tj-jones

Weekend notes: Assistants, Sharks, Rees talk (and more!)

125 Comments

With breaking news and information at a minimum with the Irish a little more than a week out before training camp, it’s been a while since we took a stroll through the links and kept you guys updated on things I found interesting. (Take that for what it’s worth…)

One great thing about the past week has been the slew of media days for college football and the opening of NFL training camps. Turning on your favorite sports channel has never been better with football taking center stage and the dog days of baseball season getting temporarily put on the back burner.

Taking a quick run through the NFL, let’s check in on a few former Irish players now playing on Sundays.

* Manti Te’o now has the most popular rookie jersey in the NFL, seemingly a good sign that Chargers fans are more interested in putting Catfishing behind them and the team’s linebacking crew in front of them.

In Te’o’s case, he’s been a model rookie teammate, as just about everyone that followed Te’o for the past four years would expect. He’s taken to teammate and fellow inside linebacker Donald Butler, a former Washington Husky, and the duo could form one of the best, young combos in the NFL.

All-pro teammate Eric Weddle had this to say about Te’o’s early days with the Chargers.

“He’s eager to learn, extremely talented, instincts are off the charts, obviously, that’s why we brought him in,” Weddle told the AP. “Reminds me of myself in a lot of ways, in the way he recognizes plays and is in the right spot. Biggest thing for him is just consistency, continuing to learn, take what the coaches tell him, along with us as players, give him little tidbits as we see, and just take it, embrace it, have fun with it.”

* Meanwhile, Te’o’s best buddy Robby Toma signed a free agent contract with the Arizona Cardinals and will fight for a roster spot as a slot receiver in a depth chart that includes former Irish star Michael Floyd.

After a quiet rookie season, Floyd looks like a candidate to breakout in his second season in the NFL. Bucky Brooks of NFL.com points to Floyd as one of the most improved players for 2013 in Bruce Arians’ new offensive system.

For Floyd, the shift to a vertical passing game will accentuate his strengths as a big-bodied receiver with strong hands. He excels at shielding defenders away from the ball and high-pointing passes in traffic. Given those traits, Palmer should throw plenty of passes in Floyd’s direction to take advantage of his huge catch radius. The video clip to your right, from Floyd’s brilliant Week 17 outing against the San Francisco 49ers (eight catches for 166 yards and a touchdown), illustrates how the receiver uses his size and strength to come down with 50-50 balls.

* Last update is on former Irish center John Sullivan, who has quietly become one of the top centers in the NFL. After a harrowing senior season in South Bend saw Sullivan struggle with shotgun snaps as he teamed with one of the least experienced offensive lines in recent memory, Sullivan took over for Matt Birk as the Vikings center and is now viewed by many as the top center in the game.

Grantland’s Robert Mays did a nice job writing up Sullivan for Grantland’s All-22 All-Star team and got this quote from Vikings offensive line coach Jeff Davidson, echoing the sentiments of the staff that had Sullivan during his Notre Dame days.

“He’s really smart, I’m talking exceptionally smart,” Davidson told Grantland. “By the time we get to Sundays, he knows what all 11 guys are doing on every play. I don’t think there are many guys you can say that about, except the quarterback. I think that’s what truly sets him apart.”

Now, on to some stories about the current Irish roster:

***

While Irish fans still wait for an official announcement of a contract extension for head coach Brian Kelly, Blue & Gold Illustrated continues to release tidbits from a sit down with athletic director Jack Swarbrick.

And while Swarbrick continues to stress that a Kelly contract will get done sooner than later, it does appear that the Irish assistant coaches got a much deserved bump in their contracts as well as some other perks that kept the coaching staff in tact.

This from BGI’s conversation with Swarbrick:

One common complaint among former head coaches at Notre Dame is that they didn’t have the money to hang on to high quality assistants. Despite interest from several other teams, the Irish were able to keep its full 10-man staff intact this offseason. Swarbrick said that was an important focus for him and Kelly.

To get there Swarbrick said he loosened the purse strings to stay competitive with other top tier programs. He also said the assistants have more opportunities to add responsibilities and prepare for a future head coaching career than they have in the past.

“Certainly you have to respond to the market, and that’s an element of it, but it’s broader than that,” he said. “It’s about the level of engagement and responsibility you give them. Reinforcing the message that you are prepared to do whatever you can to help them achieve career objectives. Those are all pieces of it.”

***

With the Irish football team in South Bend for much of the summer attending summer school, senior TJ Jones managed to sneak out for a few days and prepare for life after football. For Jones, that meant swimming with sharks. Literally.

While some have talked about Jones and a future in TV, film or radio (another form of swimming with sharks), Jones took a trip to Tampa and the Florida Aquarium for a chance to shadow a group of marine biologists and get a closer look at what a career like that would be like.

FIDM had video on their Watch ND channel:

***

***

Lastly, our friend the Subway Domer has a few good interview transcripts up on his website from Steve Herring and his TNNDN podcast. Herring caught up with former Irish quarterbacks Evan Sharpley and Matt Mulvey about what to expect from Tommy Rees‘ senior season.

You can hear the interviews or read them here (Mulvey) and here (Sharpley), but I’ve clipped two excerpts that I found interesting.

First from Mulvey, who spent time as Everett Golson’s road roommate during his final season on the roster, and had this to say about Golson’s future with the Irish:

“He’s a warrior, he’s gonna battle and do whatever it takes to come back,” Mulvey told Herring. “I do believe he’s going to come back and finish his eligibility at Notre Dame. They’re not gonna hand him the starting role … he’s going to pick up where he was advancing from this spring, retake over this offense and make great strides.”

And this on the offensive game plan with Rees at the helm.

“Chuck Martin will have to show his versatility. With Tommy (before) we saw a lot of formations, motions, and actions in the backfield that gives 1-on-1 advantages that Tommy is so good at reading … I think they’ll be more precise plays and clear guys we want to go to with a favorable matchup … I think Chuck’s mind and creativity with formations will be key in where we put guys like George Atkinson and other skill positions on the field.”

Now, from Sharpley’s comments:

“You’ve seen him come in last year in key situations – and being a former quarterback I know when he’s changing a play based on the look he’s getting – that he helps the receivers and backs … you need to trust a guy like Tommy is gonna put you in the best situation.

“I really feel that with a guy like Tommy at the helm he’s gonna put you in the best play possible to have a winning opportunity.”

 

 

Sheldon Day drafted in 4th round by Jaguars

North Carolina v Notre Dame
Getty
4 Comments

Former Notre Dame captain Sheldon Day didn’t have to wait long on Saturday to hear his name called. The Indianapolis native, All-American, and the Irish’s two-time defensive lineman of the year was pick number 103, the fourth pick of the fourth round on Saturday afternoon.

Day was the seventh Irish player drafted, following first rounders Ronnie Stanley and Will Fuller, second round selections Jaylon Smith and Nick Martin, and third rounders KeiVarae Russell and C.J. Prosise.

Day has a chance to contribute as he joins the 24th-ranked defense in the league. Joining a draft class heavy on defensive players—Jalen Ramsey, Myles Jack and Yannick Ngakoue already picked ahead of him—the front seven will also include last year’s No. 3 overall pick Dante Fowler, who missed the entire season with a knee injury.

Scouted by the Jaguars at the Senior Bowl, Day doesn’t necessarily have the size to be a traditional defensive tackle. But under Gus Bradley’s attacking system (Bradley coordinated the Seahawks defense for four seasons), Day will find a niche and a role in a young defense that’s seen a heavy investment the past two years.

Smith, Martin, Russell and Prosise all drafted Friday night

INDIANAPOLIS, IN - SEPTEMBER 13: William Fuller #7 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish and Nick Martin #72 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish celebrate a touchdown during the game against the Purdue Boilermakers at Lucas Oil Stadium on September 13, 2014 in Indianapolis, Indiana.  (Photo by Michael Hickey/Getty Images)
5 Comments

Jaylon Smith, Nick Martin, KeiVarae Russell and C.J. Prosise were all selected on Friday, with four Irish teammates taken on the second night of the NFL Draft. As mentioned, Smith came off the board at pick 34, with the Cowboys gambling on the injured knee of the Butkus Award winner. Nick Martin was selected at pick 50, joining former teammate Will Fuller in Houston.

The third round saw Russell and Prosise come off the board, with Kansas City jumping on the confident cornerback and the Seahawks taking Notre Dame’s breakout running back. It capped off a huge night for the Irish with Sheldon Day, one of the more productive football players in college football, still on the board for teams to pick.

Here’s a smattering of instant reactions from the immediate aftermath.

 

 

Jaylon Smith goes to Dallas with 34th pick

PITTSBURGH, PA - NOVEMBER 07:  Jaylon Smith #9 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish celebrates by wearing the hat of team mascot, Lucky The Leprechaun, following their 42-30 win against the Pittsburgh Panthers at Heinz Field on November 7, 2015 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)
Getty
9 Comments

Jaylon Smith’s nightmare is over.

After watching his football life thrown into chaos with a career-altering knee injury, Smith came off the board after just two picks in the second round, selected by the Dallas Cowboys with the 34th pick. His selection ended the most challenging months of Smith’s young life, and come after cashing in a significant tax-free, loss-of-value insurance policy that’ll end up being just shy of a million dollars.

No, it’s not top-five money like Smith could’ve expected if he didn’t get hurt. But Smith isn’t expected to play in 2016.

And while there was a pre-draft fascination that focused on the doom and gloom more than the time-consuming recovery, it’s worth pointing out that Dallas’ medical evaluation comes from the source—literally. After all, it was the Cowboys team doctor, Dr. Dan Cooper, who performed the surgery to repair Smith’s knee.

Smith joins Ezekiel Elliott with the Cowboys, arguably the two best position players in the draft. While he might not be available in 2016, Smith will be under the supervision of the Cowboys’ medical staff, paid a seven-figure salary to get healthy with the hopes that he’ll be back to his All-American self sooner than later, especially as the nerve in his knee returns to full functionality.

Will Fuller brings his game-changing skills to the Texans offense

PITTSBURGH, PA - NOVEMBER 07: Will Fuller #7 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish catches a pass before running into the endzone for a touchdown in the second quarter in front of Avonte Maddox #14 of the Pittsburgh Panthers during the game at Heinz Field on November 7, 2015 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)
Getty
2 Comments

In all the weeks and months leading up to the NFL Draft, one key tidbit linking Will Fuller to the Houston Texans never seemed to come up. The relationship between Brian Kelly and Bill O’Brien.

The two coaches share a high school alma mater, a friendship that made the due diligence on Notre Dame’s prolific playmaker easy. And it was clear that after all their research, Houston was aggressive in their pursuit of Fuller, trading up to make Notre Dame’s All-American the second receiver off the board, triggered a run at the position.

“He was a guy that we felt strongly about,” Texans general manager Rick Smith told the team’s official website. “We didn’t want to take a chance on not getting him. We were aggressive. We went and made the move.”

That move made Fuller’s decision to leave Notre Dame after three seasons a good one. While it’ll require the Irish to rebuild at a position where Fuller served as one of college football’s best home run hitters, it gives Houston a vertical threat that can extend the top of a defense for a Texans offense that was serious about finding some solutions for a team already in the playoff mix.

Yes, Fuller has work to do. Completing the easy catch is one big area. But for all the pre-draft talk about his limitations, Brian Kelly took on some of the criticism head-on when talking with the Texans’ media reporter.

“Some people have compared him to Teddy Ginn, that’s not fair. He can catch the ball vertically like nobody I’ve coached in 25 years,” Kelly said (a sentiment some hack also laid out). Teddy Ginn is a very good player, but this is a different kind of player. If you throw the ball deep, he’s going to catch the football.”

Fuller is never going to be the biggest receiver on the field. But while most of the banter on his game focused on the negative or his deep ball skills, expect Fuller to find a role not just running deep but unleashed in the screen game as well. After the Texans spent huge on quarterback Brock Osweiler and have invested in fellow Philadelphia native and 2015 third-round pick Jaelen Strong, Fuller wasn’t selected for the future but rather expected to be a day-one piece of the puzzle.

“This will change the speed on offense immediately,” Kelly said. “It was not ‘Hey, let’s wait a couple of years’. It was ‘Let’s go get this right now’ and I think Will will do that for them.”