Miami v Notre Dame

Pregame Six Pack: Bring on BYU


Leave it to Brian Kelly to spice up a week without an obvious storyline. With Everett Golson recovering from a mild concussion suffered last Saturday against Stanford, Kelly announced he’d be making a game-time decision on his starting quarterback.

Even better, he wouldn’t narrow things down between three candidates, the incumbent starter Golson, who didn’t practice this week until Wednesday, Tommy Rees, the guy people are slowly warming up to after he’s played fairly heroically as a reliever, or Andrew Hendrix, the forgotten man in the rotation, who Kelly said had a great week of practice.

So while there’s no grudge match, intriguing neutral site, or national rivalry on the line, don’t call this week boring.

Before No. 5 Notre Dame prepares to take on Brigham Young University, let’s run through six fun facts, tidbits, leftovers and miscellaneous musings before the Irish and the Cougars battle at 3:30 p.m. ET this Saturday in South Bend.


Does a game time decision at quarterback mean anything to the Irish offense moving forward?

Once again, there’s a question mark at quarterback. And while this season has been anything but ordinary behind center, there’s certainly a strategic advantage to forcing BYU to prepare for three different options at quarterback. But before we start wondering if there’s anything behind the move, let’s take Kelly at his word.

“I won’t make a decision on the quarterback until game time,” Kelly said when discussing Everett Golson’s return from a mild concussion. “We’re monitoring his health. This is about health and safety. This isn’t about who the starting quarterback is.

“I want to see Everett for 48 hours. I want to go all the way up there. I don’t think there’s a cookie cutter approach to concussions. You want to see how they handle exertion. You want to see how they handle all the things leading up in film study and watching and then get back on the field. I want to take the 48 hours that I have before I make that decision.”

Credit Kelly for taking his time with a concussion and not rushing Golson back from a vicious hit. But just for the exercise, let’s just play out the scenario at quarterback through a different lens. The Irish are 14-point favorites against BYU, meaning the Irish should win this game with any one of the three options behind center. But that certainly won’t be the case when Notre Dame travels to Norman, where they’ll face their sternest test of the season. If there’s going to be a move at quarterback — namely to Tommy Rees — this would certainly be the week to give Rees a chance to break into the lineup.

After watching the offense continue to thrive with Rees under center and Golson understandably struggle against a defense like Stanford’s, getting Rees a few more live snaps, especially while Golson is coming back from a head injury, isn’t a bad plan.

Credit Kelly for handling the delicate dance at quarterback thus far. But don’t be surprised to see multiple quarterbacks on the field this Saturday, as Notre Dame gives Bob and Mike Stoops as much to think about as possible.


If the Irish look past BYU, they’ll have done it at their own peril.

If Brian Kelly worries about his squad looking past BYU, he can just get the attention of a former Irish coach that saw his team get jumped by the boys from Provo in Notre Dame Stadium: Lou Holtz. In 1994, a Holtz team that opened the season ranked No. 3 in the country lost a mid-October date against LaVell Edwards‘ Cougars 21-41, dropping the Irish out of the top 25 and helping them skid their way to a 6-5-1 record.

The Deseret News’ Jeff Call caught up with some of the former members of that ’94 Cougar team as they recounted some of their memories.

BYU returns to South Bend Saturday (1:30 p.m. MDT, NBC) to face an undefeated Notre Dame squad that is ranked No. 5 in the nation.

For longtime assistant coach Lance Reynolds, that win 18 years ago remains fresh in his mind, adding that it ranks among the greatest in school history.

“It would have to be among the best ones,” he said. “It was at Notre Dame, against a storied program. Anytime you get a win like that, at a place like that, it’s just huge. It was kind of like the Miami game (in 1990).”

Chad Lewis, who played tight end for the Cougars and now serves as an associate athletic director, recalled that as BYU’s team buses left the stadium after the game, Fighting Irish fans put down their coats and blankets and clapped their hands. “Our team stood staring out the window at these people,” Lewis said. “It was totally amazing.”

This year’s BYU team is led by a defense that’s put up some strong statistics while the offense gets back to their roots. Chief among that unit is pass rush specialist Kyle Van Noy. At 6-foot-3, 235-pounds, the outside linebacker filled the stat sheet during his sophomore season, among the team leaders across the board statistically. He’s taken a step forward during his junior campaign, with 7.5 sacks already this season, good for fourth in the country, and 11.5 tackles for loss.

When asked to compare Van Noy with the elite linebacker he has playing for him, Kelly was complimentary.

“I actually see Van Noy more as an edge player,” Kelly said. “I think the way they ask him to play, he gets the opportunity to get after the quarterback much more than Manti. But he’s a guy that is relentless like Manti. The great players have the same traits.  It’s just they are played at different positions, but they certainly could be interchangeable.”

While the generation before them got caught up in the mystique of Notre Dame, don’t expect this team to be awestruck.

“I don’t really get sucked into the hype of it all. It’ll be fun to go to South Bend and play there,” linebacker Spencer Hadley said. “Fans get to approach it that way but as players we don’t really get to look at it like that. It’s a business trip. It’s not like we’re going to Disneyland. We’re going to play a football game and we’re preparing as such.”


While we haven’t seen him yet on the field, safety Chris Badger isn’t questioning his decision to come back to Notre Dame.

Safety Chris Badger faces off against BYU, a program many thought the Utah native would be playing for by now. But Badger, who left Notre Dame after participating in Brian Kelly’s first spring practice to spend the better part of two years serving his Mormon mission in Ecuador, is settling in nicely in South Bend.

While many expected the 20-year-old freshman to be one of the early contributors on the field, spending two years away from the game, not to mention living in an impoverished third-world country, makes the transition back to major college football a difficult one.

Former Utah safety Steve Tate, who played for Urban Meyer, mentored Badger throughout the recruiting process and has stayed in touch with him during his journey from South Bend to Ecuador and back, talked about that difficult transition.

“I can only imagine what it’s like at Notre Dame,” Tate told the Deseret News. “You’ve got to be patient with guys off missions. You kind of feel like you are on an island, and as everyone knows at Utah and BYU, its difficult to get back in shape.”

When Tate got back, Eric Weddle told him he looked out of shape. “Well,” he replied, “I’ve been in a third-world country (Argentina) for two years.” That Badger is redshirting this year will make a big difference, said Tate.

Badger has had to deal with the realities of building a football program like Notre Dame, where he’s believed to be the first football player to have taken a Mormon mission.

“In an elite program, they don’t juggle their recruiting or numbers around returned missionaries,” Badger’s brother Troy told the Desert News. “Notre Dame and Kelly were great when Chris wanted to go on a mission. When you look at it, there haven’t been many successful returned missionaries at the big-time programs that recruit nationally. Most LDS athletes haven’t interrupted their careers to do it. For Chris, his chances were better if he stayed. But he really felt like he needed to go and he had a great experience in Ecuador. Now he’s back, it will take some work as well as luck to get that opportunity.”

Badger will be in uniform on the sideline against BYU, but won’t likely get his shot on the field until next season.


Everybody remembers USC, but Manti Te’o was also the one who got away for BYU, too.

Most Trojan fans grimace when they see video of a young Manti Te’o picking that Notre Dame hat back in Hawaii. But before Te’o narrowed things down to Notre Dame and USC, BYU head coach Bronco Mendenhall gave chase after the Hawaiian linebacker.

“We wanted Manti,” BYU coach Bronco Mendenhall acknowledged. “We thought he was an excellent player. Heavy recruiting race. Had an official visit, saw everything that we had to offer, and [he] really didn’t want BYU. So, certainly our evaluation [of him] as a player was right. He’s very good.”

Adding to BYU’s pain was the fact that several of his family members told reporters prior to his official decision that he was leaning heavily toward BYU. Rumors abounded that something happened on his official visit that turned him away. However, Mendenhall said Tuesday he never felt like BYU had the edge. Nor did he ever get a reason from Te’o about why he rejected BYU.

“I don’t ever think it was [certain] that he was heading here,” Mendenhall said. “He chose to go elsewhere, and we wished him well, and that was it. I am glad to see he is having success.”

The Cougars (and Trojans) loss was certainly Notre Dame’s gain.

“I prayed about it, and everything pointed towards Notre Dame,” Te’o said this week about his collegiate choice. “Notre Dame is where I came because I was directed to come here.”


In his final year at Notre Dame, Kapron Lewis-Moore is making it count.

It was hardly the type of senior season you’d want to remember. After a knee injury cut his season short against USC, Kapron Lewis-Moore watched as his team’s season short-circuited as well. The veteran defensive end, who was one of the many Charlie Weis recruits rankled by Kelly’s infamous radio comments that nearly divided the team, carried a large chip on his shoulder as a season that opened with promise turned into an 8-5 year spent largely in neutral.

That chip might have stuck with Lewis-Moore into the spring as well, especially when he returned to practice after rehabbing his injury only to be rising sophomore Aaron Lynch’s back-up. It was an irritating bit of fuel for his inner fire.

“I’d be lying if I said it wasn’t,” Lewis-Moore told the Chicago Tribune. “Even if he was still here, I would still do whatever it takes to help the team. If my role was to be on the bench, or whatever, hey, so be it. I know what I can bring to the team.”

But Lynch is no longer in South Bend, instead waiting in South Florida for his year long sabbatical to end before he can return to football. But for Lewis-Moore, the home stretch of his collegiate career is upon us, and the fifth-year veteran, named one of the team’s captains this fall, has done his best to make up for lost time.

Lewis-Moore is anchoring the defensive end spot across from Stephon Tuitt, chipping in 18 tackles, with a sack and two TFLs. He’s also been a role model for young players like Sheldon Day, while contributing to the stiff defense front that makes running against Notre Dame so difficult.

“It’s crazy around here. Everybody is excited. At the same time, we have to keep our eye on the prize,” Lewis-Moore said.

Spoken like a true veteran.


As the Irish offense evolves, productivity trends emerge.

After listening to Brian Kelly earlier in the week, you get the feeling there’s plenty more to it than statistical breakdowns, but after six games, it’s time to start looking at some trends that are starting to emerge. As Notre Dame looks for ways to get more out of its offense, it might start looking at the productivity of their offensive weapons.

A quick down and dirty analysis of player targets and player production gives you an interesting look at the team’s offensive weapons and how well they’ve been performing. Let’s take a quick look at some of the key players.

Theo Riddick
80 rushes for 308 yards. 20 catches on 30 targets for 170 yards.
Targeted: 28% Production: 20%

Cierre Wood
47 rushes for 277 yards. 2 catches on 2 targets for 9 yards.
Targeted: 13% Production: 12%

George Atkinson
32 rushes for 290 yards. 2 catches on 2 targets for 41 yards.
Targeted: 9% Production: 12%

TJ Jones
19 catches on 33 targets for 235 yards.
Targeted: 9% Production: 10%

Davaris Daniels
14 catches on 21 targets for 231 yards
Targeted: 5% Production: 10%

Robby Toma
12 catches on 18 targets for 118 yards. 3 rushes for 23 yards.
Targeted: 5% Production: 6%

Tyler Eifert
15 catches on 28 targets for 246 yards.
Targeted: 7% Production: 10%

Suspension or not, it’s amazing that Theo Riddick has been targeted on 28% of Notre Dame’s plays from scrimmage, yet only produces 20% of the team’s total offense. You can say what you want about the play calls, blocking, or other circumstances, but no player is producing less with their opportunities than Riddick.

It’s also not hard to see who this team’s most explosive player is. With only nine percent of the team’s targets, George Atkinson is accounting for 12 percent of production. Only Tyler Eifert (+3%) and Davaris Daniels (+5%) is outperforming their opportunities like that, and it makes you wonder what that ankle injury did to slow down Daniels’ productivity.

A few quick looks at how to get this offense more effective:

* Do a better job of capitalizing on throws to Eifert — he’s only caught 15 of his 28 targets.
* Get the ball in George Atkinson’s hands more.
* If you’re going to give the ball to Riddick, do it through the air.
* Keep receivers like Daniels, TJ Jones, and Robby Toma involved.

Go for two or not? Both sides of the highly-debated topic

during their game at Clemson Memorial Stadium on October 3, 2015 in Clemson, South Carolina.

Notre Dame’s two failed two-point conversion tries against Clemson have been the source of much debate in the aftermath of the Irish’s 24-22 loss to the Tigers. Brian Kelly’s decision to go for two with just over 14 minutes left in the game forced the Irish into another two-point conversion attempt with just seconds left in regulation, with DeShone Kizer falling short as he attempted to push the game into overtime.

Was Kelly’s decision to go for two the right one at the beginning of the fourth quarter? That depends.

Take away the result—a pass that flew through the fingers of a wide open Corey Robinson. Had the Irish kicked their extra point, Justin Yoon would’ve trotted onto the field with a chance to send the game into overtime. (Then again, had Robinson caught the pass, Notre Dame would’ve been kicking for the win in the final seconds…)

This is the second time a two-point conversion decision has opened Kelly up to second guessing in the past eight games. Last last season, Kelly’s decision to go for two in the fourth-quarter with an 11-point lead against Northwestern, came back to bite the Irish and helped the Wildcats stun Notre Dame in overtime.

That choice was likely fueled by struggles in the kicking game, heightened by Kyle Brindza’s blocked extra-point attempt in the first half, a kick returned by Northwestern that turned a 14-7 game into a 13-9 lead. With a fourth-quarter, 11-point lead, the Irish failed to convert their two-point attempt that would’ve stretched their lead to 13 points. After Northwestern converted their own two-point play, they made a game-tying field goal after Cam McDaniel fumbled the ball as the Irish were running out the clock. Had the Irish gone for (and converted) a PAT, the Wildcats would’ve needed to score a touchdown.

Moving back to Saturday night, Kelly’s decision needs to be put into context. After being held to just three points for the first 45 minutes of the game, C.J. Prosise broke a long catch and run for a touchdown in the opening minute of the fourth quarter. Clemson would be doing their best to kill the clock. Notre Dame’s first touchdown of the game brought the score within 12 points when Kelly decided to try and push the score within 10—likely remembering the very way Northwestern forced overtime.

After the game, Kelly said it was the right decision, citing his two-point conversion card and the time left in the game. On his Sunday afternoon teleconference, he said the same, giving a bit more rationale for his decision.

“We were down and we got the chance to put that game into a two-score with a field goal. I don’t chase the points until the fourth quarter, and our mathematical chart, which I have on the sideline with me and we have a senior adviser who concurred with me, and we said go for two. It says on our chart to go for two.

“We usually don’t use the chart until the fourth quarter because, again, we don’t chase the points. We went for two to make it a 10-point game. So we felt we had the wind with us so we would have to score a touchdown and a field goal because we felt like we probably only had three more possessions.

“The way they were running the clock, we’d probably get three possessions maximum and we’re going to have to score in two out of the three. So it was the smart decision to make, it was the right one to make. Obviously, you know, if we catch the two-point conversion, which was wide open, then we just kick the extra point and we’ve got a different outcome.”

That logic and rationale is why I had no problem with the decision when it happened in real time. But not everybody agrees.

Perhaps the strongest rebuke of the decision came from Irish Illustrated’s Tim Prister, who had this to say about the decision in his (somewhat appropriately-titled) weekly Point After column:

Hire another analyst or at least assign someone to the task of deciphering the Beautiful Mind-level math problem that seems to be vexing the Notre Dame brain-trust when a dweeb with half-inch thick glasses and a pocket protector full of pens could tell you that in the game of football, you can’t chase points before it is time… (moving ahead)

…The more astonishing thing is that no one in the ever-growing football organization that now adds analysts and advisors on a regular basis will offer the much-needed advice. Making such decisions in the heat of battle is not easy. What one thinks of in front of the TV or in a press box does not come as clearly when you’re the one pulling the trigger for millions to digest.

And yet with this ever-expanding entourage, Notre Dame still does not have anyone who can scream through the headphones to the head coach, “Coach, don’t go for two!”

If someone, anyone within the organization had the common sense and then the courage to do so, the Irish wouldn’t have lost every game in November of 2014 and would have had a chance to win in overtime against Clemson Saturday night.

My biggest gripe about the decision was the indecision that came along with the choice. Scoring on a big-play tends to stress your team as special teams players shuffle onto the field and the offense comes off. But Notre Dame’s use of a timeout was a painful one, and certainly should’ve been spared considering the replay review that gave Notre Dame’s coaching staff more time to make a decision.

For what it’s worth, Kelly’s decision was probably similar to the one many head coaches would make. And it stems from the original two-point conversion chart that Dick Vermeil developed back in the 1970s.

The original chart didn’t account for success rate or time left in the game. As Kelly mentioned before, Notre Dame uses one once it’s the fourth quarter.

It’s a debate that won’t end any time soon. And certainly one that will have hindsight on the side of the “kick the football” argument.



Navy, Notre Dame will display mutual respect with uniforms

Keenan Reynolds, Isaac Rochell

The storied and important history of Notre Dame and Navy’s long-running rivalry will be on display this weekend, with the undefeated Midshipmen coming to South Bend this weekend.

On NBCSN, a half-hour documentary presentation will take a closer look, with “Onward Notre Dame: Mutual Respect” talking about everything from Notre Dame’s 43-year winning streak, to Navy’s revival, triggered by their victory in 2007. The episode will also talk about the rivalries ties to World War II, and how the Navy helped keep Notre Dame alive during wartime.

You can catch it on tonight at 6:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN or online in the same viewing window.

On the field, perhaps an even more unique gesture of respect is planned. With Under Armour the apparel partner for both Notre Dame and Navy, both teams will take the field wearing the same cleats, gloves and baselayers. Each team’s coaching staff will also be outfitted in the same sideline gear.

More from Monday’s press release:

For the first time in college football, two opponents take the field with the exact same Under Armour baselayer, gloves and cleats to pay homage to the storied history and brotherhood between their two schools. The baselayer features both Universities’ alma maters on the sleeves and glove palms with the words “respect, honor, tradition” as a reminder of their connection to each other. Both sidelines and coaches also will wear the same sideline gear as a sign of mutual admiration.​

Navy and Notre Dame will meet for the 89th time on Saturday, a rivalry that dates back to 1927. After the Midshipmen won three of four games starting in 2007, Notre Dame hopes to extend their current winning streak to five games on Saturday.

Here’s an early look at some of the gear: