Five things we learned: Notre Dame 59, Air Force 33

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On a gorgeous Saturday afternoon in South Bend, the Irish offense sprinted out to an early lead and never looked back, scoring 59 points — 42 of them in the first half alone — as Notre Dame rolled to a 59-33 win over the Air Force Academy. On a Saturday where sunshine and blue skies provided a perfect setting for football, Brian Kelly‘s offensive juggernaut did its best to one-up the weather, no small feat in early October.

Just how impressive were the Irish offensively in the first half? Consider these six touchdown drives:

  • Eight plays for 81 yards in 2:47 on their first drive. Michael Floyd with the touchdown catch.
  • Nine plays for 59 yards in 3:33 on their second drive. Tyler Eifert with the touchdown catch.
  • Four plays for 51 yards in 1:41 on their third drive. Robby Toma with the touchdown catch.
  • Five plays for 38 yards in 2:02 on their fourth drive. Jonas Gray with the touchdown run.
  • Six plays for 44 yards in 2:21 on their fifth drive. Cierre Wood with the touchdown run.
  • Six plays for 7 yards in 1:06 on their sixth drive. Theo Riddick with the touchdown catch.

That’s six first half drives and six touchdowns, each capped off by six different players.

“We’ve got very good diversity within our offense,” Kelly said after the game. “We’re hard to defend right now.”

Hard to defend might be an understatement, as the Irish racked up 59 points, the most points scored by an Irish team since Lou Holtz‘s 62-0 blasting of Rutgers in his final game in Notre Dame Stadium.

Let’s find out what else we learned in Notre Dame’s 59-33 victory over Air Force.

1. The Irish have put together a devastating rushing attack.

With Cierre Wood and Jonas Gray giving the Irish their best one-two combination since Ryan Grant and Julius Jones, Notre Dame has balance on offense like they haven’t had in a very long time. The Irish racked up 266 rushing yards, continuing a string of impressive games. The Irish have run for 735 yards over the last three wins, their most in a three-game span since 2003. And the best thing about it? It was quarterback Andrew Hendrix that led the team in rushing, with 111 yards.

The Irish ran for a gaudy 9.2 yards per carry, numbers that would have been even better if the Irish didn’t run for just seven yards on their final seven carries of the afternoon. Take those runs out and the Irish ran for 259 yards on 22 carries, roughly 12 yards a carry. To put it into context, Julius Jones ran for 262 yards on 24 carries in his record-setting performance against Pitt in 2003. The Irish didn’t need to put the weight on one man’s back, and with Wood and Gray carrying the load, and Hendrix adding a zone-read wrinkle into the mix, the Irish’s offense — led by some incredible work up front by Ed Warinner‘s troops — did some devastating work.

“The pieces are starting to come together for us,” Kelly said of the offensive balance. “We’re getting there. It starts really with the running game and the ability to run the football.”

2. Andrew Hendrix adds a new dimension to the offense. And he makes Tommy Rees better.

Kelly hinted at it earlier this week, and sophomore Andrew Hendrix’s debut at quarterback was about as impressive as you could ask for. Hendrix was perfect throwing the football, operated from six different formations while running the ball with conviction, only stopping himself when he ran out of gas at the one-yard line on a 78-yard scamper.

Used as a change of pace quarterback while mixing in with Tommy Rees, Hendrix gave the Irish offense another running look while also keeping defenses honest with some efficient passing. It’s all part of a plan installed to evolve the offensive gameplan and use Hendrix’s skillset to make Rees even better.

“Andrew does not have all of the grasp on the offense that he needs,” Kelly said. “But he certainly is somebody that can go in the game and do good things.

“A lot of this has been crafted towards how do we make Tommy Rees a better quarterback, instead of Andrew Hendrix just being out there. Now there’s so much versatility in which you have to defend.”

Kelly made it clear that Dayne Crist is still the No. 2 quarterback for the Irish. But after five games of wondering whether or not the Irish would use a change of pace quarterback, they rolled out the blueprint for how they want to use Hendrix, and he executed perfectly.

3. With a near perfect day, the maturation of Tommy Rees continues.

After struggling to keep the ball in the offense’s hands, Rees continues a run of really impressive play. The sophomore quarterback completed 23 of 32 passes for 261 yards, throwing four touchdowns to four different receivers in the first half — joining Brady Quinn as the only other Irish quarterback to ever throw for four scores in the game’s first thirty minutes.

“He’s growing as he goes here,” Kelly said of his sophomore quarterback. “I keep reminding you guys and hopefully you’ll start listening to me. He’s 8-1 as a starter and he continues to grow and develop and we are seeing that maturity.”

For a second straight game, Rees wasn’t sacked. And with time in the pocket, he showed his ability to be the perfect distributor for Kelly’s passing offense, finding seven different receivers and moving the Irish close to flawlessly throughout the afternoon.

The Irish converted 8 of 11 third downs, a devastating stat for Air Force, and identified just about all of Air Force’s exotic attempts to bring pressure. More importantly, he took care of the football — forcing only one or two balls into tight windows and making proper reads when he had one-on-one opportunities.

Rees has done plenty to show that he’s a capable pilot for the Irish’s offensive attack, but nothing more important than eliminating mistakes when the Irish had chances to put points on the board, and being more efficient in the scoring zone.

“I think a lot of it was on me not finishing drives,” Rees said after the game. “I really took it upon myself, just to make sure we are limiting mistakes. We have been so good between the 20s, so for us to go out two weeks in a row and capitalize on opportunities is a good feeling.”

With USC on the horizon, Rees will now have two weeks to prepare for a defense that forced the then freshman into the worst game of his Irish career.

4. The Irish offense gave the USC coaching staff plenty to talk about.

If you’re wondering why it seemed like Kelly and offensive coordinator Charley Molnar all but emptied the playbook against Air Force, it might be because they’ve got a special opponent coming up in two Saturdays. With the Trojans off this Saturday, Lane Kiffin and company had all afternoon to watch Notre Dame run all over the field, establishing various weapons and give a leaky Trojan defense even more to think about.

While he didn’t get the opportunity to return one, we saw Michael Floyd back to receive punts. After not running the ball with Theo Riddick all season, we saw Riddick pick up a nice gain on a reverse, and lead the team with eight catches for 83 yards and a touchdown. Empty set formations with five wide? Option pass plays? Kelly showed a variety of new looks, which stumped Air Force’s defense, but also added a few more hours to the next Trojan film session.

As the Irish reach the halfway point of the season, it’s clear they’ll head into a prime-time affair with USC armed with an offense that has multiple ways to hurt you and a second quarterback that will provide plenty of problems for defensive coordinators.

“I really couldn’t tell you,” Kelly responded when asked if Hendrix’s big game means more snaps in the weeks to come. “All I know is you’re going to have to defend him because he’s pretty good.”

Precisely why Kelly waited to reveal him this week.

5. There are still plenty of questions about Notre Dame’s ability to stop the option.

Now to the not-so-pretty part. The Irish really struggled defending Air Force’s offense. The Falcons came into Saturday with the No. 12 offense in the country, averaging just over 513 yards a game. They actually improved on that number, putting up 565 yards to the Irish’s 560, and ran the ball for a staggering 363 yards, nearly identical to their average total on the season.

Without Ethan Johnson, the Irish were forced to use a lot of Stephon Tuitt and Aaron Lynch, and the duo combined for six tackles, with Lynch contributing just one assisted tackle on the afternoon, while also getting flagged for a major penalty and a major screw-up, jumping offside on a 4th down field goal attempt that gave the Falcons a first down and a touchdown on the ensuing play.

Bob Diaco‘s game plan consisted of moving Jamoris Slaughter down into the box, replacing Prince Shembo in the base defense. The move worked, and Slaughter played his best game in an Irish uniform. He made a highlight reel interception and forced a fumble on the first defensive play of the game, supplying just what the Irish needed with two huge turnovers in a game where turnover margin was the most important stat of the day.

Yet the Irish also got gashed by both the option and the zone read, with Asher Clark running for 102 yards on just 11 carries, and the Falcons averaging 6.1 yards a carry on 60 runs. Harrison Smith led the Irish with 12 tackles, but struggled to come up and play support on the option pitch, missing a number of tackles. Manti Te’o was the lone bright spot in the option game, playing under control, making 2.5 tackles-for-loss to go along with his ten stops and one pass breakup.

Sure, Air Force racked up a ton of yardage in the games final minutes when the score was long out of hand. But Air Force converted a ridiculous five of five on fourth-down gambles and Tim Jefferson looked good completing several big passes for first downs. The Falcons present a challenge even Navy can’t replicate, but Diaco’s troops haven’t shown the ability to stop an option attack consistently. While the gamble with Slaughter was a good one, keeping Prince Shembo on the sideline, limiting Sean Cwynar’s snaps and using freshman Chase Hounshell for the first time after burning Kona Schwenke’s eligibility just a week ago are decisions that some people might question.

But with the Irish moving to 4-2 and riding a four-game winning streak into an off-week, the Irish’s impressive drubbing of Air Force showed one thing quite clearly: The most effective defense against a great option attack is a good offense.

The Irish showed that in spades.

 

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 46 (theoretically) Jonathon MacCollister, defensive end

Rivals.com
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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-3, 244 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Freshman yet to enroll
Depth chart: MacCollister finds himself behind two seniors (Jay Hayes and Andrew Trumbetti) and sophomore Khalid Kareem at defensive end.
Recruiting: A consensus three-star recruit, MacCollister chose Notre Dame from a lengthy offer list, which included Auburn, Clemson, Michigan State and Ohio State.

QUOTE(S)
Irish coach Brian Kelly noted MacCollister’s versatility on National Signing Day. When discussing MaCollister, fellow defensive end Kofi Wardlow had not yet officially committed to Notre Dame, making Maccollister the then-only dedicated pass-rusher in the class.

“Speaking of a guy that’s developing on the outside, Jonathan MacCollister … He’s long and athletic,” Kelly said. “Call him Big Bird. He’s a very athletic player that we’re going to play on the outside. He’s a guy that we think has the length, the athleticism that can play the defensive end position”

WHAT WE SAID WHEN WARDLOW’S NATIONAL LETTER OF INTENT ARRIVED
With Jalen Harris staying in the southwest, MacCollister may be the only true edge-rusher in this class. His length should serve him well in a three-down front, which is expected of new defensive coordinator Mike Elko.”

2017 OUTLOOK
Expect a year on the sidelines preserving eligibility for MacCollister. The Hayes/Trumbetti combination will likely take the vast majority of snaps at defensive end, with Kareem filling in only to an extent his performance demands. Finding additional chances for MacCollister would simply be more difficult than the limited handful would be worth.

DOWN THE ROAD
If MacCollister were to have a strong fall and subsequent spring, he could quickly find himself in the two-man combination at end. Trumbetti will be gone, and Hayes has yet — though that is a key three-letter word in this instance — shown enough consistency to think he would carry the pass-rush load on his own. In this instance, MacCollister would face competition from Kareem, but overcoming one player only a year his elder is far more feasible than any path to playing time for MacCollister this season.

A portion of MacCollister’s appeal in recruiting was his overall athleticism. As a tight end in high school, he displayed it frequently. Some projected his collegiate future would be as an offensive tackle, not on the defensive line.

That is not to say MacCollister will make that flip. Given Irish offensive line coach Harry Hiestand’s success in recruiting, converting a defensive lineman might be out-and-out unlikely. But it should be noted, as crazier things have certainly happened.

(For example, Notre Dame once played a home game delayed by rain in the second half for such a lengthy interval, a subsection of the student section had enough time and perseverance to sing all 99 verses of “99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall.”)


Aside from the five early enrollees, the numbers are not yet known for the Irish freshmen class. That is one of the admitted drawbacks to organizing this summer-long series numerically. But a little bit of educated guessing can garner estimates for those numbers, and those estimates can allow the series to proceed without pause. 

How are those estimates crafted? The first step is to take a look at certain NCAA rules, but the NCAA does not put recommendations on defensive players, broadening MacCollister’s options. When discussing incoming defensive ends, it made some sense to have MacCollister quickly follow Kofi Wardlow’s theoretical No. 47.

Jonathon MacCollister very well may not wear No. 46, but it is possible.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92 (theoretically): Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 90 (theoretically): Cole Kmet, tight end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87 (theoretically): Jafar Armstrong, receiver
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84 (theoretically): Michael Young, receiver
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 73: (theoretically) Josh Lugg, offensive tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 65: (theoretically) Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center
No. 53: Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman
No. 52: (theoretically) Jonathan Doerer, kicker
No. 48: Greer Martini, inside linebacker
No. 47: (theoretically) Kofi Wardlow, defensive end

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 47 (theoretically) Kofi Wardlow, defensive end

Rivals.com
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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-3, 210 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Freshman yet to enroll
Depth chart: Wardlow joins a youth movement among pass-rushers. Given their time already spent on campus and in practice, though, three sophomores remain ahead of Wardlow at defensive end. Even among those three, Daelin Hayes, Julian Okwara and Ade Ogundeji will have to scrap for playing time.
Recruiting: A consensus three-star recruit, Wardlow switched from a Maryland commitment at the last possible moment, making his decision on National Signing Day. The No. 47 defensive end in the country per rivals.com, Wardlow also considered offers from Michigan State and Virginia Tech.

QUOTE(S)
Irish coach Brian Kelly received word during his National Signing Day press conference he could announce Wardlow’s commitment. To some extent, Kelly expected that chance, but it was still assuredly a moment of relief to confirm the 21st and final member of the 2017 recruiting class.

“A new guy has come in, Kofi Wardlow, defensive end,” Kelly said. “We were looking for one more pass-rusher. We think Kofi has some elite skills at the defensive end position where he can grow and develop. We really liked his athleticism and his size, really impressed with him in person.

“… He really fit the profile. He reminded us of a young Romeo Okwara, not quite as long, but is actually thicker than [Okwara] is. He’s just a really young, raw, extremely athletic guy, a guy that we think can develop into a really nice edge player for us.”

WHAT WE SAID WHEN WARDLOW’S NATIONAL LETTER OF INTENT ARRIVED
Bolstering the edge rush is never a bad thing, especially in a class with only one other defensive end. Wardlow completes this Notre Dame recruiting cycle on a high note, and even that psychological factor alone should not be underrated.

“Wardlow has played football for only two seasons, focusing on basketball in the past. Naturally, that leaves him with as much raw potential as realized. Furthermore, that basketball background established a level of agility and understanding of footwork not often seen from players of Wardlow’s size.”

2017 OUTLOOK
With only two falls of football to his name, it would be in Wardlow’s best interests to spend a season preserving eligibility and developing a deeper understanding of the game, not to mention a more college-ready physicality. That is also the most-likely scenario, unless it is deemed he is needed on special teams. For these purposes, let’s presume that will not be the case. Irish special teams coordinator Brian Polian has openly wanted more bodies for his units, but in doing so he referred to linebackers and safeties. Wardlow may have a lithe body, but he is very much a defensive end, not a linebacker.

DOWN THE ROAD
Kelly’s comparison to Okwara bodes well for Wardlow. Okwara is one of the better success stories when it comes to player development in recent memory. That distinction is not limited to Notre Dame. Okwara’s rise would stand out anywhere, considering he is now a viable contributor on an NFL defensive line.

It took a few years for Okwara to get ready for the collegiate game, though. He arrived unbelievably raw, largely due to his youth. (Okwara was younger than many players in the recruiting class a year behind him.) Wardlow arrives similarly unpolished, but more due to his short playing career to date.

Thus, patience may be required when it comes to Wardlow. Considering the development he showed between his first and second years of football, though, that patience should lead to reward. That high school development was enough to attract quick offers from a number of strong collegiate programs. Continuing at that rate would have Wardlow following Okwara exactly as Kelly hopes.


Aside from the five early enrollees, the numbers are not yet known for the Irish freshmen class. That is one of the admitted drawbacks to organizing this summer-long series numerically. But a little bit of educated guessing can garner estimates for those numbers, and those estimates can allow the series to proceed without pause.</em

How are those estimates crafted? The first step is to take a look at certain NCAA rules, but the NCAA does not put recommendations on defensive players, broadening Wardlow’s options. With Kelly comparing Wardlow to Romeo Okwara, slotting him in close to Okwara’s former number of 45 seemed fitting.

Kofi Wardlow very well may not wear No. 47, but it is possible.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92 (theoretically): Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 90 (theoretically): Cole Kmet, tight end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87 (theoretically): Jafar Armstrong, receiver
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84 (theoretically): Michael Young, receiver
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 73: (theoretically) Josh Lugg, offensive tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 65: (theoretically) Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center
No. 53: Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman
No. 52: (theoretically) Jonathan Doerer, kicker
No. 48: Greer Martini, inside linebacker

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 48 Greer Martini, inside linebacker

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-3 ½, 240 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Senior with only one season of eligibility remaining
Depth chart: Martini will start as an inside linebacker alongside classmate and fellow captain Nyles Morgan. Junior Te’von Coney provides plenty of motivation and support behind Martini.
Recruiting: Martini committed to Notre Dame following his sophomore year of high school, limiting the number of other offers he received. A rivals.com three-star prospect, Martini had already been offered by Maryland and North Carolina State when he made the decision he would not waver from.

CAREER TO DATE
Martini began contributing to the Irish defense from day one, making two tackles in his freshman season-opener against Rice in 2014. Since then, his season totals have risen from year-to-year, even though his starts have remained sporadic. Last season, for example, captain James Onwualu started ahead of Martini, and Coney saw plenty of action, as well, finishing with 62 tackles himself. Martini, meanwhile, made 55, including seven tackles for loss, the most for a returning member of the Notre Dame defense, just ahead of Morgan’s six.

Martini did undergo shoulder surgery last offseason, giving Onwualu and Coney more reps throughout 2016’s spring practice.

Martini has particularly excelled against option-attack offenses, most notably Navy’s. In each of the last three seasons, his season-high for single-game tackles came against the Midshipmen, nine in each of 2014 and 2015, and 11 last year.

2014: 13 games, two starts (Navy and USC), 26 tackles including two for loss and one sack v. Louisville.
2015: 13 games, four starts, 35 tackles including 2.5 for loss and one sack v. Stanford.
2016: 12 games, four starts, 55 tackles including seven for loss and three sacks, with two sacks coming v. Stanford.

QUOTE(S)
Healthy and presumably a clear-cut starter, Martini was not much of a topic this spring. In listing off positional battles halfway through spring practice, Irish coach Brian Kelly included Martini and Coney. Without reading too much into that, it should be a promising sign for Coney more than anything else.

WHAT KEITH ARNOLD PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
I’m not sure how he’ll do it, but I expect Martini to take the second-most snaps of any linebacker behind Nyles Morgan. The logic is fuzzy — senior James Onwualu will likely be the starting Sam linebacker — and the Irish staff believes in talented sophomore Te’von Coney. But there are just so many things that Martini is good at, and keeping him on the field makes too much sense.

“Productivity wise, I’m expecting a jump as well. We’ve seen Martini thrive against option opponents. Add in run-heavy opponents like Nevada, Michigan State and Army to the slate, and too many arrows point to opportunities for Martini. I expect him to seize them.”

2017 OUTLOOK
Martini has done all that has been asked of him on the field. With an even more prominent role in the defense this year, there is no reason not to expect such to continue. That should include another bump up in his tackle totals.

Four of the top-five Irish tacklers from a year ago return, with Martini being the fourth. He may not pass Morgan (94) or senior rover Drue Tranquill (79), but he could pass Coney. Even if Martini doesn’t do that, the combination of the two should join Morgan quite well in creating a consistent and productive inside linebacker tandem.

Having excelled against run-heavy opponents in the past, Martini will most likely post his biggest tackle totals against the likes of Georgia, Michigan State and Navy.

DOWN THE ROAD
Finishing his Notre Dame career with 200 or so tackles (currently at 116), Martini will have exceeded most expectations from four years ago. Continuing that trend will be difficult considering his size, but given his success defending against the run, a possible NFL minicamp invite could assuredly open the door toward a professional stint.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92 (theoretically): Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 90 (theoretically): Cole Kmet, tight end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87 (theoretically): Jafar Armstrong, receiver
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84 (theoretically): Michael Young, receiver
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 73: (theoretically) Josh Lugg, offensive tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 65: (theoretically) Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center
No. 53: Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman
No. 52: (theoretically) Jonathan Doerer, kicker

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 52 (theoretically) Jonathan Doerer, kicker

UND.com
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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-3, 188 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Incoming freshman with four years of eligibility remaining
Depth chart: Notre Dame has an established kicker in junior Justin Yoon, but Doerer could take over the kickoff duties for the Irish this fall.
Recruiting: Doerer switched his commitment from Maryland to Notre Dame only the weekend before National Signing Day.

QUOTE(S)
Irish coach Brian Kelly said Doerer’s abilities in kickoffs changed Notre Dame’s plans regarding pursuing a kicker this past recruiting cycle.

“We weren’t necessarily looking for one, but [Doerer] just jumped out at us,” Kelly said on National Signing Day. “Somebody with his numbers, his ability, his length, 6-foot-3, [an] extremely-gifted athlete. We were looking for somebody that could take over the kickoff duties for us right away.

“The strength that he has averaging 78-plus [yards] kicking the football with four-plus [seconds] hang time, just crazy numbers. It was just too good to pass up for us. He was a great fit for us. We went into that with really no expectations to go after a kicker until we saw him and fell in love with his ability.”

WHAT WE SAID WHEN DOERER’S NATIONAL LETTER OF INTENT ARRIVED
A late addition to this class, Doerer might find the field in 2017 amid injury speculation around incumbent kicker Justin Yoon. There was a time any special teams recruit brought much skepticism from the masses. That time has passed, and Doerer should not rekindle it.

“During today’s und.com programming, Irish coach Brian Kelly said he expects Doerer to take over the kickoff duties, if not more, due to his strong leg’s consistent ability to send the ball out of the end zone.”

2017 OUTLOOK
Expect Doerer to handle kickoffs from the outset and retain that duty until/unless it goes awry. Yoon’s injury concerns should be in the past by September, but allowing him to focus on placekicks could hold value for Notre Dame. Hence, Kelly welcomed the chance to fill a scholarship slot with Doerer.

Somewhere here, so about here, there should be mention of senior walk-on kicker Sam Kohler. Following the Blue-Gold Game, Kelly praised Kohler.

“Sam’s been solid,” Kelly said, echoing sentiments from special teams coordinator Brian Polian from earlier in the spring. “He really has. [I] like the way he prepares and works at it. We’ve got more competition coming in, so it will be a good situation. We’ll have a real good competition there.”

Will Kohler prevent Doerer from swinging his leg in games this fall? Most likely not, but Kohler could provide another option in the kicking game should it be needed.

DOWN THE ROAD
Yoon has two more years of eligibility, including 2017. If Doerer does indeed take over kickoff duties this fall, that will leave two years of separation between the two kickers. Come 2019, Doerer should be in prime position — and, with two years of work in a collegiate conditioning program, prime shape — to take over all three facets of the kicking game in point after attempts, field goals and kickoffs.

Senior punter Tyler Newsome also has two years of eligibility remaining, giving some time for both Doerer and the Irish coaches to consider if they want him to develop that skill, as well.


Aside from the five early enrollees, the numbers are not yet known for the incoming Irish freshmen. A little educated guessing can garner estimates for those numbers, and those estimates allow the proceedings to continue sans pause.

When it comes to a kicker, however, that educated guessing is rather akin to throwing darts in the dark. Doerer’s number could end up being nearly anywhere between 1 and 99, though it is also among the most unlikely to double up on another player’s digits. With that in mind, No. 52 seemed as good a placeholder as any.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92 (theoretically): Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 90 (theoretically): Cole Kmet, tight end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87 (theoretically): Jafar Armstrong, receiver
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84 (theoretically): Michael Young, receiver
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 73: (theoretically) Josh Lugg, offensive tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 65: (theoretically) Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center
No. 53: Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship