Matt Cashore - USA Today

Irish A-to-Z: Jarron Jones


To say that Jarron Jones was on a disappointing trajectory early in his career would be an understatement. While the monstrous defensive end looked the part of physical specimen, he struggled from the start of his Notre Dame career, needing every minute of his redshirt freshman season to just get up to the speed of college football.

Jones spent two frustrating springs trying to learn how to play defensive end like Bob Diaco and Mike Elston wanted, but even with the prototype size and strength, he wasn’t all that close to playing at a position that desperately could have used him.

But Jones’ career in South Bend was transformed… out of necessity. After injuries to Louis Nix and Kona Schwenke, it was Jones who became the next man in at defensive tackle, and after sliding inside and anchoring the interior of the Irish defensive line, Jones seemed to have found his home, even if by accident.

A strong performance against BYU, where he made seven tackles on Senior Day, gave Notre Dame hope for the future. He continued to play well to close out the season, giving the Irish at least one answer for who would fill Nix’s prodigious shoes.

It won’t be one man’s job to do that, especially as the Irish transition to a four-man front in Brian VanGorder’s new scheme. But Jones will play a key role for the Irish up front in 2014.

Let’s take a closer look at Notre Dame’s starting defensive tackle.


6’5.5″ 310 lbs.
Junior, No. 94



Jones was an Army All-American, a Top 200 player and at times flirted with a true blue-chip recruiting grade. He had offers from elite schools — Alabama, Auburn, Florida, Florida State, Michigan and Ohio State — but chose Notre Dame before his senior year began.

Jones didn’t perform all that well in San Antonio at the Army All-American game, part of the reason that he dropped in Rivals’ late rankings. But that didn’t keep Notre Dame from collecting a big bodied, athletic player.

“Jarron is one of those young men when you talk about defensive linemen, you want to look toward their athletic ability,” head coach Brian Kelly said on Signing Day. “I got a chance to see him play basketball, an incredible athlete at 6‑6, 290 pounds, and he still hasn’t developed yet. His ceiling is so high relative to strength and work volume.”



Freshman Season (2012): Did not see action.

Sophomore Season (2013): Appeared in 12 games, making one start against Stanford. Had 20 total tackles on the season, including a sack against Rutgers in the Pinstripe Bowl. Played his best game against BYU, where he made seven tackles and blocked a fourth quarter field goal. That was one of two kicks Jones blocked in 2013, the other coming against Temple. He also forced a fumble against Navy.



To borrow a coaching term, the arrow is pointing up for Jones. After struggling on the edge of the Irish defense, Jones seems to have found a home on the interior of the defensive line. As a player that’s already shown an ability to be disruptive in his limited snaps, Irish fans should be excited to see what Jones can do in VanGorder’s attacking system.

If you are looking for an area where Jones should make the biggest improvement, it’s from a strength and technique perspective. There is still plenty of work Jones can do to reshape his body, and there’s no reason that he shouldn’t be among the tougher defensive linemen in the country to move off the point of attack. Jones is also just barely scratching the surface as a defensive lineman, with Elston still molding him into the player he can be.

With three years of eligibility remaining, Jones essentially turned his career around in the month of November last season. That’s what a little confidence can do for a player that’s already physically gifted.



I’m expecting a big season from Jones, who will still be learning on the go, but has all the physical traits you’d want in a front-line defensive line starter. If there’s one thing that has me most excited about Jones is the maturity that seems to have found him. A conversation I had with him after the BYU game had Jones taking responsibility for the lack of impact he’d made so far in his college career.

“Just me being young and not focused,” Jones said last November. “It was all over the place. It was in the classroom, it was also just me in general, I kinda saw myself like, ‘Where’s my life going?’ That’s when I kind of realized I needed to tighten the screw a lot.”

Maturity helps. So does an advantageous scheme. Jones is a better fit playing in the A-gap as opposed to having to play the traditional nose guard position that Nix did. And he’ll have a big responsibility in the Irish defense, wreaking havoc up front and freeing up Joe Schmidt, Nyles Morgan or Jarrett Grace to make tackles from the Mike linebacker spot.

When Kelly and the Irish coaching staff landed Jones as a recruit, he looked like the next in line as the Irish successfully reeled in blue-chip defensive linemen after a decade of struggles. It may have taken a little bit longer for the lightbulb to go on, but Jones seems back on the right track.


The Irish A-to-Z
Josh Atkinson
Nicky Baratti
Alex Bars
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Justin Brent
Kyle Brindza
Chris Brown
Jalen Brown
Greg Bryant
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Amir Carlisle
Austin Collinsworth
Ben Councell
Scott Daly
Sheldon Day
Michael Deeb
Steve Elmer
Matthias Farley
Tarean Folston
Everett Golson
Jarrett Grace
Conor Hanratty
Eilar Hardy
Mark Harrell
Jay Hayes
Matt Hegarty
Mike Heuerman
Kolin Hill
Corey Holmes
Chase Hounshell
Torii Hunter Jr.

Even amidst chaos, Kelly expecting USC’s best

JuJu Smith-Schuster, Rocky Hayes, Blaise Taylor

USC head coach Steve Sarkisian was fired on Monday, with interim head coach Clay Helton taking the reins of the Trojan program during tumultuous times. Helton will be the fourth different USC head coach to face Notre Dame in as many years, illustrative of the chaos that’s shaken up Heritage Hall in the years since Pete Carroll left for the NFL.

All eyes are on the SC program, with heat on athletic director Pat Haden and the ensuing media circus that only Los Angeles can provide. But Brian Kelly doesn’t expect anything but their best when USC boards a plane to take on the Irish in South Bend.

While the majority of Notre Dame’s focus will be inward this week, Kelly did take the time on Sunday and Monday to talk with his team about the changes atop the Trojan program, and how they’ll likely impact the battle for the Jeweled Shillelagh.

“We talked about there would be an interim coach, and what that means,” Kelly said. “Teams come together under those circumstances and they’re going to play their very best. And I just reminded them of that.”

While nobody on this Notre Dame roster has experienced a coaching change, they’ve seen their share of scrutiny. The Irish managed to spring an upset not many saw coming against LSU last year in the Music City Bowl after a humiliating defeat against the Trojans and amidst the chaos of a quarterbacking controversy. And just last week, we saw Charlie Strong’s team spring an upset against arch rival Oklahoma when just about everybody left the Longhorns for dead.

“I think you look at the way Texas responded this past weekend with a lot of media scrutiny,” Kelly said Tuesday. “I expect USC to respond the same way, so we’re going to have to play extremely well.”

Outside of the head coaching departure, it’s difficult to know if there’ll be any significant difference between a team lead by Sarkisian or the one that Helton will lead into battle. The offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach has been at USC for six years, and has already held the title of interim head coach when he led the Trojans to a 2013 Las Vegas Bowl title after Lane Kiffin was fired and Ed Orgeron left the program after he wasn’t given the full time position.

Helton will likely call plays, a role he partially handled even when Sarkisian was on the sideline. The defense will still be run by Justin Wilcox. And more importantly, the game plan will be executed by a group of players that are among the most talented in the country.

“They have some of the finest athletes in the country. I’ve recruited a lot of them, and they have an immense amount of pride for their program and personal pride,” Kelly said. “So they will come out with that here at Notre Dame, there is no question about that.”

Irish add commitment from CB Donte Vaughn

Donte Vaughn

Notre Dame’s recruiting class grew on Monday. And in adding 6-foot-3 Memphis cornerback Donte Vaughn, it grew considerably.

The Irish added another jumbo-sized skill player in Vaughn, beating out a slew of SEC offers for the intriguing cover man. Vaughn picked Notre Dame over offers from Auburn, LSU, Miami, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, Tennessee and Texas A&M among others.

He made the announcement on Monday, his 18th birthday:

It remains to be seen if Vaughn can run like a true cornerback. But his length certainly gives him a skill-set that doesn’t currently exist on the Notre Dame roster.

Interestingly enough, Vaughn’s commitment comes a cycle after Brian VanGorder made news by going after out-of-profile coverman Shaun Crawford, immediately offering the 5-foot-9 cornerback after taking over for Bob Diaco, who passed because of Crawford’s size. An ACL injury cut short Crawford’s freshman season before it got started, but not before Crawford already proved he’ll be a valuable piece of the Irish secondary for years to come.

Vaughn is another freaky athlete in a class that already features British Columbia’s Chase Claypool. With a safety depth chart that’s likely turning over quite a bit in the next two seasons, Vaughn can clearly shift over if that’s needed, though Notre Dame adding length like Vaughn clearly points to some of the shifting trends after Richard Sherman went from an average wide receiver to one of the best cornerbacks in football, and Vaughn will be asked to play on the outside.

Vaughn is the 15th member of Notre Dame’s 2016 signing class. He is the fifth defensive back, joining safeties D.J. Morgan, Jalen Elliott and Spencer Perry along with cornerback Julian Love. The Irish project to take one more.

With Notre Dame expecting another huge recruiting weekend with USC coming to town, it’ll be very interesting to see how the Irish staff close out this recruiting class.