Under the lights: Tonight can help define Tommy Rees

11 Comments

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — When the Irish finally broke the eight-year hex the Trojans had cast over them, it wasn’t because of their freshman quarterback. In a season that saw Tommy Rees become one of the biggest surprises on the roster, on a rain-soaked night in Los Angeles, Rees threw three interceptions and nearly gave the game away to the Irish’s rival before scoring late to pull out a 20-16 victory.

“The USC game obviously wasn’t one of my better games,” Rees said this week.

The statement was delivered matter-of-factly. That the Irish won the game probably made him feel better, but it’s doubtful that anything the sophomore quarterback has seen in his first two seasons on campus have raised his pulse.

“He’s kind of a low-key guy,” wide receiver Michael Floyd said of his partner-in-crime.

But Rees’ emergence as Notre Dame’s starting quarterback has been anything but low-key. While he doesn’t fit the mold of an elite college quarterback, Rees’ performance tonight might finally force Irish fans to begrudgingly accept the sophomore’s ascension to his starting spot, even if his own depth chart is filled with players with better suited for Brian Kelly‘s spread offense.

***

When Brady Quinn walked onto campus at Notre Dame, he immediately looked the part of a starting quarterback. Golden boy looks, a sculpted physique, living through Quinn’s growing pains was made easier knowing that the raw material was there. Jimmy Clausen‘s arrival under the Golden Dome was even easier to stomach. Sure, the 2007 season was filled with more aches and pains than any before in the program’s history, but Clausen was the LeBron James of high school football, a wunderkind whose family hand-selected Charlie Weis as their personal quarterbacking guru. When Dayne Crist signed on the dotted line, Irish fans had all but believed they had struck gold for the third time. South Bend was becoming a boom town, with Crist’s athleticism, NFL-caliber size, and arm strength now being nurtured by Weis as Clausen starred under center.

Line up Quinn, Clausen and Crist and you’ve got three quarterbacks who look the part. Add Rees into that conversation and you half expect him to be asking the trio for an autograph.

“When you look at Tommy, you see the paperboy,” Kelly said. “He doesn’t necessarily strike you as an imposing figure.”

If you think comparing Rees to the two quarterback’s atop Notre Dame’s passing record books is unfair, size him up against the current depth chart. Crist will forever outshine Tommy getting off the bus. So will Andrew Hendrix, who gave more ammunition to those calling him the quarterback of the future with his escapades against Air Force. Freshman Everett Golson, who has only seen the field in the spring game, brings an athleticism to the position that even Hendrix can’t touch — he was set to play point guard and quarterback for North Carolina before he beat Butch Davis out of Chapel Hill. Even fifth-string quarterback turned wide receiver Luke Massa has a more complete skill-set for the position, though he’s now relegated to running routes, not reading them.

Tommy Rees may look better suited to throw a frisbee than a football. But as he approaches the tenth start of his career tonight, a win over USC and another steady performance by Rees should help Irish fans come to grips with a baffling conclusion: The kid is pretty good.

***

Pat Dillingham. Matt LoVecchio. Common names that come up from even educated Notre Dame fans when trying to put into perspective the early success Rees has had during his short time in South Bend. On first glance, maybe the comparisons work — heady, not-overly-athletic, white quarterbacks. But a quick look back shows how inappropriate those comparisons are.

Dillingham’s touchdown pass to Arnaz Battle to beat Michigan State will rightfully go down in Irish lore, but his career will not. The walk-on quarterback threw just that one touchdown pass against seven interceptions in his 87 career attempts.

LoVecchio’s career is a bit less cut and dry. After Gary Godsey floundered in the Irish’s loss to Michigan State in 2000, Notre Dame put the offense in LoVecchio’s hands, and he guided them to seven straight wins, including a victory over Carson Palmer and USC. The seven game run was amazing in that LoVecchio handled the football with extraordinary care, committing only one turnover (an interception against Navy) as he led the Irish to the Fiesta Bowl.

Of course, after that Fiesta Bowl things came crashing down. In a brutal mismatch, Oregon State plastered the Irish, and LoVecchio threw two interceptions, fumbled away another ball and finished just 13 of 33 for 138 yards while being sacked six times. The next season, LoVecchio struggled from the get go, gave way to Carlyle Holiday, and transferred to Indiana after the season. At no time did he every come close to playing to the level he did in those first seven games.

Comparing LoVecchio to Rees shows the obvious difference between Bob Davie and Brian Kelly’s offense. Outside of the bowl debacle, Davie only asked LoVecchio to throw the ball more than 20 times once, and while LoVecchio threw three touchdown passes against Air Force, he only completed 10 of 25 attempts. When Rees came in for an injured Dayne Crist, he never threw less than 20 times, with Rees having his highest completion percentages in the two games he attempted only twenty throws.

If you’re looking for the biggest difference between Rees and LoVecchio, you’ll find it in their second years. When asked to do more, LoVecchio struggled to play consistent football and lost a quarterbacking battle to a guy better suited for his head coach’s system. While Rees will never be able to do everything Kelly wants in his offense, the sophomore quarterback has only improved throughout the season, with his best work coming of late.

***

To borrow a phrase from the coach who originally recruited Rees, the arrow is pointing up for the sophomore.

“Since the final drive against Pitt, Tommy Rees has played at a completely different level,” Mike Mayock told me. “This is a game where he could make his statement.”

Rees’ numbers since that drive have been staggeringly efficient. He’s completed 56 of 81 throws for eight touchdowns. He’s thrown no interceptions and had no fumbles. Just crisp, efficient football, something the quarterback has seemed on the cusp of doing all season.

With that run, an unlikely character has started to emerge in the Irish record books:

  • Tommy Rees leads Notre Dame in career completion percentage.
  • Tommy Rees is fifth in school history in Efficiency Rating.
  • Tommy Rees’ 66% accuracy this season has only been bested by Clausen’s 68% in 2009.
  • Tommy Rees just broken into the school’s top ten in touchdown passes.
  • Tommy Rees is third in passing yards per game.
  • Tommy Rees has 11 straight games with a touchdown passes, the third longest streak in school history.

That unlikely character is doing all of this as a sophomore, at a time where no quarterback in his recruiting class is having anywhere near the success of the lightly touted Rees.

***

While the stats above are nice, Rees also has the chance to do something no Irish quarterback has done in 20 years. That’s beat USC in back to back games. The last time that happened, Rick Mirer leapt from the Notre Dame sidelines to the second overall pick in the NFL Draft.

We can feel safe saying that Rees’ collegiate career won’t end with him being taken at the top of the NFL Draft’s first round. At this point, we can also safely say that Rees’ career won’t fit into the mold of Dillingham or LoVecchio.

Under the lights against USC, we’ll get a better hint of where Rees’ road will lead him. The unlikely pilot of the Irish offense has a chance for a career-defining win in just his sophomore year. From there, he could end up near the top of the Irish record books or as a memorable footnote in the school’s rich history. While everyone’s in a hurry to figure it out, sometimes the truth takes some time to reveal itself.

Notre Dame’s opponents: Boston College

Getty Images
2 Comments

Notre Dame fans likely remember the last time the Irish visited Boston College’s campus. John Goodman caught a touchdown pass in the corner of the end zone to put Notre Dame up three possessions early in the third quarter, setting up the Irish to move past Alabama in the polls thanks to the Tide’s loss earlier that evening.

A week-three matchup will not provide such an opportunity for dramatics this season, but a loss would certainly diminish the trajectory of Notre Dame’s season.

2016 REVIEW
Boston College finished 7-6 last season and 2-6 in the ACC. That overall record was greatly aided by a three-game winning streak to close the season, including a 30-0 drubbing of Bob Diaco-led Connecticut, arguably sealing Diaco’s ouster at the end of the season. The Eagles also topped Wake Forest 17-14 before beating Maryland 36-30 in the Quick Lane Bowl, the program’s first bowl game victory since 2007.

Before that closing burst, Boston College not only lost games, it lost them by egregious margins. The Eagles faced three ranked foes last year, losing to Clemson, Louisville and Florida State by a combined score of 153-24, yet that does not even include their ugliest loss of the season, falling 49-0 at Virignia Tech in the season’s third week.

As was the case with Temple, taking a look at how Boston College’s offense fared against Wake Forest seems applicable, considering then-Deacons defensive coordinator Mike Elko now leads the Irish defense. None of the Eagles’ offensive numbers last season came close to stellar, but the overall performance against Wake Forest marks something of a nadir.

Ten of Boston College’s 17 points came on two drives totaling 32 yards, the short fields provided by an interception and a recovered fumble. Nonetheless, the 17 points fell short of the Eagles’ otherwise average of 20.7 points per game. Boston College rushed for 93 yards (on 39 attempts) and threw for 74 more (on 23 attempts), both drastically below the averages against all other opponents of 153.8 rushing yards and 149.6 passing yards. The Eagles typically managed 4.55 yards per play. Against Wake Forest, that figure fell to 2.69 yards.

All those single-game figures are significantly lower than what the Deacons usually allowed, with an emphasis on significantly.

WHAT BOSTON COLLEGE LOST

Former Boston College safety John Johnson rises for an interception. (Getty Images)

The Eagles lost notable pieces on all three levels of their defense, perhaps none more vital than safety John Johnson (a third-round NFL Draft pick). Johnson finished second on the team last year with 77 tackles and notched nine pass breakups, all while manning the role of defensive playcaller.

Matt Milano (a fifth-round NFL Draft pick) led the way for Boston College’s linebackers, finishing fourth on the team with 58 tackles while making 6.5 sacks. Rising junior Sharrieff Grice was expected to step in for Milano until he unexpectedly retired earlier this month citing medical concerns.

Furthermore, the Eagles lost two dominant defensive linemen in end Kevin Kavalec and tackle Truman Gutapfel, combining for 99 tackles, six sacks and 15 tackles for loss.

On the offensive side of the ball, one would usually note when a team loses its starting quarterback as Boston College did with Patrick Towles, a graduate transfer from Kentucky. Then again, in his one season in Chestnut Hill, Towles managed a 50.5 percent completion rate and threw 12 touchdowns against seven interceptions. His departure should not much further limit the offense.

WHAT BOSTON COLLEGE GAINED
Signing 21 recruits to the No. 66 class, per rivals.com, the Eagles may need a number of those to be immediate contributors. Two running backs stand at the head of the line in four-star AJ Dillon and three-star Travis Levy. While Boston College returns its top two rushers from 2016, it did lose Myles Willis, who finished with 301 yards on 49 carries. It seems rather likely either Dillon or Levy picks up that slack.

HEAD COACH
Steve Addazio enters his fifth season with the Eagles. Not much else needs to be said here, aside from the coach has long favored a physical style of play, focusing on a rushing attack as often as not.

Addazio was a Notre Dame assistant coach from 1999 to 2001.

OFFENSIVE SUMMARY
In a twist, Boston College may consider its offense its strength this season. That would seem to imply a leap from its averages of 20.4 points and 293 yards per game last season, but it is also a bit of an indictment of how the aforementioned losses could affect the upcoming “Defensive Summary.”

Jon Hillman led Eagle rushers last season with 542 yards and six touchdowns on 194 carries. (Getty Images)

The offensive line returns four starters, adding West Virginia graduate transfer Marcell Lazard to round off the unit. With two experienced running backs carrying the ball behind that line, the Eagles may be able to ease in whomever starts at quarterback. Senior Darius Wade and sophomore Anthony Brown continue to compete for that gig. A year ago, Towles’ transfer likely saved a year of Brown’s eligibility, while Wade finished the season 9-of-19 for 100 yards and one interception.

To be repetitive, though, either quarterback option will not need to clear a high bar to exceed Towles’ contributions. Add in a receiving corps returning its top-six options and perhaps Addazio will be tempted to stray from his power running game trademark.

That may not be the worst idea for Addazio. The offense has sputtered for two seasons now, averaging 17.2 points and 276 yards per game in 2015.

DEFENSIVE SUMMARY
Setting aside the team awaiting Addazio upon his arrival at Boston College in 2013, last year’s defense allowed the most points of his tenure, 25.0 per game. Frankly, that is a rather low total to include the descriptor of most in front of it, and that is a credit to Addazio as much as anyone else.

Continuing that trend will be only more difficult this season after losing Johnson, Milano, Grice, Kavalec and Gutapfel.

Somewhere it should be noted how strong of a pass rush Addazio has had in each of his seasons with the Eagles. Beginning in 2013, they have totaled 36, 33 and 34 sacks before topping out last season at 47.

SEASON OUTLOOK
Boston College will struggle to reach the win total over/under of 4. In order to get that to even a push, the Eagles may need to win their season finale at Syracuse. If they do cruise past that figure, it will likely trace to the defensive not losing a step AND the quarterback starter exceeding expectations.

Even if Boston College goes 4-8 this season, Addazio has a contract through 2020 and last year’s bowl game victory likely earned him a bit of a cushion.

Monday: Temple
Yesterday: Georgia
Tomorrow: Michigan State
Friday: Miami (OH)
Saturday: North Carolina
Sunday: Bye Week
Monday, the 21st: USC
Tuesday, 22nd: North Carolina State
Wednesday, 23rd: Wake Forest
Thursday, 24th: Miami (FL)
Friday, 25th: Navy
Saturday, 26th: Stanford (The same day as Stanford’s opener vs. Rice in Australia.)
Sunday, 27th: Six days until Notre Dame kicks off. You can make it that far, right?

Notre Dame’s Opponents: Georgia

Getty Images
30 Comments

Notre Dame’s season will get an early litmus test when the Irish host Georgia. Undoubtedly, plenty of commenters here will rush to say Notre Dame does not stand a chance against the Bulldogs’ rushing attack, and while that ground game does warrant a heap of respect, implying Georgia will cruise through South Bend on Sept. 9 is too simple of a summary.

2016 REVIEW
The Bulldogs went 8-5 last year, including 4-4 in the SEC. In nearly every respect, it was a disappointing debut season for head coach Kirby Smart given the expectations for what was supposedly a team ready to break through. Even that .500 conference record paints a prettier picture than the reality, as Georgia was outscored by 25 points in conference play.

The Bulldogs started 3-0, but that record was built on a house of cards. They needed to come from behind in the second half to win each of those games, including squeezing by Football Championship Subdivision-team Nicholls State 26-24.

Ole Miss handed Georgia its first loss in the form of a 45-14 walloping, leading 31-0 at halftime. There would be no second-half rally, to say the least. The defeat started a five-game stretch in which the Bulldogs fell four times, including a 17-16 loss at home against Vanderbilt. No matter how well Derek Mason may be doing with a slow Commodores rebuild, that was a bad look for Smart.

Few teams could have two prospective NFL starting running backs and a highly-touted quarterback, yet manage only 24.5 points per game.

WHAT GEORGIA LOST

Former Georgia receiver Isaiah McKenzie (Getty Images)

Remember discussing Temple and its three NFL Draft picks? That was three times as many as Georgia managed last season, that lone honoree being receiver Isaiah McKenzie in the fifth round. He totaled 633 yards and seven touchdowns last year, as well as a punt return for a touchdown.

More notably, the Bulldogs saw 60 percent of their offensive line graduate, and the remaining 40 percent does not make up one side of the line to create a reliable half of the field. (Think of Notre Dame’s offensive line and its trust in its left side with fifth-year senior left tackle Mike McGlinchey and senior left guard Quenton Nelson.)

Rather, Georgia is looking to replace both its offensive tackles as well as its center.

WHAT GEORGIA GAINED
Speaking of replacing offensive linemen, Georgia’s top 2017 recruit could fit the bill. Isaiah Wilson, all 6-foot-7 and 350 pounds of him, has reportedly seen some first-team action in preseason practice. He was the centerpiece of the No. 3 recruiting class in the country, per rivals.com. That rating was boosted by sheer numbers: Of the Bulldogs’ 26 signees, two were five-stars and 14 ranked as four-stars. Yes, that 26 figure exceeds the NCAA maximum, but that mandate kicks in only upon enrollment.

Receiver Mark Webb was among those four-stars and could quickly find himself playing time amid a deep but unproven receiver corps. (Sound familiar, Irish fans?)

HEAD COACH
Kirby Smart enters his second season away from Nick Saban’s watchful eye with one primary goal: Meet Saban in December. The former Alabama defensive coordinator will need to get past Florida to reach the SEC Championship game.

The encounter against Notre Dame could serve a genuine role in that task: Aside from last year’s loss in the World’s Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party, the Sept. 9 contest will be the truest test yet of Smart’s head-coaching tenure, partly due to it being on the road as it is. Suffice it to say, Georgia rarely travels north, let alone within range of the Great Lakes’ winds. Obviously, the weather should not matter in early September, but it is not absurd to think the time in flight could alter some routines.

As will be discussed below in the “Season Outlook,” the Bulldogs will need to win on the road this season if they have hopes of reclaiming some SEC glory. Notching an away victory in the season’s second week could lay a foundation for that pursuit.

OFFENSIVE SUMMARY

Georgia running back Sony Michel (Getty Images)

The entire week leading into Georgia facing the Irish, expect to hear repeated mentions of senior running backs Nick Chubb and Sony Michel (pronounced like Michelle). It is hard to overstate how good each is. To have both defies typical collegiate comprehension.

Yet, the Bulldogs attack will go beyond the rushing game. Sophomore quarterback Jacob Eason has arm strength to rival Notre Dame junior quarterback Brandon Wimbush’s, and Eason will have a number of receivers to target, ones he is certainly more familiar with than he was as a freshman.

DEFENSIVE SUMMARY
Georgia returns its top-five tacklers. Eh, maybe that is not as impressive as it first seems.

Georgia returns 14 of its top-15 tacklers, losing only No. 6 in that count, cornerback Maurice Smith and his 50 takedowns.

With 10 returning starters, including its entire front-seven, having now spent an additional year learning Smart’s 3-4 system, this should be a dominant defense led by linebackers Davin Bellamy and Lorezno Carter. The duo combined for 10 sacks and 30 quarterback hurries last year. No matter how generously that latter statistic is tracked, Bellamy’s 17 hurries is a number to notice.

SEASON OUTLOOK
Vegas pegs Georgia’s win total over/under at 8.5. Despite the heralded running duo and threatening defense, that number is quite well-placed. Given their struggles a year ago, putting too much faith in the Bulldogs may be a reach. In order to best that win total, they would need to not slip up in any game likely favored in (such as at Vanderbilt), as well as win at least two of five games away from home at Notre Dame, at Tennessee, at a neutral site vs. Florida, at Auburn and at Georgia Tech.

The SEC East will presumably come down to Georgia and Florida again. Speaking of the Gators, do not be surprised to see semi-frequent Florida updates in this space this fall. The Malik Zaire experiment’s intrigue increases with each update from Gainesville.

Yesterday: Temple
Tomorrow: Boston College
Thursday: Michigan State
Friday: Miami (OH)
Saturday: North Carolina
Sunday: Bye Week
Monday, the 21st: USC
Tuesday, 22nd: North Carolina State
Wednesday, 23rd: Wake Forest
Thursday, 24th: Miami (FL)
Friday, 25th: Navy
Saturday, 26th: Stanford (The same day as Stanford’s opener vs. Rice in Australia.)
Sunday, 27th: Enjoy the sun once more before the season commences in earnest.

Tirico replaces Hicks in Notre Dame booth

Getty Images
33 Comments

Let the changes keep coming. In an offseason filled with three new coordinators and the conclusion of a $400-million construction project including a video board towering over the south end zone, Notre Dame fans will need to adjust to another departure from the Irish norm, though this one is far-from consequential when it comes to how the team plays.

Mike Tirico will replace Dan Hicks as the play-by-play man for Notre Dame games in 2017, NBC Sports announced Monday morning. Tirico joined NBC just more than a year ago and called three Irish games in 2016 while Hicks tended to golf broadcast duties.

“Mike has been an elite play-by-play voice in both professional and collegiate football for more than a decade,” said Sam Flood, executive producer and president of production at NBC Sports. “He is the latest in a line of distinguished broadcasters to call Notre Dame Football on NBC. … We look forward to hearing Mike call the first-ever game at the newly-renovated Notre Dame Stadium.” (more…)

Notre Dame’s Opponents: Temple

Getty Images
9 Comments

There are exactly two weeks remaining until a Monday arrives with a Notre Dame game awaiting on the other end of the work week. For the second time in five years, the Irish will open against Temple. In 2013, the Owls were entering their first season under a first-time head coach after their previous leader left for a Power Five school beginning with the letter ‘B.’

Admittedly, specifying that Boston College and Baylor open with the same letter of the alphabet may be a reach, but in doing so, everything about that 2013 sentence will hold true for Temple again in 2017.

2016 REVIEW
The Owls went 10-4 last season, including losses to both Memphis and Wake Forest. The season’s highlight came when Temple beat then-No. 20 Navy 34-10 in the American Athletic Conference title game.

Those losses to Memphis and Wake Forest warrant extra notice for Irish fans this season—Memphis’ offensive coordinator Chip Long now holds that role at Notre Dame and the same can be said for Wake Forest’s defensive coordinator Mike Elko.

Long and the Tigers stretched the Owls’ defense further than it did throughout the rest of the season, though Temple still held Memphis to much less than its usual output. Against the Owls, the Tigers managed 34 points, though 14 of those came off a defensive score and a special teams touchdown, lowering the actual offensive production to only 20 points. Temple allowed 17.2 points per game in its 13 other contests, while Memphis averaged 39.25 points per game otherwise.

The Tigers rushed for 149 yards, less than their average across the rest of the year of 160.2 rushing yards, but also more than the Owls’ usual allowance of 129.9 yards. Memphis threw for 174 yards, far short of its usual 315.3, yet more than Temple’s 150.5 average. The Tigers gained an average of 5.6 yards per play, closer to its usual 6.3 yards than the Owls’ standard of 4.6 yards allowed per play.

Against Wake Forest, a quick look at the stats becomes quickly skewed. Temple trailed 31-7 in the second quarter, thus taking to the air, and doing so somewhat successfully, finally succumbing to a final score of 34-26. The Deacons held the Owls to -20 rushing yards on 23 attempts while giving up 396 passing yards and 5.2 yards per play. If removing the bowl game from Temple’s season, the Owls averaged 32.8 points, 191.2 rushing yards, 225.2 passing yards and 6.0 yards per play. Wake Forest allowed an average of 21.8 points, 155.9 rushing yards, 214.2 passing yards and 5.3 yards per play.

WHAT TEMPLE LOST
To start with, Temple lost Rhule. Back-to-back 10-4 seasons put him in position to move on to a bigger gig, and considering the amount of talent leaving the program at the same time, it would appear Rhule made the smart move.

The NFL drafted three Owls, including defensive end Hasson Reddick as the No. 13 overall pick to the Arizona Cardinals and left tackle Dion Dawkins with the No. 63 overall pick courtesy of the Buffalo Bills. Perhaps more notably at the collegiate level, quarterback Phillip Walker was one of six undrafted free agents to sign with NFL teams.

A four-year starter, Walker set the career passing mark at Temple with 10,669 yards. He was only 121 yards away from setting the record in only three seasons before adding 3295 yards in 2016. Joining him among those undrafted free agents, running back Jahad Thomas ran for 953 yards and 14 touchdowns last year.

The Owls also lost what seems to be their entire linebacker corps, returning only one of their top-six tacklers.

WHAT TEMPLE GAINED
This category is meant to be about recruiting. So as not to reduce the following “HEAD COACH” section as entirely unnecessary, the incoming coach will be mentioned there. Among recruits, Temple signed a total of 16 players in the class of 2017, including three prospects rated as three-stars by rivals.com. Of those three, linebacker Malik Burns and quarterback Todd Centeio could conceivably see notable playing time this season.

HEAD COACH
Geoff Collins takes over the program fresh from spending six seasons as a defensive coordinator in the SEC, the two most-recent at Florida. There may not be much else to know about Collins until he leads a program. He has spent his entire career on the defensive side of the ball, including four years playing linebacker at Western Carolina.

OFFENSIVE SUMMARY

Temple junior running back Ryquell Armstead Getty Images)

Collins tapped a former Fordham colleague to lead the Owls offense, pulling Dave Patenaude from the offensive coordinator role at Coastal Carolina, a Football Championship Series program. While with the Chanticleers, it is hard to underscore how dynamic Patenaude’s offense was, including a 2015 season in which it averaged 37.3 points per game while churning through six different quarterbacks.

At Temple, Patenaude will obviously need to adjust to an inexperienced quarterback. A starter has yet to be named, and it appears there is a non-zero chance Centeio earns the nod. Whoever takes the first snap will have the luxury of turning to a tested running back in junior Ryquell Armstead. Though he was not the starter, Armstead still took 156 carries for 919 yards and 14 touchdowns last year.

For that matter, the quarterback will have Walker’s top-four receivers available to target, led by senior Keith Kirkwood and junior Ventell Bryant.

DEFENSIVE SUMMARY
Formerly the defensive backs coach at Purdue, defensive coordinator Taver Johnson is expected to keep Temple’s 4-3 defense intact. Doing so should allow him to rely on a strong secondary, perhaps the Owls’ most-reliable defensive asset. Senior free safety Sean Chandler, 6-foot and 190 pounds, and junior strong safety Delvon Randall, 5-foot-11 and 208 pounds, lead the way along the back-line.

SEASON OUTLOOK
Rhule left for one of the most-challenging job openings in recent years. He did so in part because his profile would never be higher than it was following Temple’s 2016 season. This year certainly does not have the makings of another 10-4 campaign. The over/under on Owl wins this year is a middling 6.5, and Notre Dame currently stands as a 15-point favorite for the Sept. 2 season opener.

In 19 days, Irish fans should take particular notice of what Temple players wear Nos. 6, 7 and 8. The Owls have a relatively-young tradition of bestowing single-digit numbers upon players deemed “Temple Tuff” by their teammates. Of the names mentioned above, Kirkwood, Bryant, Chandler and Randall all wear single digits and will be expected to contribute heavily. Nos. 6-8 are unclaimed at the moment.

Tomorrow: Georgia
Wednesday: Boston College
Thursday: Michigan State
Friday: Miami (OH)
Saturday: North Carolina
Sunday: Bye Week (Nice how that works out, isn’t it? Almost like it was planned.)
Monday, the 21st: USC
Tuesday, 22nd: North Carolina State
Wednesday, 23rd: Wake Forest
Thursday, 24th: Miami (FL)
Friday, 25th: Navy
Saturday, 26th: Stanford (The same day as Stanford’s opener vs. Rice in Australia.)
Sunday, 27th: One last breath before the season truly begins.