Charlie Weis

Memorial Weekend notes: Vanderdoes, Weis, recruiting down south


With the unofficial kickoff to summer upon us, we’re inside 100 days until football is back. That may seem like quite a long time, but we’ve got plenty of ground to cover in the next few months as we get a better look at what the 2013 Fighting Irish will be.

Before everybody disappears for a long holiday weekend, let’s run through a few links that caught my attention over the past few days:


First and foremost the Eddie Vanderdoes situation continues to be confusing. A few days ago, ESPN’s Joe Schad got in on the action, tweeting the following:

Those comments spread like wild fire across the internet, with any supposed side of the story still not coming out of anyone in the Vanderdoes camp. Of course, there aren’t too many option for Vanderdoes since he signed his letter-of-intent, and it doesn’t appear Notre Dame has any intentions of letting him back out of his commitment.

Defensive line coach Mike Elston, who will handling Vanderdoes’ development on a day-to-day basis spoke about the incoming freshman defensive linemen and mentioned the bright future the staff still believes Vanderdoes has in South Bend.

“We signed an excellent class of defensive linemen,” Elston told the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette this week.

“I’m excited about coaching those guys that we signed, and Eddie being one of them. I’m excited about him reporting in June with his classmates, and I can’t wait to develop him into an excellent football player.”

Speaking to a source close to the UCLA football program, the Bruins staff believes that if it were up to Vanderdoes and his family, he’d be in Westwood come this summer. How that came to be? That’s still in question, but while the Irish have a signed letter-of-intent, don’t expect them to walk away from it.


Brian Hamilton of the Chicago Tribune did some digging into Notre Dame’s financial disclosures and came across another big payment to former Irish head coach Charlie Weis. Fired three seasons after signing a ten-year extension to coach the Irish, Weis’ lastest pay-out took him past the $10 million mark.

Here’s more from the Trib:

Weis received another buyout payment of $2,054,744 as part of the separation agreement for his firing in 2009, bringing the total amount paid to the ousted Irish coach and current Kansas head coach to nearly $10.8 million, according to federal tax documents the school provided the Tribune on Thursday.

It is the second consecutive payment of $2,054,744 to Weis after the initial payment of $6,638,403 after his firing. The university is scheduled for “additional annual payments” through Dec. 2015, so four more installments of the same $2 million-plus figure would bring the total to $18,966,867.

Other numbers of note that caught my attention is the $1.4 million Mike Brey makes and the impressive $1.14 million. that Muffet McGraw pulls in. Athletic director Jack Swarbrick made a reported $1.08 million.

If the Irish do end up paying the full ticket amount of the remaining years on Weis’ contract, former Notre Dame athletic director Kevin White should take his place among the very worst contract negotiators in all of sports.


Tyler James of the South Bend Tribune took a look at the Irish trying to reestablish a footprint in Louisiana, one of the most talent rich locations in the country. Co-defensive coordinator Kerry Cooks and recruiting coordinator and running backs coach Tony Alford are trying their best to take advantage of the Irish’s exceptional 2012 and make up some ground.

James caught up with John Curtis head coach JT Curtis, who talked about the changes in recruiting the Bayou State.

“Notre Dame recruited here a good bit in the past, but in the last five, eight, 10 years or so they really haven’t been terribly active here,” Curtis told James. “This is a little bit of a change.”

“We’ve had contact with them through the years. They’ve just never really been that actively involved,” Curtis said. “That might just be through the evaluation process. College recruiting is all about evaluation, and it’s not an easy process to go through.

It’s been almost 15 years since Notre Dame signed cornerback Albert Poree from Louisiana, only to see him transfer out after just a season. But with a return to college football’s very good (I’m not ready to say elite), taking another shot at one of the country’s most talent rich states — especially after their recent success in Georgia and the Carolinas — only makes sense.

Irish prepared to take on the best Navy team in years


Brian Kelly opens every Tuesday press conference with compliments for an opponent. But this week, it was easy to see that his kind words for Navy were hardly lip service.

Ken Niumatalolo will bring his most veteran—and probably his most talented—group of Midshipmen into Notre Dame Stadium, looking to hand the Irish their first loss in the series since Kelly’s debut season in South Bend.

“Ken Niumatalolo has done an incredible job in developing his program and currently carrying an eight-game winning streak,” Kelly said. “I voted for them in USA Today Top 25 as a top-25 team. I think they’ve earned that. But their defense as well has developed. It’s played the kind of defense that I think a top 25 team plays.”

With nine months of option preparation, Notre Dame needs to feel confident about their efforts against Georgia Tech. Then again, the Midshipmen saw that game plan and likely have a few tricks in store.

As much as the Irish have focused their efforts on stopping Keenan Reynolds and the triple-option, Navy’s much-improved defense is still looking for a way to slow down a team that’s averaged a shade over 48 points a game against them the last four seasons.

Niumatalolo talked about that when asked about slowing down Will Fuller and Notre Dame’s skill players, an offense that’s averaged over 48 points a game during this four-game win streak.

“We’ve got to try our best to keep [Fuller] in front of us, that’s easier said than done,” Niumatalolo said. “We’ve got to play as close as we can without their guys running past us. I’ve been here a long time and we’re still trying to figure out how to do that.”


Navy heads to South Bend unbeaten, defeating former Irish defensive coordinator Bob Diaco‘s team just two Saturdays ago. And while Diaco raised a few eyebrows when he said Navy would be the team’s toughest test of the year (they already played a ranked Missouri team), the head of the UConn program couldn’t have been more effusive in his praise.

“I have been competing against Navy for some time and this is the best Navy team I have seen for, let’s say the last half-dozen years,” UConn coach Bob Diaco told the New Haven Register. “I could click on footage from three years ago and see a lion’s share of players who are playing right now in the game as freshmen and sophomores. They have a veteran group, a strong group, a talented group and they look like the stiffest competition among our first four opponents.”

As usual, there will be those who look at this game as the breather between Clemson and USC. That won’t be anybody inside The Gug. So as the Irish try to get back to their winning ways in front of a home crowd, a complete team effort is needed.

“I’ll take a win by one,” Kelly said Tuesday. “That would be fine with me.”


Kelly confident Robinson will rebound

Notre Dame v Florida State

Corey Robinson‘s season was already off to a slow start. And that was before a difficult night at Clemson. The junior receiver came into last weekend with only four catches, held out against UMass after a pregame tweak of his knee put a scare into the Irish.

Robinson’s knee checked out fine. But mentally, it appears that the sure-handed junior is struggling.

Just before halftime against the Tigers, Robinson failed to reel in a long catch that would’ve given the Irish a much-needed touchdown heading into half. Early in the fourth quarter, a high throw from DeShone Kizer on the Irish’s first failed two-point conversion play slid through Robinson’s hands. Made worse was a mental mistake by Robinson, the Irish needing to use one of their second half timeouts when the junior wasn’t on the field.

Coached hard on the sideline by Brian Kelly and coached up by his position coach Mike Denbrock (as we saw on both Showtime and Fighting Irish Media’s ICON), the staff is doing it’s best to get Robinson’s confidence back.

With some wondering if Robinson’s struggles should open the door for talented freshman Equanimeous St. Brown, Kelly talked about their belief that the junior will return to form.

“Corey Robinson is going to get the job done. I had a very lengthy conversation with him yesterday,” Kelly said Tuesday. “I believe in Corey. Corey’s got to believe in himself, and he will. He’s got to go attack the football. He’s letting the football come to him. He’s letting it eat him up a little bit, but I believe in Corey.”

There’s no better place to showcase that belief than against Navy. The Midshipmen don’t have a defender physically capable of matching up with the 6-foot-5 Robinson, who will likely face his share of single coverage with Will Fuller likely demanding safety help.

Then it’s just a matter of Robinson showing the hands and confidence that made him one of last year’s most consistent performers.

“Once he starts attacking the football, I think we’re going to see somebody that can make the plays that we expect him to make,” Kelly said. “So I’m optimistic that we’re going to see the guy that we need to see on Saturday.”