Greenberry Houston

The ones that got away


Brian Kelly wanted to keep the focus on the players that decided to sign letters-of-intent with the Irish. And with a recruiting class compiled of 16 talented players — a lean class no doubt, but far from a program killer — that sentiment is certainly understandable.

But we’ll have four years to judge the talent coming in the door. Let’s take one last look at the one’s that got away:

DEONTAY GREENBERRY: From Notre Dame to Houston

How bad was it? Greenberry’s departure was one of the more shocking turns in recent Irish recruiting history, ranking up their with Lorenzo Booker picking the wrong hat and quarterback C.J. Leak leaving Bob Davie at the altar. Of course, both those losses seemed much worse at the time than during their playing careers with Leak flaming out and Booker never being able to carry the load of an every down back. Still, Greenberry’s shocking decision went viral on the internet, and the hundreds of comments that flooded into the live blog at least reflect the perceived importance of landing Mr. Football in California for the Irish, especially at a position of need.

Impact on the field? Greenberry seemed like the most likely to replace Michael Floyd, and he certainly has the jump ball skills to do so. That said, the fade route and 50/50 passing game that Charlie Weis employed with guys like Floyd and Jeff Samardzija left when Kelly came to town, and any receiver playing in the current offense needs route running precision to get on the field.

In his own words: “I was going to Notre Dame for the wrong reason,” Shepard told the Fresno Bee. “Tee had committed to Notre Dame, and I wanted to be where he was at. Then I started sitting down and really thinking what’s best for me, where I would feel most comfortable. I’ve talked with him, and he’s good with it.”

Final Assessment: This one certainly hurt. Any time you’ve got a recruit wrapped up until the morning of Signing Day, only to lose him to the seventh or eighth most impressive college football program in the state of Texas, well — that’s a head scratcher. Of course, Greenberry could make an instant impact like a Sammy Watkins or disappear like Kyle Prater or Markeith Ambles, just two of many recent five-star wide receivers that didn’t live up to the hype. Not to wish it on Greenberry, but that’s just the nature of recruiting.

RONALD DARBY: From Notre Dame to Florida State

How bad was it? Irish fans were salivating over the idea of Darby and Tee Shepard joining forces and given the Irish two potential lockdown cornerbacks in a recruiting class that needed to upgrade the secondary. Darby was always the number one flight risk in this recruiting class, and his decommitment — while predictable — didn’t hurt any less just because people saw it coming. Still, Irish fans had to almost expect this with Florida State, who I’m sure didn’t pull any punches after last year’s snatch-back of Aaron Lynch.

Impact on the field? Darby had one unquestionable five-star component: Speed. How well he develops as a cornerback and football player, we’ll have to see. Still, there’s no doubting he’d have immediately challenged for playing time at cornerback, where just about everyone is unproven, and his speed could’ve quickly found its way into the return game alongside George Atkinson.

In his own words: “I liked the home feeling at Clemson, I liked the home feeling at Auburn and I liked the home feeling at Florida State, but I had to look past the red carpet treatment and look at the program that could better me as a person,” Darby told the Washington Post. “The difference was the young talent they have going and the need for DBs. They played a safety at cornerback in the Champs Bowl.”

Final Assessment: Fans and recruitniks have pointed to a rift between Darby and the Irish coaching staff over some perceived change in Darby’s recruitment. Area recruiter Charley Molnar’s departure and the coaching staff transition likely hurt Notre Dame, but anything Kerry Cooks did or didn’t do isn’t what sent Darby looking elsewhere. Notre Dame tried multiple times to get in the door with Darby in recruiting’s final weeks, but they were never even let in the house. Casting that aside, you begin to forget that other schools have depth chart problems, too. Florida State obviously sold theirs, not to mention an ACC track program, and enacted a modicum of revenge for the loss of Aaron Lynch.

TAYLOR DECKER: From Notre Dame to Ohio State

How bad was it? The writing was on the wall when Urban Meyer offered Decker a scholarship, then proceeded to bring in Irish coaches Tim Hinton and Ed Warinner, Decker’s area recruiter and position coach respectively. Decker was one of two offensive tackles in a three-man offensive line class, and the six-foot-eight, 320-pound prospect certainly looked the part of a blue-chipper. That it took Meyer only a few weeks to undo a commitment that had been one of Notre Dame’s longest gives you a glimpse into how things are going to go in the Midwest now that Ohio State is being run by one of the sports most ruthless recruiters.

Impact on the field? Probably not all that large actually. The Irish actually have their depth chart at offensive tackle pretty solidified and already have one of the nation’s best 2013 prospects committed in Steve Elmer. That said, bringing in only two offensive linemen in the class means that Notre Dame can’t afford to miss next year.

In his own words: “It’s always been a dream of mine,” Decker told the Dayton Daily News. “I’ve grown up an Ohio State fan; I grew up in Ohio an hour from Columbus, an hour from Ohio State. That’s what I’ve always known as far as college football. Especially when I was younger, that was everything. It’s definitely a great feeling and I’m excited for it.”

Final Assessment: If you believe what some have reported, Kelly didn’t waste too much time crying over Decker’s departure. I’m not sure that’s 100 percent true, but of all the guys the Irish loss, this one certainly should sting the least.

Irish add commitment from CB Donte Vaughn

Donte Vaughn

Notre Dame’s recruiting class grew on Monday. And in adding 6-foot-3 Memphis cornerback Donte Vaughn, it grew considerably.

The Irish added another jumbo-sized skill player in Vaughn, beating out a slew of SEC offers for the intriguing cover man. Vaughn picked Notre Dame over offers from Auburn, LSU, Miami, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, Tennessee and Texas A&M among others.

He made the announcement on Monday, his 18th birthday:

It remains to be seen if Vaughn can run like a true cornerback. But his length certainly gives him a skill-set that doesn’t currently exist on the Notre Dame roster.

Interestingly enough, Vaughn’s commitment comes a cycle after Brian VanGorder made news by going after out-of-profile coverman Shaun Crawford, immediately offering the 5-foot-9 cornerback after taking over for Bob Diaco, who passed because of Crawford’s size. An ACL injury cut short Crawford’s freshman season before it got started, but not before Crawford already proved he’ll be a valuable piece of the Irish secondary for years to come.

Vaughn is another freaky athlete in a class that already features British Columbia’s Chase Claypool. With a safety depth chart that’s likely turning over quite a bit in the next two seasons, Vaughn can clearly shift over if that’s needed, though Notre Dame adding length like Vaughn clearly points to some of the shifting trends after Richard Sherman went from an average wide receiver to one of the best cornerbacks in football, and Vaughn will be asked to play on the outside.

Vaughn is the 15th member of Notre Dame’s 2016 signing class. He is the fifth defensive back, joining safeties D.J. Morgan, Jalen Elliott and Spencer Perry along with cornerback Julian Love. The Irish project to take one more.

With Notre Dame expecting another huge recruiting weekend with USC coming to town, it’ll be very interesting to see how the Irish staff close out this recruiting class.




Days before facing Notre Dame, USC coach Steve Sarkisian to take leave of absence


When Notre Dame takes on rival USC on Saturday, they’ll be facing a Trojans team without a head coach. USC athletic director Pat Haden announced today that effective immediately, head coach Steve Sarkisian will be taking an indefinite leave of absence. Offensive coordinator Clay Helton will be interim head coach.

While the details are still coming into focus, multiple reports point to another incident with alcohol. Haden himself said that he made the decision after speaking with Sarkisian.

“I called Steve and talked to him. It was very clear to me that he is not healthy. I asked him to take an indefinite leave of absence,” Haden said, according to multiple Los Angeles media reports.

Sarkisian’s decision-making and alcohol use came into the spotlight this August when the head coach made inappropriate statements at a large booster event. Sarkisian addressed the media after the incident, acknowledged mixing medication with alcohol, and vowed to seek help and not to make the same mistake again.

Today’s incident appears to be a relapse, and one that requires immediate attention. Helton ran the team’s practice today and steps back into an interim head coaching role, a job he handled after the Trojans fired Lane Kiffin and Ed Orgeron left after not being awarded the permanent job.

“Fortunately or unfortunately, I have been in this situation before,” Helton said. “Once again, I’m very fortunate to have a group of first-class kids that are extremely talented and want to do something special here.”

This is the second major sports persona to leave his season to seek treatment in recent weeks. New York Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia left the team to seek treatment for alcohol issues. The Trojans are coming off an upset loss to Washington on Thursday night, losing 17-12 as a 17-point favorite.