Charlie-Weis

Weis to Kansas, Crist to follow?

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It’s not like you couldn’t see it coming. Yesterday’s bombshell news that Charlie Weis was leaving his post as the offensive coordinator at Florida to take over the Kansas football program led to me openly hypothesizing about quarterback Dayne Crist joining him in Lawrence. (I even tweeted it 18 hours ago.) Well, just minutes ago Pete Thamel of the New York Times reported that Crist will leave tomorrow for an official visit to Kansas, where he’ll consider reuniting with the coach that brought him to Notre Dame.

The ties to the Kansas quarterbacking job and Notre Dame are all too unique. For Crist, rejoining Weis could lead to the renaissance he’ll need to resurrect any professional aspirations he had. It’ll also put him back in a pro-style offense that’ll fit the fifth-year senior’s skillset, playing in a system he spent two years learning. But before he makes the decision to head to the Jayhawks, he’d be well served to discuss the move with one of his current coaches, offensive line coach Ed Warinner. It was Warinner that led the charge recruiting current Jayhawk starting quarterback Jordan Webb. (Warinner will also likely know just about all of the veteran offensive personnel for the Jayhawks, giving Crist an idea of just what he’ll be walking into.) If Crist is going to play at Kansas, he’ll need to beat out a quarterback that started all 12 games this season and seven during his redshirt freshman season. At six-foot, 195-pound, Webb doesn’t profile as a prototype Charlie Weis quarterback, but he’s got a lot of experience and is one of the team’s leaders.

Even before a coaching change was in the works, competition at the quarterback position was a given. Then offensive coordinator Chuck Long told the Kansas City Star that spring practice would be dedicated to building depth, with redshirt freshman Michael Cummings, entering the fray and two high school commitments, Seth Russell and Bilal Marshall committed to the Jayhawks. Russell is a lanky 6-foot-4 Texas product with an offer to Wake Forest his only other BCS option, while Marshall looks a little bit more impressive, with the dual-threat Florida prospect sporting a handful of impressive offers including Georgia Tech, Virginia, Northwestern, Baylor and Boston College among others. Weis honored the commitments of Ty Willingham’s recruits when he took over at Notre Dame, so you’d expect him to do the same at Kansas, especially this late in the recruiting game.

Of course, bringing in Crist could also lead Weis down the wrong path. One of the pitfalls Weis ran into at Notre Dame was failing to develop depth in his first two seasons in South Bend, and bringing in a one-year quarterback like Crist could be more of the same for the former Irish coach. Turner Gill only won one game in the Big 12 in his two seasons at Kansas, so the “win now” attitude that was needed in South Bend doesn’t likely apply to the demands of Jayhawk football fans. (They leave that to Bill Self’s basketball team.) Does a stop-gap quarterback send the right message to a team that likely needs to be rebuilt from the ground up? His second time around, will Charlie learn from mistakes he made at Notre Dame and develop the youth on a roster that’ll likely need to be fully restocked?

On a day when the Irish lost their offensive coordinator to UMass, the college football world was abuzz with Weis’ sudden departure from Florida, where he was the highest paid offensive coordinator in the country and had his son working in the football program. Say what you want about Weis — and yesterday, far too many media members resurrected tired pot shots and half-decade old grudges — but the man can develop quarterbacks and run an offensive (even if Florida fans didn’t see it in his only season in Gainesville).

If Crist does decide to head to Kansas to finish his career, it’ll be a walk down memory lane for Irish fans. It’ll be bizarre seeing Weis and Crist wearing Jayhawk blue and red, but it’ll also be fun to see Dayne finally get the chance to play in the offense he was recruited to run.

Irish A-to-Z: Javon McKinley

Javon McKinleyRIVALS
Rivals / Yahoo Sports
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If it’s possible to fly under the radar as an elite incoming recruit, Javon McKinley is doing it. One of California’s most prolific receivers in history—putting up monster numbers in one of the state’s most competitive conferences—McKinley now steps onto campus at Notre Dame with a depth chart filled with uncertainty.

McKinley’s big, strong and polished. That’s usually a good thing for a young skill player. While freshmen have come along slowly under Brian Kelly at receiver, the head coach has a trio of freshman newcomers who will test that theory immediately.

 

JAVON MCKINLEY
6’3″, 205 lbs.
Freshman, WR

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A consensus 4-star recruit, McKinley was a U.S. Army All-American, a multi-season selection on the LA Times’ All-Area first-team, the 2014 All-Area Back of the Year, and 2014 Southern Section 5 Player of the Year.

He had offers from USC, UCLA, Oregon, Stanford, Arizona State, and Ohio State before picking Notre Dame.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Until we see him, let’s just call McKinley’s potential incredibly intriguing. I made the physical comparison around Signing Day to Michael Floyd, and that might be setting McKinley up for failure. (Especially with people knowing how I feel about MMF as a player.) But as a ready-made physical specimen, McKinley can do just about everything, and we’ve already seen him do it against high end high school competition.

That said, dominating at the high school level with his size is different than understanding how to do that in the college game. And we’ll need to see just how good McKinley’s speed is—Floyd ended up being Notre Dame’s most prolific receiver in history because of his physicality and because he had sneaky-good speed that allowed him to run behind defensive backs.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I think McKinley’s too good to keep off the field. But I also think his freshman ceiling will be in line with the better of Brian Kelly’s young receivers, so I’m still going to put a cap on his season totals around 15-20 catches. (True freshman TJ Jones had 23 grabs, when Notre Dame’s receiving depth chart was essentially empty.)

What does that mean for the future? Nothing. We saw Will Fuller go from zero-to-sixty when he went from freshman to sophomore season. We saw Kelly feed the football to Michael Floyd when his offense needed it. Kelly will do what the offense needs to score points.

If McKinley were the early enrollee, I think all of us would’ve been buzzing about him instead of Stepherson. And those 15 practices might be enough to give Stepherson the nod over McKinley, though the latter is far more game-ready from a physicality standpoint.

Regardless, Notre Dame’s young receivers—Stepherson, McKinley and Chase Claypool—might be the most exciting incoming class at a position that I’ve seen in my time covering the Irish. so while it’s still too early to say it, McKinley could be the best of the bunch.

 

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg
Jalen Elliott
Nicco Feritta
Tarean Folston
Mark Harrell
Daelin Hayes
Jay Hayes
Tristen Hoge
Corey Holmes
Torii Hunter Jr.
Alizé Jones
Jamir Jones
Jarron Jones
Jonathan Jones
Tony Jones Jr.
Khalid Kareem
DeShone Kizer
Julian Love
Tyler Luatua
Cole Luke
Greer Martini
Jacob Matuska
Mike McGlinchey
Colin McGovern
Deon McIntosh

 

Irish A-to-Z: Deon McIntosh

Deon McIntosh
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As part of Notre Dame’s two running back recruiting haul, freshman Deon McIntosh arrives on campus with a skill-set fairly unique to the runners in Autry Denson’s backfield. A prolific junior in Florida football hotbed Broward County, McIntosh is the closest thing to a scatback Brian Kelly has recruited.

Dubbed the “lightning” to classmate Tony Jones’s “thunder,” now McIntosh needs to find a role in the Irish offense, capable of playing in the slot or being utilized on special teams. While we won’t see what the Irish have in McIntosh until he’s given a shot to compete with Tarean Folston, Josh Adams and a very talented position group, McIntosh is another skill player brought in by this coaching staff with zero intention of waiting his turn.

 

DEON MCINTOSH
5’11”, 180 lbs.
Freshman, RB

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A three-star recruit, McIntosh was the second all-time leading scorer at Cardinal Gibbons. He was ranked the No. 18 player in Broward County by the Miami Herald and had offers from Miami, Tennessee, North Carolina, and West Virginia.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

A 180-pound running back needs to do a few things that are extraordinary to survive at that size and we’ll find out if that’s what McIntosh can do when we finally see him in action at the college level. But until then, you can probably put his ceiling somewhere below elite, unless the Irish have pulled in another hidden gem.

Versatility will also be key for McIntosh. If he’s able to play in the slot, there’s less of a backup there than behind a very competitive three-deep at running back.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I’m struggling to find a way for McIntosh to see the field this season unless he turns some heads during fall camp. Finding carries for Dexter Williams is hard enough. How someone behind Williams, Folston and Adams gets touches is beyond me.

That said, McIntosh’s time at Notre Dame will be defined by his patience and what he does when he finally gets a chance. Pulling talented football players out of Fort Lauderdale isn’t easy. Neither is keeping them in South Bend if they aren’t seeing the field.

Denson raved about McIntosh’s game on and off the field during Signing Day festivities. We’ll see how the young coach’s first crop of backs perform once they’re on campus.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg
Jalen Elliott
Nicco Feritta
Tarean Folston
Mark Harrell
Daelin Hayes
Jay Hayes
Tristen Hoge
Corey Holmes
Torii Hunter Jr.
Alizé Jones
Jamir Jones
Jarron Jones
Jonathan Jones
Tony Jones Jr.
Khalid Kareem
DeShone Kizer
Julian Love
Tyler Luatua
Cole Luke
Greer Martini
Jacob Matuska
Mike McGlinchey
Colin McGovern

2018 LB Ovie Oghoufo commits to Notre Dame

Oghoufo Rivals
Rivals / Yahoo Sports
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Notre Dame’s recruiting momentum continues to build as linebacker Ovie Oghoufo is the latest commitment to the Irish program. An incredible fifth member of the 2018 class, Oghoufo made the news official on Friday, picking the Irish over Michigan, Michigan State, Boston College, Kentucky and a handful of other early offers.

The Farmington, Michigan native made the news official via Twitter and also spoke with Irish247’s Tom Loy about the decision. Oghoufo was offered earlier in the summer and was on campus again this week.

 

Give current freshman Khalid Kareem an assist for landing the 6-foot-3, 210-pound linebacker, who spent his visit in South Bend hearing from the fellow Michigander about the virtues of attending Notre Dame.

Irish247’s Tom Loy has the scoop.

“He’s practically my brother,” Oghoufo told Irish 247 of his relationship with Kareem. “I spent basically the whole day with him when I went up there for camp. We reunited. It was a great time with him. When we talked, he told me that if I go to Notre Dame, it’s a 40-year decision, not just a four-year decision. He says the caches are the best and the opportunities are great.”

That Oghoufo worked out for coaches says quite a bit about the early offer and commitment. This is a linebacker who hasn’t played his junior season of high school football yet, but was incredibly productive as a sophomore at Harrison High School.

Oghoufo joins quarterback Phil Jurkovec, running back Markese Stepp, and front seven defenders Jayson and Justin Ademilola in the 2018 class.

 

 

Irish A-to-Z: Colin McGovern

Colin McGovern 247
Irish247
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Senior lineman Colin McGovern provides the type of experience that’ll come in handy on an offensive line that some believe is the finest in college football, but still has some depth concerns. McGovern’s versatility—he’s in the conversation at right guard while likely providing depth behind Alex Bars at right tackle—is something we’ve seen in flashes since the Illinois native first came to campus. But finding a path to the field has been difficult, especially as poorly timed injuries struck.

Injuries or not, McGovern’s personnel battles made winning any job a herculean task. With Zack Martin, Ronnie Stanley and now Mike McGlinchey all profiling to be first round tackles, a shift inside was probably the most prudent to seeing playing time. Now as a fourth-year veteran preparing for his third season of eligibility, McGovern will enter fall camp hoping to win a starting guard job, but ready to fill in where needed.

 

COLIN MCGOVERN
6’4.5″, 315 lbs.
Senior, No. 62, OL

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

McGovern picked Notre Dame over offers from Alabama, Ohio State, Michigan, Nebraska, and a ton of other elite programs, a national recruit from the Chicago suburbs. He was better liked by some recruiting services than others, and his position was somewhat a question mark, too. Listed as a tackle, Notre Dame saw him as a guard prospect.

 

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2013): Did not see action.

Sophomore Season (2014): Played in two games as a reserve guard, seeing action against both Rice and Michigan.

Junior Season (2015): Made eight appearances, playing mostly on special teams. Played 16 snaps at right guard against UMass.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

Notre Dame’s tackles stayed upright last season and when Quenton Nelson went down it was Alex Bars who filled in.

Right now, the weak spot on Notre Dame’s offensive line is the depth at tackle and center. I’m not convinced that Hunter Bivin is the best option if someone goes down on the outside, and that’s a place where McGovern might be able to thrive.

Brian Kelly went out of his way to discuss McGovern this spring, praising both his size and ability, and talking about his opportunity to cross-train across the guard and tackle depth chart.

It’ll likely take someone going down for McGovern to get his chance, but if he has a strong camp, I get the feeling that he and Alex Bars will ascend to the key backups at tackle, while McGovern could also make a case for being a candidate to be sixth-or-seventh man.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

The road to the field seems very limited for McGovern if he can’t win the right guard job. That’ll likely come into focus in August, especially after the staff gets a look at Tommy Kraemer and the progress made by fellow candidates Hunter Bivin and Tristen Hoge.

McGovern has the feet and athleticism to survive at tackle, something that’ll keep him in the mix behind Alex Bars. A fifth year is likely if he’s able to provide some stability on the edge, knowing that McGlinchey isn’t likely coming back for a fifth year if he’s as good as we all think he is.

That’s not flashy upside. But serving as an understudy on one of the best offensive lines in the country is no small feat.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I’ve always thought McGovern was a solid football player, but he just hasn’t been able to break through. Last spring’s concussion really seemed to set him back in a position battle that seemed up for grabs—we’ll see if that’s still the case entering fall camp.

A veteran without much experience is likely going to take over for Steve Elmer. It’s just tough to say it’ll be McGovern, when it looked like Hunter Bivin had emerged at the end of spring practice. McGovern’s experience and versatility will be where his value is established.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg
Jalen Elliott
Nicco Feritta
Tarean Folston
Mark Harrell
Daelin Hayes
Jay Hayes
Tristen Hoge
Corey Holmes
Torii Hunter Jr.
Alizé Jones
Jamir Jones
Jarron Jones
Jonathan Jones
Tony Jones Jr.
Khalid Kareem
DeShone Kizer
Julian Love
Tyler Luatua
Cole Luke
Greer Martini
Jacob Matuska
Mike McGlinchey