Jacob Matuska

Freshman Focus: Jacob Matuska

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One of the earliest members of the ’13 recruiting class, Jacob Matuska fits the profile that Brian Kelly and his staff target perfectly. Recruited by some schools as a tight end, Matuska instead will start on the defensive side of the ball, capable of growing into a 3-4 defensive end quickly as he begins to put weight on his impressive 6-foot-5, 250-pound frame.

Targeted early by the Irish coaching staff, Matuska will get the opportunity to watch and learn from an elite defensive front. Under the tutelage of Mike Elston, Matuska should develop into another point-of-attack player that’s got plenty of athleticism for a defensive end.

Let’s take a closer look at the Columbus native.

RECRUITING PEDIGREE

Matuska isn’t among the most heralded members of the Irish recruiting class, falling outside both Rivals and 247’s top 250. At the time of his commitment, Matuska had mostly regional offers, though Big Ten programs Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Nebraska all offered.

There’s plenty to like about the player the Irish are getting, a product of an elite football program at Bishop Hartley in Columbus, Ohio. Described as a “street-fight football player” by his high school coach, it’s clear that the Irish staff quickly saw something they liked in Matuska.

“He’s going to physically get bigger and stronger,” Kelly said on Signing Day. “We just like his work ethic. We’re really excited about him as a person.  He’s going to fit in well here at Notre Dame, and another young man that really adds to the depth that we’re looking for in our program.”

EARLY PLAYING TIME OPPORTUNITIES

While the depth chart still isn’t as deep as the coaching staff wants on the defensive line, it’s difficult to picture Matuska playing too much as a true freshman. While we’ll figure out where he is physically when camp opens in August, the rotation up front behind Sheldon Day and Stephon Tuitt will likely include guys like Tony Springmann and Justin Utupo, with Jarron Jones hopefully ready to contribute after spending his freshman season drinking from the fire hose.

Where things get interesting up front is next season. While Tuitt has talked about staying for his senior season and getting his degree, his pro potential might make that decision much tougher. Add into the mix the uncertainty of Chase Hounshell’s recovery from another devastating shoulder surgery, and there’s going to be a fierce competition at defensive end in the coming seasons, with some unproven players needing to step up.

Realistically, a redshirt season might be the best thing for Matuska, learning the ropes from an All-American like Tuitt and diving into the technical aspects of line play, a requirement for Mike Elston’s troops.

PROJECTING THE FUTURE

There’s no reason to mistake Matuska as just a big body that’ll eat space up front. That’s not giving his athleticism enough credit. Take listed 40 times with a really, really big grain of salt, but most websites list Matuska in the 4.7 range. Even if that’s a pipe dream, running a sub-5.0 time along the defensive line is impressive.

What remains to be seen is if Matuska can take that athleticism and use it to develop as a pass rusher. Finding linemen that can both hold up at the point of attack and get pressure on the quarterback is key in this system and will ultimately determine whether or not Matuska becomes a prime contributor.

Life after Nix and Tuitt should be interesting for the Irish on defense. Nobody expected to see the front seven of the Irish transform so quickly during Kelly’s three seasons in South Bend, so there’s every reason to believe that this coaching staff saw and identified something they liked in Matuska quickly.

Playing at a program that dominated Jaylon Smith’s Bishop Luers team 40-7, Matuska should have the developmental tools and mindset to mix it up in the trenches. Add in a big frame and some nice athleticism, and he’s got a good future.

Irish A-to-Z: Pete Mokwuah

Pete Mokwuah247
Tom Loy / Irish247
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It didn’t take long for defensive coordinator Brian VanGorder to identify, recruit and land defensive tackle Pete Mokwuah in his first days on staff at Notre Dame. But it has taken longer for Mokwuah to see the field.

The rising junior—an almost immediate offer and commitment once VanGorder took over the defense—has been mostly a background player for the Irish, spending a season as a redshirt before only appearing briefly in 2015.

But with uncertainty in the trenches with Sheldon Day gone and the work volume of Jarron Jones a question mark, perhaps 2016 is the year for Mokwuah to begin his move into a rotation that’s sure to grow as more defenders share jobs up front.

 

PETE MOKWUAH
6’3″, 317 lbs.
Junior, No. 96, DT

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

Committed to Rutgers until Notre Dame swooped in late, the three-star prospect had mostly regional offers (UConn, Pitt, Temple) before committing to the Irish in late January, before ever stepping foot on campus.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2014): Did not see action, preserving year of eligibility.

Sophomore Season (2015): Saw action in two games (Texas, UMass) in a reserve role at defensive tackle. Did not make a tackle in limited action.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

Jones couldn’t play and Mokwuah still didn’t see the field.

As I look at the depth chart, Mokwuah’s participation likely hinges on the health of Jarron Jones. The senior defensive lineman might be a step slow coming off of foot surgery, and that would force the entire tackle position to shift down a rung.

That bad news for Notre Dame would be good news for Mokwuah’s playing time, though. But even then, he’ll be fighting a capable group of young defensive linemen for playing time, with guys like Daniel Cage and Tillery likely having a head start.

Late attention on the recruiting trail isn’t much of an indicator in ability to contribute. We saw that with Cage, who quickly moved into the rotation at nose guard. So while Mokwuah’s road to the field looks backed up, he’s got four years of eligibility remaining. And even if his contributions are limited to special teams and garbage time, getting on the field this season should be the realistic goal.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Unless there’s a breakthrough this season, Mokwuah projects mostly to be a back-up or situational player. That’s not to say he’s doomed to the bench—especially considering the lack of depth the Irish put on the field last season up front. But this season will be telling.

Mokwuah’s main asset is size and strength. At 6-foot-3 and nearly 320 pounds, he’s a load in the trenches. With Jarron Jones in his final season in the program and Daniel Cage already well established, the snaps won’t be seeking out Mokwuah, rather he’ll have to prove himself worthy to even get into the rotation.

Physically, you can see how that happens, especially if Mokwuah enters camp in great shape and ready to compete. But there’s work to be done.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

Finding a niche in 2016 would be a great step forward for Mokwuah. Ultimately, that could be five or ten snaps a game, allowing Jones and Cage to stay fresh. But it could be just being ready to be the “Next Man In,” knowing that the Irish defense desperately needs to establish some type of productive rotation to allow their young talent a chance to flourish at the point of attack.

Three seasons into his time in South Bend, Mokwuah should be ready to compete physically. It’s also his second year working with Keith Gilmore. But nose guard is a difficult depth chart to crack, and Mokwuah’s chances of seeing the field might hinge on the rotation established to take the load off of Jerry Tillery at three-technique.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg
Jalen Elliott
Nicco Feritta
Tarean Folston
Mark Harrell
Daelin Hayes
Jay Hayes
Tristen Hoge
Corey Holmes
Torii Hunter Jr.
Alizé Jones
Jamir Jones
Jarron Jones
Jonathan Jones
Tony Jones Jr.
Khalid Kareem
DeShone Kizer
Julian Love
Tyler Luatua
Cole Luke
Greer Martini
Jacob Matuska
Mike McGlinchey
Colin McGovern
Deon McIntosh
Javon McKinley

Irish A-to-Z: Javon McKinley

Javon McKinleyRIVALS
Rivals / Yahoo Sports
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If it’s possible to fly under the radar as an elite incoming recruit, Javon McKinley is doing it. One of California’s most prolific receivers in history—putting up monster numbers in one of the state’s most competitive conferences—McKinley now steps onto campus at Notre Dame with a depth chart filled with uncertainty.

McKinley’s big, strong and polished. That’s usually a good thing for a young skill player. While freshmen have come along slowly under Brian Kelly at receiver, the head coach has a trio of freshman newcomers who will test that theory immediately.

 

JAVON MCKINLEY
6’3″, 205 lbs.
Freshman, WR

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A consensus 4-star recruit, McKinley was a U.S. Army All-American, a multi-season selection on the LA Times’ All-Area first-team, the 2014 All-Area Back of the Year, and 2014 Southern Section 5 Player of the Year.

He had offers from USC, UCLA, Oregon, Stanford, Arizona State, and Ohio State before picking Notre Dame.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Until we see him, let’s just call McKinley’s potential incredibly intriguing. I made the physical comparison around Signing Day to Michael Floyd, and that might be setting McKinley up for failure. (Especially with people knowing how I feel about MMF as a player.) But as a ready-made physical specimen, McKinley can do just about everything, and we’ve already seen him do it against high end high school competition.

That said, dominating at the high school level with his size is different than understanding how to do that in the college game. And we’ll need to see just how good McKinley’s speed is—Floyd ended up being Notre Dame’s most prolific receiver in history because of his physicality and because he had sneaky-good speed that allowed him to run behind defensive backs.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I think McKinley’s too good to keep off the field. But I also think his freshman ceiling will be in line with the better of Brian Kelly’s young receivers, so I’m still going to put a cap on his season totals around 15-20 catches. (True freshman TJ Jones had 23 grabs, when Notre Dame’s receiving depth chart was essentially empty.)

What does that mean for the future? Nothing. We saw Will Fuller go from zero-to-sixty when he went from freshman to sophomore season. We saw Kelly feed the football to Michael Floyd when his offense needed it. Kelly will do what the offense needs to score points.

If McKinley were the early enrollee, I think all of us would’ve been buzzing about him instead of Stepherson. And those 15 practices might be enough to give Stepherson the nod over McKinley, though the latter is far more game-ready from a physicality standpoint.

Regardless, Notre Dame’s young receivers—Stepherson, McKinley and Chase Claypool—might be the most exciting incoming class at a position that I’ve seen in my time covering the Irish. so while it’s still too early to say it, McKinley could be the best of the bunch.

 

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg
Jalen Elliott
Nicco Feritta
Tarean Folston
Mark Harrell
Daelin Hayes
Jay Hayes
Tristen Hoge
Corey Holmes
Torii Hunter Jr.
Alizé Jones
Jamir Jones
Jarron Jones
Jonathan Jones
Tony Jones Jr.
Khalid Kareem
DeShone Kizer
Julian Love
Tyler Luatua
Cole Luke
Greer Martini
Jacob Matuska
Mike McGlinchey
Colin McGovern
Deon McIntosh

 

Irish A-to-Z: Deon McIntosh

Deon McIntosh
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As part of Notre Dame’s two running back recruiting haul, freshman Deon McIntosh arrives on campus with a skill-set fairly unique to the runners in Autry Denson’s backfield. A prolific junior in Florida football hotbed Broward County, McIntosh is the closest thing to a scatback Brian Kelly has recruited.

Dubbed the “lightning” to classmate Tony Jones’s “thunder,” now McIntosh needs to find a role in the Irish offense, capable of playing in the slot or being utilized on special teams. While we won’t see what the Irish have in McIntosh until he’s given a shot to compete with Tarean Folston, Josh Adams and a very talented position group, McIntosh is another skill player brought in by this coaching staff with zero intention of waiting his turn.

 

DEON MCINTOSH
5’11”, 180 lbs.
Freshman, RB

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A three-star recruit, McIntosh was the second all-time leading scorer at Cardinal Gibbons. He was ranked the No. 18 player in Broward County by the Miami Herald and had offers from Miami, Tennessee, North Carolina, and West Virginia.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

A 180-pound running back needs to do a few things that are extraordinary to survive at that size and we’ll find out if that’s what McIntosh can do when we finally see him in action at the college level. But until then, you can probably put his ceiling somewhere below elite, unless the Irish have pulled in another hidden gem.

Versatility will also be key for McIntosh. If he’s able to play in the slot, there’s less of a backup there than behind a very competitive three-deep at running back.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I’m struggling to find a way for McIntosh to see the field this season unless he turns some heads during fall camp. Finding carries for Dexter Williams is hard enough. How someone behind Williams, Folston and Adams gets touches is beyond me.

That said, McIntosh’s time at Notre Dame will be defined by his patience and what he does when he finally gets a chance. Pulling talented football players out of Fort Lauderdale isn’t easy. Neither is keeping them in South Bend if they aren’t seeing the field.

Denson raved about McIntosh’s game on and off the field during Signing Day festivities. We’ll see how the young coach’s first crop of backs perform once they’re on campus.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg
Jalen Elliott
Nicco Feritta
Tarean Folston
Mark Harrell
Daelin Hayes
Jay Hayes
Tristen Hoge
Corey Holmes
Torii Hunter Jr.
Alizé Jones
Jamir Jones
Jarron Jones
Jonathan Jones
Tony Jones Jr.
Khalid Kareem
DeShone Kizer
Julian Love
Tyler Luatua
Cole Luke
Greer Martini
Jacob Matuska
Mike McGlinchey
Colin McGovern

2018 LB Ovie Oghoufo commits to Notre Dame

Oghoufo Rivals
Rivals / Yahoo Sports
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Notre Dame’s recruiting momentum continues to build as linebacker Ovie Oghoufo is the latest commitment to the Irish program. An incredible fifth member of the 2018 class, Oghoufo made the news official on Friday, picking the Irish over Michigan, Michigan State, Boston College, Kentucky and a handful of other early offers.

The Farmington, Michigan native made the news official via Twitter and also spoke with Irish247’s Tom Loy about the decision. Oghoufo was offered earlier in the summer and was on campus again this week.

 

Give current freshman Khalid Kareem an assist for landing the 6-foot-3, 210-pound linebacker, who spent his visit in South Bend hearing from the fellow Michigander about the virtues of attending Notre Dame.

Irish247’s Tom Loy has the scoop.

“He’s practically my brother,” Oghoufo told Irish 247 of his relationship with Kareem. “I spent basically the whole day with him when I went up there for camp. We reunited. It was a great time with him. When we talked, he told me that if I go to Notre Dame, it’s a 40-year decision, not just a four-year decision. He says the caches are the best and the opportunities are great.”

That Oghoufo worked out for coaches says quite a bit about the early offer and commitment. This is a linebacker who hasn’t played his junior season of high school football yet, but was incredibly productive as a sophomore at Harrison High School.

Oghoufo joins quarterback Phil Jurkovec, running back Markese Stepp, and front seven defenders Jayson and Justin Ademilola in the 2018 class.