29: Kevin Stepherson, receiver
No. 28: Nicco Fertitta, safety
No. 27: Julian Love, cornerback
No. 26: Ashton White, safety
No. 25: Jafar Armstrong, receiver (originally theorized as No. 87)
No. 24: Nick Coleman, safety
No. 23: Drue Tranquill, rover
No. 22: Asmar Bilal, rover
No. 21: Jalen Elliott, safety
No. 20: Shaun Crawford, cornerback
No. 19: Justin Yoon, kicker
No. 18: Troy Pride, cornerback
No. 17: Isaiah Robertson, safety
No. 16: Cameron Smith, receiver
No. 15: C.J. Holmes, running back
No. 14: Devin Studstill, safety
No. 13: Avery Davis, quarterback
No. 13: Jordan Genmark Heath, safety
No. 12: Ian Book, quarterback
No. 12: Alohi Gilman, safety
No. 11: Freddy Canteen, receiver
No. 10: Chris Finke, receiver
No. 9: Daelin Hayes, defensive end
No. 8: Donte Vaughn, cornerback
No. 7: Brandon Wimbush, quarterback
No. 7: Nick Watkins, cornerback
No. 6: Equanimeous St. Brown, receiver

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 6 Equanimeous St. Brown, receiver

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-5, 204 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Junior with two years of eligibility remaining including the 2017 season.
Depth chart: St. Brown will start as the field receiver, otherwise known as the X. Even as he may move around from the field to the boundary, St. Brown will be a threat for nearly every offensive snap.
Recruiting: A consensus four-star recruit, St. Brown held offers from 10 of the Pac-12 programs with Oregon and Oregon State the outliers, as well as from LSU, Miami and Vanderbilt, among others. The Under Armour All-American waited until National Signing Day to commit to the Irish. Rivals.com listed him as the No. 15 receiver in the class of 2015, the No. 23 prospect in California and the No. 144 player in the country.

CAREER TO DATE
After a ho-hum, limited-action, injury-shortened freshman season, St. Brown broke out last year, to say the least. St. Brown led Notre Dame in receptions, receiving yards and receiving touchdowns, establishing himself as then-quarterback DeShone Kizer’s most-dangerous as well as most-consistent target.

2015: Seven games, one reception for eight yards before a shoulder injury ended his debut campaign. St. Brown blocked a punt against USC.
2016: 12 games, 12 starts, 58 receptions for 961 yards and nine touchdowns. Highlighting his season, St. Brown took four catches for 182 yards and two touchdowns against Syracuse, including a 79-yard score on the first play from scrimmage. He also logged 116 receiving yards against Duke.

QUOTES
When a sophomore comes about two average-length catches short of a 60-reception, 1,000-yard and 10-touchdown season, not much needs to be worried about the following spring. Instead, Irish coach Brian Kelly noted the improvements in the receiver corps around its standout, though St. Brown is obviously working to stay ahead of the pack, as well.

“I see better balance,” Kelly said in late March. “We have some guys that will come up to the level [St. Brown] was at least year to give the quarterback and the offense a little more balance than we had last year. [St. Brown] will be a better player. He’s working on some of the weaknesses that he has, which limits him in certain areas, and he’s diligently working on those.

“You’re going to see a better supporting cast across the board, which will give us much more balance. More importantly, it’s going to give us much more consistency from an offensive standpoint.”

WHAT KEITH ARNOLD PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
The drop-off from a veteran like Chris Brown to a receiver with one career catch is sizable. But from a physical skills perspective, St. Brown can do everything needed to be a standout, he just needs to grow up in a hurry.

“Predicting a breakout sophomore season like the ones Golden Tate or Will Fuller had isn’t fair. But with a strong running game and Torii Hunter across from him, St. Brown will have plenty of opportunities to make big plays, he just needs to seize those chances.

“Can St. Brown put himself on course to be the next great Irish receiver? The hype has slowed, but there’s no reason the answer should be no.

“This camp has been all about young receivers finding consistency. While [current-sophomore] Kevin Stepherson seems to have taken most of the excitement, I think St. Brown will be the best of the bunch — at least in 2016.

“But let’s keep expectations in check. I’ll set the bar somewhere between Torii Hunter’s 2015 and Chris Brown’s junior season, with St Brown catching somewhere around 30 balls if he stays healthy and holds onto his starting job.”

2017 OUTLOOK
Suffice it to say, St. Brown exceeded any and all expectations in 2016, beginning with his tumbling touchdown against Texas. In a way, those successes make it likely St. Brown falls short of expectations in 2017. If he does appear to take a step back, whether that is shown in statistics or not, it could be partly due to the added depth Kelly referred to.

Notre Dame has more options at receiver this year, losing only Hunter form last year’s top-five receivers, and only him and [Purdue transfer] Corey Holmes among those with double-digit catches. Meanwhile, junior quarterback Brandon Wimbush will have an ascending junior Miles Boykin to target at the boundary position and returning, to much hype, junior tight end Alizé Mack drawing attention, as well.

Defenses will not be able to key on St. Brown this season, but Wimbush will not be doing so, either. Overall, that behooves the team, even if it lessens St. Brown’s chances of gaining 39 more yards than last season to reach a four-digit total.

DOWN THE ROAD
Do not be surprised if St. Brown declares for the NFL after this, his junior, season. This is a player with an intellect capable enough to speak three languages fluently (German, French and he dabbles in a little English). He will presumably be close to graduation by the end of 2018’s spring semester. A strong season with a few notable highlights could solidify a strong draft status.

That said, do not be surprised if St. Brown returns to Notre Dame for another year. If he does, that may be a positive indicator for the Irish for a few years beyond 2018. St. Brown’s youngest brother, Amon-Ra St. Brown, is the No. 1 receiver and No. 4 player overall in the class of 2018, per rivals.com, and is considering a list of scholarship offers even more impressive than his oldest brother’s was. Name a prominent college football program and Amon-Ra has heard from its coaching staff, including Alabama, Michigan, Ohio State, Miami, Oklahoma and Oregon (though still no note of Oregon State).

If the consensus five-star chooses Notre Dame over USC and Stanford, perhaps Equanimeous St. Brown will not be able to resist spending a season lining up alongside his brother. However, it should be noted, the middle St. Brown brother, Osiris, will be a freshman receiver at Stanford this season.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95: Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 92)
No. 94: Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 95)
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92: Jonathon MacCollister; defensive end (originally theorized as No. 46)
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87: Michael Young, receiver (originally theorized as No. 84)
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84: Cole Kmet, tight end (originally theorized as No. 90)
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 76: Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman (originally theorized as No. 65)
No. 75: Josh Lugg, offensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 73)
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center
No. 53: Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman
No. 48: Greer Martini, inside linebacker
No. 47: Kofi Wardlow, defensive end
No. 45: Jonathan Jones, inside linebacker
No. 44: Jamir Jones, linebacker/defensive lineman
No. 42: Julian Okwara, defensive end
No. 41: Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 94)
No. 40: Drew White, linebacker
No. 39: Jonathan Doerer, kicker (originally theorized as No. 52)
No. 38: Deon McIntosh, running back/receiver
No. 35: David Adams, linebacker
No. 34: Tony Jones, Jr., running back
No. 33: Josh Adams, running back
No. 32: D.J. Morgan, safety
No. 30: Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, rover
No. 29: Kevin Stepherson, receiver
No. 28: Nicco Fertitta, safety
No. 27: Julian Love, cornerback
No. 26: Ashton White, safety
No. 25: Jafar Armstrong, receiver (originally theorized as No. 87)
No. 24: Nick Coleman, safety
No. 23: Drue Tranquill, rover
No. 22: Asmar Bilal, rover
No. 21: Jalen Elliott, safety
No. 20: Shaun Crawford, cornerback
No. 19: Justin Yoon, kicker
No. 18: Troy Pride, cornerback
No. 17: Isaiah Robertson, safety
No. 16: Cameron Smith, receiver
No. 15: C.J. Holmes, running back
No. 14: Devin Studstill, safety
No. 13: Avery Davis, quarterback
No. 13: Jordan Genmark Heath, safety
No. 12: Ian Book, quarterback
No. 12: Alohi Gilman, safety
No. 11: Freddy Canteen, receiver
No. 10: Chris Finke, receiver
No. 9: Daelin Hayes, defensive end
No. 8: Donte Vaughn, cornerback
No. 7: Brandon Wimbush, quarterback
No. 7: Nick Watkins, cornerback

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship