Alabama wide receiver Cooper celebrates after scoring a touchdown in the fourth quarter during the NCAA SEC college football championship in Atlanta.

And in that corner… The Alabama Crimson Tide


MIAMI BEACH, Fla. — Are we ready yet? After 40 days, there’s little to discuss that hasn’t already be covered for the past few weeks. But before we call no joy, it is worth at least discussing the very real difference that comes along with beach in South Florida right now. Just about every Alabama fan in town completely expects Notre Dame to get throttled.

Of course, on a night like tonight, optimism reigns supreme. When a guy like Mike Golic decides to cast away ESPN and play the role of Irish cheerleader, you know things are good. But for thousands of Irish fans,  being at the pep rally, listening to the Irish marching band, and hearing inspirational words from guys like actor Martin Short, Pat Terrell, Tony Rice, and Lou Holtz makes some sense.

Looking for the opposite perspective, I tracked down Don Kausler Jr., writer for the team of newspapers. Don and his crew have been spitting out stories just about on the hour since they arrived in Fort Lauderdale, so getting his perspective on the proceedings would be critical.

After pumping out a few thousand words, I asked questions and Don thankfully gave the answers.


1. Most Notre Dame fans watched Alabama dismantle Michigan to open the season and slide by Georgia with a tremendous comeback in the SEC Championship. How good is this team? Could they be as good as the team that had five players drafted in the first 35 picks?

This is a very good team, maybe a great team, but it has a few flaws. The offense sometimes disappears in third quarters, but it has set a single-season school record with 500 points. The defense has four shutouts, and the first-team defense held two other opponents to no points, but LSU, Texas A&M and Georgia found ways to move the ball and score. It’s easier to throw than to run on this defense, and the Crimson Tide has been vulnerable to mobile quarterbacks. It contained the running of Michigan’s Denard Robinson, but he connected on two long passes. LSU’s Zach Mettenberger completed 24-35 passes for 298 yards and one touchdown. Georgia’s Aaron Murray completed 18-33 passes for 265 yards and one touchdown.

2. It appears that the Crimson Tide are battling a few injuries to some key players. How are Barrett Jones and Jesse Williams healing? How important are they to Alabama’s success?

Both have healed. Williams never missed practicing time. He has worn a brace on his sprained knee. Jones missed Alabama’s first nine postseason practices while recovering from a sprained foot. Both will start. Will either one play at 100 percent? That remains to be seen. Williams probably will be used only in situations where running is anticipated. Jones played essentially on one leg for three quarters in the SEC Championship Game, and he helped Alabama rush for 350 yards.

3. Notre Dame enters the national title game undefeated and ranked first in the nation, yet they’re decided underdogs. How does Nick Saban and the Alabama staff view Notre Dame’s personnel? Does it match-up to the SEC’s best?

 Saban and Alabama players have had nothing but great things to say about Notre Dame’s personnel. We’ve heard many comparisons between the Fighting Irish and SEC teams. Some Alabama players have said Notre Dame’s defense reminds them of Georgia’s star-studded unit that features three probable NFL first-round draft picks.

4. It looks like it’ll be strength vs. strength on January 7th when Alabama’s offensive line takes on Notre Dame’s front seven. Any individual match-up worth keeping a closer eye on?

Definitely keep an eye in the middle, where Alabama center Barrett Jones and Notre Dame nose guard Louis Nix III will battle. Alabama loves to run inside-zone plays, and if Jones can handle Nix solo, guards Chance Warmack and Anthony Steen will be able to block linebackers. If not, look for double teams, and Notre Dame linebackers might be able to clog running lanes.

5. Skill-wise, Notre Dame hasn’t faced a team with talent like Alabama. Irish fans know about the two-headed monster of Eddie Lacy and TJ Yeldon. Who else should they be worried about?

Freshman wide receiver Amari Cooper is dynamic and has emerged as a deep threat in recent games. Junior quarterback AJ McCarron is a savvy leader who seldom makes mistakes (26 TD passes vs. 3 interceptions). He is particularly dangerous on play-action passes that usually are set up by success on the ground. If Notre Dame pays too much attention to stopping Alabama’s running game, McCarron could make the Irish pay with passes. He will take what the defense gives up.

6. One issue that seems to stay below the mainstream radar is Oversigning. From 2008-12, the Tide signed 32 + 27 + 26 + 22 + 26 players, making the management of 85 scholarships difficult. Saban spoke delicately about the issue last year. Has anything changed in the SEC? Can you attribute some of the SEC’s dominance to the conference’s propensity to sign oversized recruiting classes?

Saban has gotten some grief, and he’s sensitive to the criticism, but he plays within the rules. Those rules changed in 2011. The SEC reduced the number of players a school can sign in one year from 28 to 25. “Back counting” is allowed for early enrollees if the program is under the 85-scholarship limit. Saban has offered some players “grayshirts,” meaning they sit out the fall semester and enroll in the spring. Skeptics say Saban engages in “roster management.” He says players create their own exits. That is, some leave because they don’t want to sit on Alabama’s bench. Some leave because they aren’t making good grades. Some are offered medical scholarships if they no longer are healthy enough to play. Ultimately, room typically is made for a maximum number of signees each year.


Special thanks to Don for getting me answers in a really busy week. For more, check out his Twitter feed and check out’s coverage of the national championship.

Evaluating VanGorder’s scheme against the option

ANNAPOLIS, MD - SEPTEMBER 19:  Keenan Reynolds #19 of the Navy Midshipmen rushes for his fifth touchdown in the fourth quarter against the East Carolina Pirates during their 45-21 win on September 19, 2015 in Annapolis, Maryland.  (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

Notre Dame’s ability to slow down Georgia Tech’s vaunted option attack served as one of the high points to the Irish’s early season success. After spending a considerable amount of offseason energy towards attacking the option and learning more, watching the Irish hold the Yellow Jackets in check was a huge victory for Brian VanGorder, Bob Elliott and the rest of Notre Dame’s staff.

But it was only half the battle.

This weekend, Keenan Reynolds and Navy’s veteran offense come to town looking to wreak some havoc on a defense that’s struggled to slow it down. And after getting a look at some of the new tricks the Irish had in store for Paul Johnson, Ken Niumatalolo and his offensive coaches have likely started plotting their counterpunches days in advance.

How did Notre Dame’s defense slow down Georgia Tech? Brian Kelly credited an aggressive game plan and continually changing looks. So while some were quick to wonder whether Notre Dame’s scheme changes were the biggest piece of the puzzle, it’s interesting to see how the Irish’s strategic decisions looked from the perspective of an option expert.

Over at “The Birddog” blog, Michael James utilizes his spread option expertise and takes a look at how the Irish defended Georgia Tech. His conclusion:

Did the Irish finally figure out the magic formula that will kill this gimmick high school offense for good?

Not exactly.

The Irish played a fairly standard 4-3 for a large chunk of the game. James thought Notre Dame’s move to a 3-5-3 was unique, though certainly not the first time anybody’s used that alignment.

But what stood out wasn’t necessarily the Xs and Os, but rather how much better Notre Dame’s personnel reacted to what they were facing.

Again, from the Birddog Blog:

The real story here, and what stood out to me when watching Notre Dame play Georgia Tech, was how much faster the Irish played compared to past years. I don’t mean that they are more athletic, although this is considered to be the best Notre Dame team in years. I mean that they reacted far more quickly to what they saw compared to what they’ve done in the past.

Usually, when a team plays a spread option offense, one of the biggest challenges that defensive coordinators talk about is replicating the offense’s speed and precision. It’s common to hear them say that it takes a series or two to adjust. That was most certainly not the case here.

James referenced our Media Day observations and seemed impressed by the decision to bring in walk-on Rob Regan to captain what’s now known as the SWAG team. And while VanGorder’s reputation as a mad scientist had many Irish fans wondering if the veteran coordinator cooked something up that hadn’t been seen, it was more a trait usually associated with Kelly that seems to have made the biggest difference.

“It wasn’t that the game plan was so amazing (although it was admittedly more complex and aggressive than we’ve seen out of other Notre Dame teams),” James wrote. “It was plain ol’ coachin’ ’em up.

“Notre Dame’s players were individually more prepared for what they’d see. Notre Dame is already extremely talented, but talented and prepared? You can’t adjust for that. That’s more challenging for Navy than any game plan.”

Irish prepared to take on the best Navy team in years


Brian Kelly opens every Tuesday press conference with compliments for an opponent. But this week, it was easy to see that his kind words for Navy were hardly lip service.

Ken Niumatalolo will bring his most veteran—and probably his most talented—group of Midshipmen into Notre Dame Stadium, looking to hand the Irish their first loss in the series since Kelly’s debut season in South Bend.

“Ken Niumatalolo has done an incredible job in developing his program and currently carrying an eight-game winning streak,” Kelly said. “I voted for them in USA Today Top 25 as a top-25 team. I think they’ve earned that. But their defense as well has developed. It’s played the kind of defense that I think a top 25 team plays.”

With nine months of option preparation, Notre Dame needs to feel confident about their efforts against Georgia Tech. Then again, the Midshipmen saw that game plan and likely have a few tricks in store.

As much as the Irish have focused their efforts on stopping Keenan Reynolds and the triple-option, Navy’s much-improved defense is still looking for a way to slow down a team that’s averaged a shade over 48 points a game against them the last four seasons.

Niumatalolo talked about that when asked about slowing down Will Fuller and Notre Dame’s skill players, an offense that’s averaged over 48 points a game during this four-game win streak.

“We’ve got to try our best to keep [Fuller] in front of us, that’s easier said than done,” Niumatalolo said. “We’ve got to play as close as we can without their guys running past us. I’ve been here a long time and we’re still trying to figure out how to do that.”


Navy heads to South Bend unbeaten, defeating former Irish defensive coordinator Bob Diaco‘s team just two Saturdays ago. And while Diaco raised a few eyebrows when he said Navy would be the team’s toughest test of the year (they already played a ranked Missouri team), the head of the UConn program couldn’t have been more effusive in his praise.

“I have been competing against Navy for some time and this is the best Navy team I have seen for, let’s say the last half-dozen years,” UConn coach Bob Diaco told the New Haven Register. “I could click on footage from three years ago and see a lion’s share of players who are playing right now in the game as freshmen and sophomores. They have a veteran group, a strong group, a talented group and they look like the stiffest competition among our first four opponents.”

As usual, there will be those who look at this game as the breather between Clemson and USC. That won’t be anybody inside The Gug. So as the Irish try to get back to their winning ways in front of a home crowd, a complete team effort is needed.

“I’ll take a win by one,” Kelly said Tuesday. “That would be fine with me.”