Santa Louis Nix III

Nix shows wisdom in returning to Notre Dame


You could forgive Louis Nix for capitalizing on the hard work he’s put in as a football player. Committing to Notre Dame with the program in the middle of a coaching transition, the high school senior from a hard knock neighborhood and an oversized family, brought a preternatural maturity and wisdom that belies his jokester persona that’s turned him into one of the most beloved players on the Irish roster.

That maturity helped him pick Notre Dame, even without knowing the team’s defensive scheme or plans at head coach.

“I don’t believe it was a risk,” Nix said of committing to Notre Dame without a head coach in place. “You don’t come to college for a coach. I wasn’t coming to college because of a Nick Saban or a Brian Kelly or anything. I came for the school.”

That Nix found his match in South Bend, Indiana is one of the wonderful things about college football. That he’s been able to immerse himself into a school and a culture as remarkably different from the one he grew up in should be part of any recruiting pitch Notre Dame coaches give.

Yet it hasn’t been easy for Nix. He spent his first year at college reshaping who he was on both the inside and the outside, transforming a body that pushed upwards to almost 370 pounds, and training himself to be disciplined in an academic structure unlike anything he ever experienced growing up. Nix’s tremendous sense of humor and flair for life helped him as a Film, Television and Theater major, as he created online personas and viral YouTube videos.

But the work he’s done on the field — turning himself into one of the most immovable and athletic nose guards in the country — has been a tremendous credit to Nix, and has given him the opportunity to even consider the NFL after just two seasons of competition on the field. And while the allure of playing at the next level was a serious consideration, the decision to return to school was one Nix made even without hearing from the league, pulling the trigger preemptively — not unlike his choice to head north for college three years ago.

“It’s like the recruiting process,” Nix said of the uncertainty. “People want to know when you’re going to commit, where you’re going to sign, and once you do it, it’s a huge weight off your shoulders.”

For Nix, there were a variety of factors that played into the decision. But one large one was Senior Day. It’s a moment that can transcend sport, a rite of passage where an athlete and his parents meet on the field, taking a minute to acknowledge the road that it took to get there. And it was a moment that was too special for Nix and especially his mother, Stephanie Wingfield, to pass up.

“She called me every day like ‘I can’t wait to walk on the field with you for Senior Day,'” Nix said yesterday. “In high school, she didn’t get to do Senior Day with me. She barely made it to any of my games. She didn’t do the Senior Day in high school and she cried. That was a big one for me.”

That’s because Wingfield had bills to pay and mouths to feed, supporting Nix and his ten siblings, working that evening at her job in a hospital cafeteria.

“She just had to work all the time,” Nix said. “I couldn’t afford to let her take off and she couldn’t afford to take off. And she cried when it happened and she was kind of mad at me. She really wanted to be there and I walked on the field by myself and people were like, ‘Where are his parents?’ She didn’t like stuff like that.”

“This will give her the opportunity to come up and do that for once. And be happy.”

Special moments like that are enough to defer a dream that could immediately end any double-shifts for Nix’s mother, and take them out of a cramped home that’s bursting at the seams.

“We’ve been surviving this far. We’ll be okay, I guess,” Nix said.

Returning for another season will also allow Nix to get his degree, giving him a fallback plan in case things don’t work out in the NFL. It’s a big reason why Nix chose Notre Dame in the first place, and a big reason why the junior will go from one of the biggest reclamation projects on the Irish roster to one of the finest players in the country.

“When I got here I was one of those guys in the back, just trying to make it — you know, out of shape,” Nix said. “At the same time, I didn’t give up on myself and no one gave up on me. I get better as time goes by. Hopefully I’m a better person, better man, and better player next year.”



Even amidst chaos, Kelly expecting USC’s best

JuJu Smith-Schuster, Rocky Hayes, Blaise Taylor

USC head coach Steve Sarkisian was fired on Monday, with interim head coach Clay Helton taking the reins of the Trojan program during tumultuous times. Helton will be the fourth different USC head coach to face Notre Dame in as many years, illustrative of the chaos that’s shaken up Heritage Hall in the years since Pete Carroll left for the NFL.

All eyes are on the SC program, with heat on athletic director Pat Haden and the ensuing media circus that only Los Angeles can provide. But Brian Kelly doesn’t expect anything but their best when USC boards a plane to take on the Irish in South Bend.

While the majority of Notre Dame’s focus will be inward this week, Kelly did take the time on Sunday and Monday to talk with his team about the changes atop the Trojan program, and how they’ll likely impact the battle for the Jeweled Shillelagh.

“We talked about there would be an interim coach, and what that means,” Kelly said. “Teams come together under those circumstances and they’re going to play their very best. And I just reminded them of that.”

While nobody on this Notre Dame roster has experienced a coaching change, they’ve seen their share of scrutiny. The Irish managed to spring an upset not many saw coming against LSU last year in the Music City Bowl after a humiliating defeat against the Trojans and amidst the chaos of a quarterbacking controversy. And just last week, we saw Charlie Strong’s team spring an upset against arch rival Oklahoma when just about everybody left the Longhorns for dead.

“I think you look at the way Texas responded this past weekend with a lot of media scrutiny,” Kelly said Tuesday. “I expect USC to respond the same way, so we’re going to have to play extremely well.”

Outside of the head coaching departure, it’s difficult to know if there’ll be any significant difference between a team lead by Sarkisian or the one that Helton will lead into battle. The offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach has been at USC for six years, and has already held the title of interim head coach when he led the Trojans to a 2013 Las Vegas Bowl title after Lane Kiffin was fired and Ed Orgeron left the program after he wasn’t given the full time position.

Helton will likely call plays, a role he partially handled even when Sarkisian was on the sideline. The defense will still be run by Justin Wilcox. And more importantly, the game plan will be executed by a group of players that are among the most talented in the country.

“They have some of the finest athletes in the country. I’ve recruited a lot of them, and they have an immense amount of pride for their program and personal pride,” Kelly said. “So they will come out with that here at Notre Dame, there is no question about that.”

Irish add commitment from CB Donte Vaughn

Donte Vaughn

Notre Dame’s recruiting class grew on Monday. And in adding 6-foot-3 Memphis cornerback Donte Vaughn, it grew considerably.

The Irish added another jumbo-sized skill player in Vaughn, beating out a slew of SEC offers for the intriguing cover man. Vaughn picked Notre Dame over offers from Auburn, LSU, Miami, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, Tennessee and Texas A&M among others.

He made the announcement on Monday, his 18th birthday:

It remains to be seen if Vaughn can run like a true cornerback. But his length certainly gives him a skill-set that doesn’t currently exist on the Notre Dame roster.

Interestingly enough, Vaughn’s commitment comes a cycle after Brian VanGorder made news by going after out-of-profile coverman Shaun Crawford, immediately offering the 5-foot-9 cornerback after taking over for Bob Diaco, who passed because of Crawford’s size. An ACL injury cut short Crawford’s freshman season before it got started, but not before Crawford already proved he’ll be a valuable piece of the Irish secondary for years to come.

Vaughn is another freaky athlete in a class that already features British Columbia’s Chase Claypool. With a safety depth chart that’s likely turning over quite a bit in the next two seasons, Vaughn can clearly shift over if that’s needed, though Notre Dame adding length like Vaughn clearly points to some of the shifting trends after Richard Sherman went from an average wide receiver to one of the best cornerbacks in football, and Vaughn will be asked to play on the outside.

Vaughn is the 15th member of Notre Dame’s 2016 signing class. He is the fifth defensive back, joining safeties D.J. Morgan, Jalen Elliott and Spencer Perry along with cornerback Julian Love. The Irish project to take one more.

With Notre Dame expecting another huge recruiting weekend with USC coming to town, it’ll be very interesting to see how the Irish staff close out this recruiting class.