Appalachian v Michigan

And in that corner… The Michigan Wolverines


A week after both Notre Dame and Michigan took their opponents to the proverbial woodshed, they’ll do battle one more time, with both proud programs hoping to do the same to their nemesis.

In a game that’s one of the premiere matchups in college football, the lights will shine bright over Notre Dame Stadium as Brian Kelly tries to even things up with Brady Hoke. While Hoke’s seat in Ann Arbor may be warming up after a significant regression the past two seasons, he’s beaten Brian Kelly in two of three matchups.

With a primetime kickoff and the game a key September barometer for success, the last scheduled meeting between both teams will likely be even saltier than usual, in a rivalry recently defined lately by close and heart-wrenching games.

Getting us ready for action is Bleacher Report’s Adam Biggers.


Let’s get this first question out of the way: How strong is the hatred coming from Michigan’s side of this “rivalry.” As strong as it is for Michigan State? That “team from Ohio?” (After being in Ann Arbor last year, I’ve got to think strong to quite strong at the very least.)

There are a lot of Notre Dame alums and fans in Michigan, so Wolverines fans have the experience of running into one of three enemies at every turn, especially those in Ann Arbor, who are minutes away from the borderline of savage society (just kidding, Ohio!).

Saturday, the No. 1 enemy will be Notre Dame—the only team that should exist for the Wolverines this weekend.


Outside of the revenge/upset storyline, how much can you learn from the Wolverines beating an Appalachian State team that was 4-8 in the FCS last year? Change the name to another directional school and would there be as much excitement about the impressive victory?

Michigan did what it had to do, so I’m not going to get too excited about the 52-14 victory. Brady Hoke’s staff had a solid game plan. The players did their jobs. The O-line held tight, the D-line pretty much owned the trenches. Everything that a Michigan fan wanted to see was clear and present at The Big House.

At the end of the day, the Wolverines removed a thorn from their side, but I don’t think they’re looking at it as some monumental accomplishment. But I know for a fact that they’re geared up for Notre Dame.

Jake Ryan told me that the game will be a real test for the defense. I agree. It’ll also be one for the offense, which didn’t dazzle me for four quarters this past weekend.


That said, this was Doug Nussmeier’s debut as offensive coordinator and playcaller and all reports had to be rosy. The Wolverines offense racked up 560 yards on 55 plays. The running game plowed its way to 350 yards, at an astounding 9.7 yards per touch. Devin Gardner completed 13 of 14 passes with three touchdowns to Devin Funchess.

Is Nussmeier in walk-on-water territory after Game One? Is there a grain of salt with all of this? After Al Borges’ offense torched the Irish last year, just how terrified should Notre Dame fans be of the Michigan offense come Saturday night?

Hahaha. No. Not yet. Not even close.

However, to say that Michigan fans are happy about his presence would be an understatement. Watching Devin Gardner and Devin Funchess play catch during the first half of the season-opening win over Appalachian State was a welcome sight; likewise with Derrick Green and De’Veon Smith, who combined for 285 yards and three touchdowns.

It appears that guys whose names start with “D” are going to be stars this fall. Doug Nussmeier could very well be next.

But let’s wait and see how he does against Notre Dame before going bonkers over bonking the Mountaineers.


Greg Mattison tweaked his role in the defense, coaching linebackers now as he and Mark Smith switch roles. There looks to be a lot of talent returning. After Mattison (or the moment) seemed to overwhelm Everett Golson in 2012, how do you think the Wolverines will attack the Irish offense?

Michigan’s defense is going to throw everything at everyone, regardless of helmet color, jersey creed or nationality. Michigan fans should prepare for what could be Mattison’s best defense yet—and that’s saying a lot, considering he brought the Wolverines from the cellar to top-25 contention (defensively) in his first year.

Respecting Golson’s athleticism, I’d imagine that he’ll have a linebacker glued to him for much of the game, anticipating his every move. I’m also going to guess that Notre Dame receivers won’t get a lot of breathing room.
On media day, Jourdan Lewis and Blake Countess, both corners, told me that they were more than confident in their secondary.

That’s a great sign, obviously. A defense is only as strong as its last line of…well…defense.

I like the D-line, especially with Brennen Beyer, Ondre Pipkins, Willie Henry and Matt Godin, among a few others, looking like they’ll be all hustle in 2014. During Week 1, the Wolverines gave up 153 yards on the ground. I wouldn’t think that they’d be too keen on letting sophomores Tarean Folston and Greg Bryant getting remotely close to that. If there’s one “weakness” evident after the opener, it’s run defense up the middle—that has to be buttoned down quickly, which shouldn’t be a problem. You can bet that Mattison’s pumping film right now.


If you were Brian Kelly, how would you attack the Wolverines defense? On the ground, where Michigan gave up a 100-yard rushing game? Through the air? Brady Hoke might be on the hot seat, but he’s beated Kelly three of four times.

Well, as kind of mentioned above, I’d go up the middle until the Wolverines stop allowing positive yardage. Again, this area needs to be tightened up before Saturday; it’s the most concerning aspect of Mattison’s unit so far.


What’s your gut tell you about Saturday night? Notre Dame opened as a six-point favorite in a game that really favors the underdog. In the last game until both ADs can kiss and make up, what are the keys to victory?

Keeping emotions in check will be huge. Neither team can afford an ejection, especially of a star player or even coach, so it’s important for both sides to remain relatively calm—which is easier said than done, considering that this is it (as of now, anyway).

Staples of solid defense, such as winning first and thirds, creating turnovers and limiting the big play are always a good place to start. If I’m Kelly, I want to make sure that Green and Smith are cold. Once warmed up, they can go through walls.

When I asked Smith if he and Green proved anything Saturday, Smith told me this: “[Derrick and I are] powerful runners. It’s going to take more than one person to bring us down.”

These guys are focused and ready to do damage. The Irish have to find a way to cap them—not to mention Devin Funchess—if they want to ensure victory. I see this one going down the final moments, with Michigan slipping away by less than a touchdown.


You can get more from Adam on Twitter @AdamBiggers81.

Even with heavy rain in forecast, kickoff stays in primetime

Post & Courier via Twitter
Post & Courier (via Twitter)

With rain falling and the forecast expecting much more, Notre Dame and Clemson are kicking off in primetime anyway.

College GameDay was on campus this morning, showcasing the soggy conditions and the mud-covered campus. And while some wondered whether or not the kickoff would move up to earlier in the day to take advantage of a slight lull in the conditions, kickoff is remaining at 8:22 p.m.

“We’ve been in constant communication with state and local law enforcement and have monitored weather throughout the week and today,” director of athletics Dan Radakovich said in a statement Friday night. “I’ve spoken with campus leaders, State Highway Patrol, and Governor Nikki Haley, and feel confident we can play the game as scheduled. We ask our fans to be conscientious arriving and departing from our campus as we will have some limitations due to this ongoing weather event.”

Ball security will be key this evening, and during an interview with Tom Rinaldi this morning Kelly mentioned the punting and kick game as concerns in these conditions. The Irish came to Clemson prepared for miserable conditions and if the forecast holds, they’ll get just that.

Irish get commitment from 2017 TE Cole Kmet

Cole Kmet

Notre Dame’s tight end recruiting keeps rolling. The Irish received a commitment from Illinois tight end Cole Kmet, who adds a third piece to Notre Dame’s 2017 recruiting class.

Kmet is a 6-foot-4, 230-pounder, joining fellow blue-chipper 2017 tight end Brock Wright in next year’s recruiting class (they won’t sign until February 2017). He had early offers from plenty of the top programs around the country, but picked Notre Dame over finalist Ohio State, a nice recruiting victory for Scott Booker and Brian Kelly.

Kmet talked about the decision with Irish 247 who broke the news:

“I think it was just a gut feeling knowing it was Notre Dame,” Kmet to Irish 247. “I didn’t want to pass on playing for that program and attending that university. It’s always been the school I wanted an offer from and Ohio State made it really close, but I just couldn’t pass on Notre Dame.”