Brian Kelly podium

Kelly discusses Irish football program with Colin Cowherd

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Brian Kelly was fulfilling a few media obligations before turning his  focus onto the big match-up with Oklahoma this weekend. Part of that media tour included a few minutes in the “Herd,” joining ESPN’s Colin Cowherd to discuss the state of the Irish football program, and go one-on-one with a pretty polarizing radio personality that hasn’t had the nicest things to say about the Notre Dame program the past few years.

If you waste a lot of time getting worked up over Cowherd’s antics or opinions, you’re largely barking at the moon. That is what the man does. He’s quick witted, opinionated, and dictates the tone and discussion on his show by making a statement, defending it with a few persuasive points, then usually moves on before too many people can poke holes in his theories.

Amateur critical radio analysis aside, Cowherd does spend quite a bit of time talking about college football, a semi-rarity on the national scene. And while his friendship with Lane Kiffin and affinity for Manhattan Beach (you can’t blame him for half of this) largely have Irish fans believing it colors his opinion, Cowherd has spent the last week or so talking about how overrated the Irish are right now (while calling USC — a team that lost to Stanford — a better team.)

You can listen to the entire exchange here, but it’s actually an interesting discussion on the state of Notre Dame football, the problems that plague the offense, and how Kelly goes about the job rebuilding the football program while trying to win football games now. If you don’t have nine minutes to listen, here’s a rough transcription of the conversation:

Cowherd: I can’t figure out offensively what you’re doing. What are you offensively, coach?

Brian Kelly: We’re trying to find ourselves. We’re young on the outside with inexperienced wide receivers. We’ve got a tight end that we’re trying to get the football to and we’ve got three outstanding running backs. When you’re moving two quarterbacks in and out of the game, it’s really hard to have a set identity. We’re just trying to find ways to put enough points on the board, rely on a great defense, neutralize things in the special teams and win football games. Until we get ourselves in a situation where our quarterback is ready to start and finish a game, it’s just the way we’re going to have to put it together.

Cowherd: Come on, coach. You’re half way through the season. Figure out your offensive identity. Pick a quarterback. Can’t I say that?

BK: Again, I’d say that we’ve run the football extremely well against good defenses. I think that’s really where we’re going to manage the football game. My background is that I like to spread it, run up-tempo, and throw the football. We’re not ready to do that, but at Notre Dame, you can’t not be ready to win. You’ve got to win each and every week. So we’re going to eke out a way to move the football and put enough points on the board. And when we’re ready to move to that next level, it’ll be when our quarterback is.

Cowherd: Seventeen points, 20, 13, 20, 20. In four of your six games, you’re scoring about that. You guys get a sense going into games, you’ve gotta put points on the board. What do you think you’ve got to put on the board this weekend to go to Oklahoma and win realistically?

BK: Again, it depends on how we play the game. For example, BYU averaged 98 plays a game the weekend before. We got them to 60, we took 38 plays away from them. So, we’re going to try and help our defense the best we can to keep the points down on that end and then obviously, if they’re an offense that’s putting points on the board, we’re going to have to do some things offensively in spreading the field and throwing the football around. So it’s really predicated on how we’re playing defense, as to how we are playing offensively.

Cowherd: College football is not entirely fair… until we get a playoff. Scheduling matters a lot. What if I said, ‘Coach, a lot of Big Ten teams. The Big Ten is not very good.” Who have you beaten? Is that a fair criticism?

BK: Going into the season, I can only look at our schedule and talk about the teams. We went to Michigan State when they were 10th in the country and beat a team at that time that was top ranked. We had to beat Michigan. I think Stanford is a darn good football team. And we’ve got to play that kind of schedule each and every week. Our opener was in Ireland. Then we went Purdue, Michigan, Michigan State. It’s a tough schedule that requires your guys to be on each and every week and they’ve been on seven straight weeks and let’s see if we can get it to eight.

Cowherd: What do you make of the talk that Notre Dame is relevant. (He mentions Rick Reilly.) Whether or not they’re great is a different story. Do you listen? Your players hear stuff. What do you make of it?

BK: I really think that our kids are above the noise. They hear it. They watch ESPN. They listen to the talk shows. But the way we’ve got this focused is, look, we’re trying to be a consistent program. We want to be a part of the discussion not just one year, we want to do it each and every year. And as we do that, and build consistency, look at Oklahoma. They’ve been there every single year. That’s the level that we need to get this football program. Not just one year, where I get to go on your show. So our players understand it’s about consistency, not just about one spike. I didn’t come to Notre Dame because we wanted to have one great year it’s about a consistency… We’re not a great team, but I’ll tell you what, we’re mentally and physically tough and we’ll go and play you anywhere and any time. All I have to do to our kids is let them know is that they’re building a program.

C: You just said, you’re not a great team. That’s all that I said.

BK: I would be the first to tell you that we’re not a great team. But we’re a football team that’s getting better each and every week. Once we firmly have experience and an identity on offense, and keep building our defensive depth and special teams, we’ve got a chance to be a really good football team. That’s the process we’re in right now.

Cowherd expounds on a theory about Oregon’s face-paced offense and how he’d stop them. Kelly politely listens, largely agrees, and they move on.

C: This wasn’t nearly as contentious as I was hoping for.

BK: I’ll get in an argument if you want. (Laughter) We’re trying to build this thing so we can have this conversation in three or four years and we can talk about whether we’re great or not.

Next up, Desmond Howard. (Just kidding.)

 

Irish A-to-Z: Jay Hayes

Jay Hayes Irish 247
Irish247, Tom Loy
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A freshman season with a redshirt burned in November. A sophomore year with a redshirt earned begrudgingly.

Entering his third season in the program, Jay Hayes has a chance to erase any conversation about “will-he-play-or-won’t-he?” Because Hayes is a key piece of the puzzle for the Irish on the defensive front.

Spring practice saw Hayes move to the forefront, a surprise contender for a starting job at weakside defensive end. Recruited (and built) like a defensive tackle, Hayes isn’t your prototype edge player. But he’s one of the big reasons Brian Kelly is optimistic that his defensive is going to take a step forward in Brian VanGorder’s third season.

 

JAY HAYES
6’3″, 285 lbs.
Junior, No. 93, DE

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A four-star, Top 250 prospect. Hayes was one of New York’s top recruits, with offers from  Alabama, Florida, Florida State, Georgia, Michigan, Oregon and USC.

With tweener size, Hayes projection seemed somewhere between defensive end and defensive tackle, with many projecting a career at three-technique.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2014): Saw action in the season’s final three games, taking off his redshirt and playing against Louisville, USC and LSU. Suffered an ankle injury against USC, but did manage to return for the bowl victory against LSU.

Sophomore Season (2015): Did not see action, preserving a year of eligibility.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

Didn’t see the redshirt coming. (Maybe Hayes didn’t either?)

Hayes will be one of Keith Gilmore’s test cases. The veteran defensive line coach was brought in to get the next wave of players ready along the defensive line, and Hayes certainly fits in that first tier.

At this point, you can’t feel 100-percent positive about Day or Jones until you see them running and fully healthy in fall camp. (That’s the pessimist that doesn’t naturally come out in me.) So if there’s any issue with either of those two, you’ve got to assume that Hayes is going to be the beneficiary—ready or not.

Notre Dame could use a disruptive force along the defensive line, especially with a pass rush all but missing in action last season. Is Hayes that player? I don’t get the feeling he is, though it’s certainly not a prerequisite for a defensive tackle.

Either way, Hayes has the makings of a good one. We’ll find out how good come September.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

If Hayes is a starter on the defensive line, he’s on a trajectory that Brian Kelly felt fairly confident about when he decided to put Hayes on the field late in the season as a freshman. Kelly referenced the decisions to leave early by both Louis Nix and Stephon Tuitt when putting Hayes into action, noting that great defensive linemen don’t stick around for five seasons.

If Hayes is able to work his way into that echelon of lineman, the Irish will be very happy. Because with just three games played and a two career tackles to his name through two seasons, he didn’t exactly sprint out of the gates.

 

Kelly made reference to Hayes a few times this summer as a guy flying under the radar. That feels like a genuine prediction when you consider his comments from 2014 and his depth chart move last spring.

Is Hayes a dominant college player? Hard to tell without seeing him get a chance. But that his head coach believes big things are coming is a good sign.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

When Notre Dame lines up on defense against Texas, expect to see Hayes opposite Isaac Rochell at defensive end. Notre Dame’s front four will be among the largest in the country if that happens—two 290-pound defensive ends and two 300-plus pounders in the trenches.

That said, if Hayes is going to stick at end, he might spend the summer slimming down. Shedding 10 pounds and playing closer to 275 might give him an extra half-step, something that could come in handy when coming off the edge.

But even without a weight loss, Hayes is going to have a productive season. If healthy, I’ve got him penciled in for double-digit starts, approaching ten TFLs, and the second most tackles on the defensive line.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg
Jalen Elliott
Nicco Feritta
Tarean Folston
Mark Harrell
Daelin Hayes

Irish A-to-Z: Daelin Hayes

Daelin Hayes 247
Irish 247
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Notre Dame’s best pass rusher may be true freshman Daelin Hayes. The early-entry freshman came to South Bend with a 5-star rating and an NFL physique, but there are more questions than answers about the Michigan native.

None of those queries are bigger than his actually on-field abilities. With shoulder injuries plaguing him for two high school seasons and off-field family issues putting him in eligibility purgatory, Hayes is an elite football prospect in spite of the fact that he hasn’t played a lot of football.

Capable of practicing this spring even if he arrived on campus just weeks removed from a shoulder surgery, Hayes took reps and stayed active this spring, mostly because he’s the perfect fit for a pass-rushing role this fall—assuming his body (and brain) allow it.

 

 

DAELIN HAYES
6’3.5″, 257 lbs.
Freshman, No. 9, DE

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A U.S. Army All-American selection, Hayes earned a 5-star ranking from Rivals and was one of the best players in the Midwest, despite not being on the football field for much of his three seasons of high school football.

But that didn’t keep college football’s top programs from chasing him and Notre Dame won a hard-fought recruiting battle over programs like Ohio State, Michigan, Alabama, Georgia, Oklahoma and USC.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Hayes opened eyes immediately on campus, testing with a 4.8 40-yard dash at 257 pounds. That type of speed allows him to play linebacker as well as defensive end, though it’s obviously a big reason why everybody sees a potential edge rusher when they look at him. The Irish staff cross-trained him this spring, though it’s pretty clear the need at weakside defensive end begs for Hayes to find a home there.

If Hayes stays healthy, he’s every bit the NFL prospect you come to expect from a 5-star defensive end recruit. I’m not sure he’s an Aaron Lynch type recruit (he’s shorted and thicker than the current version of Lynch), but the Irish roster doesn’t have a lot of athletes like this capable of chasing the quarterback.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I see a designated pass rusher season coming on for Hayes, with the hopes that it’ll allow him to specialize at something, and potentially stay healthy in a restricted role. Some have mentioned Kolin Hill’s freshman campaign as a comp. I think that’s setting the bar too low.

Instead, look at Prince Shumbo’s rookie campaign. Even as a tweener, Shembo found the field in pass rush situations, putting together a nice stat line with five TFLs and 4.5 sacks as a freshman.

Again, the hope is Hayes is a quick learner, because he’s played less than a full season of football at the high school level. So while he may have been a workout warrior and dominated the camp circuit on his way to a 5-star grade, that’s just not a lot of experience.

The good news? Notre Dame’s not asking him to play quarterback or free safety. They need him to chase down quarterbacks—a skill Keith Gilmore should be able to unearth from Hayes rather quickly.

Hayes should play every week this season if he can stay on the field. If he does that, I’ll say he matches Shembo’s freshman season.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg
Jalen Elliott
Nicco Feritta
Tarean Folston
Mark Harrell

Irish A-to-Z: Mark Harrell

Mark Harrell
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As a fifth-year player, Mark Harrell is the elder statesman of the offensive line. He’s also still waiting for his opportunity to crack the starting lineup.

That chance won’t likely come unless something goes wrong. But Harrell is the closing thing to an insurance policy on the offensive line, a versatile reserve who has spent time playing virtually every position up front.

Likely a bridge at tackle between starters Mike McGlinchey and Alex Bars and talented freshmen Tommy Kraemer and Liam Eichenberg, Harrell’s a program player, with loyalty running two-ways as he plays out his eligibility in South Bend.

 

MARK HARRELL
6’4″, 306 lbs.
Grad Student, No. 75, OL

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A three or four-star prospect depending on the service, Harrell was a first-team All-State player in North Carolina with offers from Michigan, Auburn, Clemson, North Carolina, South Carolina, Stanford and Tennessee.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2012): Did not see action, saving a year of eligibility.

Sophomore Season (2013): Did not see action.

Junior Season (2014): Played in two games, seeing action against Rice and Michigan. Served as a backup at center, with the ability to also play guard and tackle.

Senior Season (2015): Saw action in five games. Played 12 snaps at right tackle against UMass, earning a +1.2 grade from PFF-College.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

Feels like I could copy and paste after swapping out Ronnie Stanley and Nick Martin’s names.

Harrell has the type of positional versatility you want in a backup. He served as a reserve center last year during the Blue-Gold game, and while he’s no longer on the depth chart behind Nick Martin, he’d likely be called upon in a pinch rather than burning Tristen Hoge’s redshirt. What happens if Ronnie Stanley or Mike McGlinchey go down at tackle is largely a mystery as well, so there’s likely playing opportunities, but again, only if things start to go awry.

Harrell will likely spend some time on special teams in 2015, capable of taking some snaps on field goal and punt teams. But the depth chart is packed and one of the toughest spots to get on the field, and Harrell’s lack of opportunity is largely because of the talent in front of him.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

A fifth-year backup, Harrell was tapped by Kelly this spring to move outside to tackle, hoping to solidify a depth chart that’s thinner than you’d expect, considering the impressive recruiting Harry Hiestand has done during his tenure in South Bend. But Harrell is likely on the outside because Jerry Tillery is playing defensive tackle and Ronnie Stanley was the first offensive lineman selected in the NFL Draft.

It’s hard to know what Harrell can do if we haven’t seen him do it yet. But at this point, the fact that the coaching staff preferred keeping him on the roster and serving as a backup (likely at right tackle) is telling—because there’s a very high likelihood that Harrell could’ve used his graduate transfer to step onto a campus of a lower-tier program and start right away.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

If all goes according to plan, we’ll only see Harrell in mop-up situations or on special teams. If it doesn’t? Expect to see how he does at right tackle, with a redshirt preferred for both talented freshmen tackles.

 

Regardless, peg Harrell for more appearances in 2016 than his career total of seven games, knowing that it’ll be important to gain some experience and keep McGlinchey and Bars fresh.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg
Jalen Elliott
Nicco Feritta
Tarean Folston

Irish A-to-Z: Tarean Folston

Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl
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When Tarean Folston limped off the field after his third carry of the season, few knew what would happen next. The junior running back’s season was finished. But it spawned giant years for C.J. Prosise and Josh Adams, turning Prosise into a third-round draft pick and Adams into the most prolific freshman runner in school history.

That big year could’ve been Folston’s. Behind an elite offensive line, the Florida native was primed to be the leading man in the Irish backfield, with a breakout season all but guaranteed.

But injuries happen. And after working his way back into shape during spring practice and returning to a depth chart that all of a sudden has some young competition, 2016 is a chance to make up for lost time.

 

TAREAN FOLSTON
5’9.5″, 214 lbs.
Senior, No. 25, RB

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

Notre Dame beat out Auburn on Signing Day, waiting a few uncomfortable extra hours for a fax from Folston after he went on a late-January visit. Folston was Florida’s 4A first-team All-State running back, a do-everything high school player.

The Under-Armour All-American had offers from Oregon, Florida, Florida State and a few dozen other programs before picking Notre Dame in early January.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2013): Played in 12 games, starting two as a true freshman. Nearly set a single-game freshman rushing record when he ran for 140 yards against Navy, the most since 1999. Named Offensive Newcomer of the Year.

Sophomore Season (2014): Ran for 889 yards and caught 190 yards worth of passes as the team’s leading rusher. Averaged over 5.0 yards per carry for the second-straight season. Broke 100 yards in four out of five games, coming two yards shy against North Carolina of making it five out of six.

Junior Season (2015): His season was cut short after just three carries (for 19 yards) against Texas, lost for the year with a torn ACL. Earned a medical redshirt.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

There’s no doubt in my mind that Folston wouldn’t put up monster numbers last year if he stayed healthy.

I’m doubling down on Folston. I expect the biggest season from a running back in the Kelly era — and I’m pegging Folston for a 1,200 yard, double-digit touchdown 2015.

Part of this confidence comes from seeing what Mike Sanford did riding a running QB and top-shelf back at Boise State. The other part comes from seeing Notre Dame’s offensive line figure itself out this spring instead of mixing and matching into fall camp.

But mostly it comes from the natural talent I see with Folston, a back who’ll get better as he collects touches. There’s nobody to steal them from Folston to begin the season. And after he establishes himself, there’s nobody who should take them away from him, either.

So stay healthy and Notre Dame will have a running back to showcase.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

My biggest question for Folston has also been one of his biggest strengths—the space between his ears. For two seasons, Folston’s vision and Football IQ have been excellent. The natural ability he displayed—too often in flashes—made him the envy of a depth chart filled with talented runners.

But coming back from a knee injury is different. And Folston needs to be able to cut loose with absolute conviction and get up the field, because breakaway speed has never been the power of his game.

The depth chart Folston returns to is a different beast than the one he left. Adams has the heft to run between the tackles and the speed to hit a home run. Dexter Williams is greatly improved. Even Justin Brent is an envious No. 4 back.

But Folston is an NFL running back. His versatility, ability to catch the ball in space, and make defenders miss likely didn’t go anywhere.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

This is Notre Dame’s leading ball carrier in 2016. That may be a bold statement. Or it could turn out to be an obvious one after we see Folston ripping through Texas and Nevada.

Still, this is a leap of faith considering we only saw brief glimpses of Folston is spring football, donning a non-contact jersey in the Blue-Gold game. And because of the season Adams put together in 2015. But Brian Kelly believes too much in his veteran running back and knows his value to this offense. With a running game that’ll likely be the strength of the attack, putting the ball in Folston’s hands early and often can’t be a bad plan.

I’m still betting that Josh Adams ends up with a higher yard-per-carry average, but I think Folston’s senior season will be his best in South Bend.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg
Jalen Elliott
Nicco Fertitta