Skip to content

IBG: Burning the midnight oil

Oct 21, 2011, 4:41 AM EST

Rocket Pep Rally

Apologies for the late arrival of this week’s Irish Blogger Gathering. Boarding a United flight out of LAX to O’Hare, I was wondering if I was boarding an episode of Pan Am, as the plane they rolled out for us was from a long forgotten era, and of course… it didn’t have wifi.

So this week’s IBG — hosted by our barrister blogger Domer Law — was done with less than adequate online support. (That’s my disclaimer before you go judging my answers, too harshly.)

Beside: It’s USC week. Save your energy for Saturday night. Finally, just a day away.

Here. We. Go.

I’m taking an old friend of mine to the USC game.  They were born and raised in South Bend near Notre Dame, and developed a dislike for the University at a young age from dealing with the frustrations and messes that come from Notre Dame home football weekends.  She’s never been to a Notre Dame game before (she’s an Ohio State fan).  We’re going to go tailgate and do all the usual tailgating stuff.  Any suggestions on what I could do to help her let go of her animosity towards Notre Dame?

Don’t shove it down her throat. If she has a pulse and she enjoys college football, it won’t be hard to have a good time on Saturday. By and large, Notre Dame fans are a hospitable group, but it isn’t hard to have negative preconceived notions about the school and its alums, especially if you grew up in South Bend and struggled with the divide between the school and the city.

If your friend happens to be Catholic, check out the Grotto, the Basilica, and take a walk around God Quad. If your friend is a football fanatic, check out the changes they’ve made to the JACC, where the Heisman Trophies and past glories are now proudly on display. If they’re neither, make sure you have a good tailgate scene set up with good food and spirits and better company.

You’re not in the business of converting somebody. Leave that to Brian Kelly. Let the game and environment speak for itself. If she doesn’t like Notre Dame any better after Saturday, save your next USC ticket for someone else next time!

On a related note, do you have any suggestions for improving the Notre Dame game weekend experience generally?  Are there traditions lost that you’d like to see restored, or new ideas that you’d like to see implemented to improve the gameday experience?

Having been to about 20-25 different college football stadiums in my lifetime, I think Notre Dame does a pretty great job with Saturdays. After swinging the pendulum too far in response to tailgating behavior, I think the university has done a good job in making gameday whatever you want it to be: a history lesson, a day filled with pageantry, or a nice setting to enjoy a cold one and some Ralph’s Side Door Deli fried chicken.

A lot of people seem to be getting bent out of shape for the changing of the players walk, but if there’s one thing that I really miss, it’s the old pep rallies. Back in the Holtz era, they used to be more exciting than the games. Now they kind of just happen. Whether it’s staged in front of a dorm or outside in the new Irish Green, the closest it’s come to being even close to exciting was when Rocket Ismail was screaming about “Unbelief.”

Getting into the pep rally used to be tougher than getting into the football game. While excluding people that want to go doesn’t make that much sense, I’m all in favor of bringing the pep rally back inside, using that big new video board in the JACC  and some light tricks to get people fired up and add some electricity to an event that’s gotten pretty lame.

(You want proof? Here’s Rocket’s speech from 2009. Even the players didn’t know what to make of it, as they’d been used to mediocre gatherings where they wave to their moms and smile at girls from PW. But Rocket remembered what the pep rallies used to be like. If this were the old days, you’d have students running through walls. Charlie should’ve thrown a uniform on Rocket. It probably would’ve been the different.)

 

(a) USC is (and always will be) our biggest rival.  Do you agree or disagree with this statement?  And if you agree, why do you feel that this is such an important rivalry? (b) Rank your top 10 college football rivalries and provide justifications for each.

USC is Notre Dame’s biggest rival. No question. For all the reasons everybody else on the internet has talked about all week. Why is it important? Frankly, because it lets me use the word  “intersectional” in a sentence once a year. It also gives me the opportunity to talk Notre Dame football with all my neighbors in Manhattan Beach, where 90 percent of the population loves the Trojans.

I’m not great at coming up with lists without internet access, but off the top of my head, in no particular order here are my ten favorite college football rivalries:

Notre Dame vs. USC: Whether it’s in South Bend or South Central, it’s my favorite game to go to in the autumn.

Michigan vs. Michigan State: It feels really good not to have any allegiances in this one. Lately, it’s felt like watching The Great Outdoors, only this time Chet (John Candy) gets to sucker-punch Roman (Dan Aykroyd) in the face and laugh at him.

Oklahoma vs. Texas: The Red River Shootout is a true experience. The geographical excellence of the Cotton Bowl between Norman and Austin, plus seeing the stadium cut perfectly down the middle between burnt orange and sooner crimson is pretty awesome.

Georgia vs. Florida: Even if it isn’t called the World’s Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party anymore, I can tell you from experience that it still is. The football is usually okay, too.

Ole Miss vs. Mississippi State: This one gets on my list for the tailgating scene and the co-eds alone.

Michigan vs. Ohio State: The best of Big Ten football. When both programs are good, this game is awesome.

Auburn vs. Alabama: The best of SEC football. When both programs are good, the teams might be over the NFL salary cap.

Minnesota vs. Wisconsin: My hometown bias is certainly coming out, but these two teams play for the greatest rivalry trophy of all time. Celebrations like this vault it onto the list.

Harvard vs. Yale: If only because it lets me watch a brand of college football I was almost good enough to play. (Plus as a bonus, you can use the rosters to upgrade your LinkedIn profile.)

Oregon vs. Oregon State: Admittedly, I’m running out of steam here, but between the Civil War and the Apple Cup, the two Pacific Northwest rivalries deserve some credit.

Southern Cal is 5-1, with their only loss on the road at Arizona State.  They are unranked, sitting right behind us in the “also receiving votes” category.  How good is Southern Cal this year?  How do you see this game playing out?

We won’t know until after Saturday. For the first time in years, I’ve heard Notre Dame fans feeling outright brazen about this game, and possibly for good reason. USC is young and while they have some good talent on this roster, it’s a shell of what it was back in the Pete Carroll glory days.

That said, they probably have three first-rounders on their offense, and that’s as top heavy as any team Notre Dame will see this year. We’ve seen the Trojans give up a ton of points, look lost in pass coverage and really inconsistent on both sides of the ball.

That said, if you’re a Notre Dame fan and puffing your chest, Slow. Your. Roll. Like it or not, you’re one Ronald Johnson drop away from being in the midst of a really ugly losing streak.

If the Irish handle their business on Saturday, and I honestly think they should, there’ll be over a year to gloat to those Trojan fans you detest. But until then, keep quiet, save your vocal chords until Saturday night, and get ready to see what happens.

It appears that with a win over USC, we’ll re-enter the Top 25 rankings.  Now that we’re halfway through the season and have some actual evidence available to us from real games, how do you see the rest of the season playing out?  Predict:
For the record, I hate playing the predictions game. But since Domer Law is running this week’s IBG, I’m sure there’s some fine print at the bottom of his questions making me contractually obligated to participate. So here goes:
(a) Notre Dame’s final record: Let’s have fun. Run the table until Stanford. Then roll the dice and see what happens.
(b) Notre Dame’s bowl destination, opponent and outcome. Win out? BCS game. Lose one or two: Champ Sports Bowl.
(c) The BCS Championship game and result. Can they match two SEC teams up? I’m not buying Oklahoma yet.
(d) Notre Dame’s final AP ranking. If they win out? Top six. If not? Top 25.
(e) The winners of the major awards, including:
(i) Heisman Trophy Russell Wilson, just so some writer has to ask Tom O’Brien about the decision to let Wilson walk away from NC State for free.
(ii) Home Depot Coach of the Year Bret Bielema.
(iii) Davey O’Brien Award (best QB) Andrew Luck.
(iv) Doak Walker Award (best RB) LaMichael James.
(v) Fred Biletnikoff Award (best WR) Cretin-Derham Hall’s own Michael Floyd.
(vi) Chuck Bednarik Award (best defensive player) Whoever the SEC media decides.
  1. fredshaheen - Oct 21, 2011 at 8:08 AM

    Many readers will remember the pep rallies that were held in the Stepan Center and I believe that with the arrival of Lou Holtz they were moved to the Joyce Center. I can still remember the anticipation of the arrival of the band and the thrill as they entered the Stepan Center on a cold Autumn night. It was on occasion better than the game on Saturday afternoon! Today’s rallies quite honestly are a huge disappointment.

    • ndfanwabashman - Oct 21, 2011 at 2:15 PM

      Agreed the old Stepan Center pep rallies were the best. However, I’m pretty sure from a fire safety standpoint there was not a more un-safe environment for a pep rally in sports history. The Game Weekend experience is much too bland, corporate and family friendly to allow that anymore. Holtz actually had a few in the Stepan Center, they were moved to the Joyce when they became too big.

  2. dcirish - Oct 21, 2011 at 1:50 PM

    Yes the pep rallies are lame, but even if they were ok, nothing can compare to those in old Fieldhouse. First you were packed onto the dirt floor, and it was 90 degrees, even if was 10F outside. The Irish Guard gathered everyone up from the Halls and led them over. And with the team on the balcony above you and on occasion Pat O’Brien giving his win one for the Gipper speech live — well how can you compete with that in any other venue? Beat SC!

  3. ndirish86 - Oct 21, 2011 at 3:46 PM

    Keith – you are drinking the Trojan mythology kool aid with “Like it or not, you’re one Ronald Johnson drop away from being in the midst of a really ugly losing streak”. No we are absolutely not. We are one Ronald Johnson drop away from having only a minute and a half or so to score the last touchdown of the game and win. Would it have happened? Maybe, maybe not. But it’s not as if Johnson’s drop was with 0:01 on the clock or something. Last minute touchdowns happen in college football only, let’s see, every single week! As we all know, it happened twice in one game this year vs Michigan, so maybe USC could have scored again after we did… who knows. Let the Trojans whine that Johnson’s drop lost the game for them if it makes them feel better, but that myth does a disservice to the incredible defensive effort by ND and the fact that we just wanted it more (see: our entire OL pushing into the end zone on our last score). Did not expect you to buy into the whining…

  4. brendanunderscoreg - Oct 21, 2011 at 9:26 PM

    “Why is it important? Frankly, because it lets me use the word ‘intersectional’ in a sentence once a year.”

    I laughed at that one. So true.

  5. papadec - Oct 22, 2011 at 4:01 AM

    A top rivalry list is always a good way to start a discussion, or even a heated arguement. Keith really? Oregon vs Oregon State – instead of ARMY vs NAVY. Must be jet lag. I’m just shakin’ my head here. No doubt ND vs usc is #1. GO IRISH!!!!!!!!!!!!

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!