Rees Golson Kiel

Spring Solutions: Quarterback


It’s been a long time since Notre Dame’s quarterback position has had the type of stability that it now enjoys. So while Brian Kelly likely touted the idea that every quarterback would be competing for the starting job, you can’t blame redshirt freshman Gunner Kiel for reading the writing on the wall.

With Everett Golson returning after an impressive freshman campaign, and back-up seniors Tommy Rees and Andrew Hendrix still viable options in case the case of an injury, Kiel’s path to the starting lineup didn’t look any closer, with a source telling me that Kelly told Kiel he’d open at No. 3 heading into spring drills.

With Kiel’s high-profile departure, a few new scenarios open up. For early enrollee Malik Zaire, the starting lineup just got a whole lost closer, especially with Rees and Hendrix not long for the Irish roster after this season. And as the Irish coaching staff canvas the country for elite prep arms, a spot on the roster for a 2014 quarterback just got a whole lot more attractive.

Let’s take a look at the projected positional depth chart, and set some spring goals for the Irish quarterbacks.


1. Everett Golson, Jr.
2. Tommy Rees, Sr.
3. Andrew Hendrix, Sr.
4. Malik Zaire, Fr.


Everett Golson: There’s plenty of good to take away from Golson’s debut season. Namely, Golson’s impressive work leading the Irish to a 12-1 record, and throwing twice as many touchdowns as interceptions, no easy task for a freshman learning on the job.

Still, there were some very visible growing pains this season for the rising junior quarterback, and this spring should be the time where Kelly and offensive coordinator Chuck Martin ride Golson hard, challenging the quarterback to match his football acumen with his athleticism.

We’ve learned a few things about Golson after his first season at the helm of the Irish offense. We knew he had the arm strength needed to make every throw on the field. We also knew he had the ability to evade the pass rush, extending plays with his legs by keeping his eyes down field. And while we thought Golson would anchor a zone-read heavy running game, there’s not the top end, break-away speed at quarterback that many expected, though that hardly prohibits the Irish from utilizing Golson on the ground.

Matching up Golson’s debut season with Irish quarterbacks of the past isn’t a safe exercise. If it were the point would quickly be rendered moot. It blew the doors off of just about every first-year starter in modern history with hardly a comparable — unless you consider the unlikely debut of Matt LoVecchio.

There’s no question Golson is the quarterback of the future. But for the Irish to have another great season, they’ll need the offense not limited by its quarterback, but thriving because of him.

Tommy Rees: After a season spent vindicating himself after Irish fans put 2011’s underwhelming performance on his shoulders, Rees reframed his legacy with an incredible season in relief. Called upon in multiple high leverage situations, Rees answered the bell in each case, helping the Irish seal victories against Purdue, Michigan, Stanford, BYU, Oklahoma, and Pitt.

While his stats actually took a step backwards from his sophomore season numbers, Rees embodied the personality of the offense — a resilient player that might not have been impressively efficient, but gutted the job out and got it done.

In his final season of eligibility, expect Rees to once again be a fireman. And with Golson more at ease in the starting job, if Rees does see the field it’ll be for a very specific reason. Still, at every program, veteran leadership at the quarterback position is a valuable commodity. For Rees, that could be cashed in helping Golson in the film room, helping Zaire learn the ropes, and the offense in the clutch.

Andrew Hendrix: After losing the training camp battle for the starting job, Hendrix became the odd man out in the offense. He saw action in only a handful of games, putting together a stat line in only three games, Navy, BYU, and Wake Forest.

At this point, it’s clear what Hendrix is and what he isn’t. And while he possesses a skillset unique to the quarterback depth chart, it’s pretty clear that the offensive plans don’t include the once highly touted recruit from Cincinnati.

While Hendrix’s career might continue somewhere else in 2014, he’s not likely to go anywhere until after he receives his degree from Notre Dame. And in the meantime, with the depth chart established ahead of him, maybe there’s finally a package that can utilize the battering ram of a quarterback. Sure, the window closed on Hendrix being the next rifle armed passer at Notre Dame. But that doesn’t mean the offense can’t carve out a role for him.

Malik Zaire: This season just got a whole lot more interesting for Zaire, who no longer sees a logjam in front of him. That said, his job will likely be the same as it would’ve been with Kiel still on campus. Zaire will take part in spring drills, likely drinking from the same fire hydrant that overwhelmed Rees, Hendrix and Golson.

But that hasn’t stopped Zaire from preparing like he’s fighting for a job. The freshman is down in Arizona training with veteran teammates over spring break, forgoing time at home with his family for a few extra minutes of conditioning and drill work in the desert. It may not pay off in the short term, but it gives you a very good idea of what kind of player the Irish have waiting in the wings.

Irish add commitment from CB Donte Vaughn

Donte Vaughn

Notre Dame’s recruiting class grew on Monday. And in adding 6-foot-3 Memphis cornerback Donte Vaughn, it grew considerably.

The Irish added another jumbo-sized skill player in Vaughn, beating out a slew of SEC offers for the intriguing cover man. Vaughn picked Notre Dame over offers from Auburn, LSU, Miami, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, Tennessee and Texas A&M among others.

He made the announcement on Monday, his 18th birthday:

It remains to be seen if Vaughn can run like a true cornerback. But his length certainly gives him a skill-set that doesn’t currently exist on the Notre Dame roster.

Interestingly enough, Vaughn’s commitment comes a cycle after Brian VanGorder made news by going after out-of-profile coverman Shaun Crawford, immediately offering the 5-foot-9 cornerback after taking over for Bob Diaco, who passed because of Crawford’s size. An ACL injury cut short Crawford’s freshman season before it got started, but not before Crawford already proved he’ll be a valuable piece of the Irish secondary for years to come.

Vaughn is another freaky athlete in a class that already features British Columbia’s Chase Claypool. With a safety depth chart that’s likely turning over quite a bit in the next two seasons, Vaughn can clearly shift over if that’s needed, though Notre Dame adding length like Vaughn clearly points to some of the shifting trends after Richard Sherman went from an average wide receiver to one of the best cornerbacks in football, and Vaughn will be asked to play on the outside.

Vaughn is the 15th member of Notre Dame’s 2016 signing class. He is the fifth defensive back, joining safeties D.J. Morgan, Jalen Elliott and Spencer Perry along with cornerback Julian Love. The Irish project to take one more.

With Notre Dame expecting another huge recruiting weekend with USC coming to town, it’ll be very interesting to see how the Irish staff close out this recruiting class.




Days before facing Notre Dame, USC coach Steve Sarkisian to take leave of absence


When Notre Dame takes on rival USC on Saturday, they’ll be facing a Trojans team without a head coach. USC athletic director Pat Haden announced today that effective immediately, head coach Steve Sarkisian will be taking an indefinite leave of absence. Offensive coordinator Clay Helton will be interim head coach.

While the details are still coming into focus, multiple reports point to another incident with alcohol. Haden himself said that he made the decision after speaking with Sarkisian.

“I called Steve and talked to him. It was very clear to me that he is not healthy. I asked him to take an indefinite leave of absence,” Haden said, according to multiple Los Angeles media reports.

Sarkisian’s decision-making and alcohol use came into the spotlight this August when the head coach made inappropriate statements at a large booster event. Sarkisian addressed the media after the incident, acknowledged mixing medication with alcohol, and vowed to seek help and not to make the same mistake again.

Today’s incident appears to be a relapse, and one that requires immediate attention. Helton ran the team’s practice today and steps back into an interim head coaching role, a job he handled after the Trojans fired Lane Kiffin and Ed Orgeron left after not being awarded the permanent job.

“Fortunately or unfortunately, I have been in this situation before,” Helton said. “Once again, I’m very fortunate to have a group of first-class kids that are extremely talented and want to do something special here.”

This is the second major sports persona to leave his season to seek treatment in recent weeks. New York Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia left the team to seek treatment for alcohol issues. The Trojans are coming off an upset loss to Washington on Thursday night, losing 17-12 as a 17-point favorite.