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Torii Hunter Jr. exits program for baseball career

Notre Dame captain Torii Hunter Jr. is passing on a fifth year. After a star-crossed four years in South Bend, Hunter is saying goodbye to the gridiron and pursing a career in baseball.

The Texas native made the news public, sharing via social media the following message:

I came to Notre Dame to challenge myself, both in the classroom and on the field, but in my time here I found that this university offered a lot more than I would’ve ever imagined. The wisdom and knowledge that I’ve gained from my professors, the lifelong friendships, and the personal growth are only some of the things that have made my Notre Dame experience truly invaluable.

It’s hard to believe that my time at Notre Dame has come to an end. This university has provided me all the necessary tools, including an Information Technology Management degree, to transition smoothly into the next phase of my life.

After long consideration and prayer, I’ve decided not to pursue a fifth year at the University of Notre Dame, but rather follow a dream of playing professional baseball with the Los Angeles Angels.

I want to say thank you to my coaches, teammates, professors, classmates and fans for all the support throughout my career.  I’m truly blessed to be a part of the Notre Dame family. Go Irish!

Hunter was drafted last offseason by the Los Angeles Angels in the 23rd round, the same team where his father spent five years in center field. And instead of returning for his final year of football in South Bend, Hunter will leave with his degree in hand and start a climb up the minor league baseball ladder—a significant climb after playing just part-time in South Bend, hitting just .167 in just 12 at-bats scattered over two seasons.

The move isn’t unexpected, with C.J. Sanders hinting at it a few weeks ago on social media and whispers emerging earlier this fall. And after battling significant injuries for the majority of his time at Notre Dame, a move away from football might be an easy choice.

It’s easy to wonder what could’ve been for Hunter. After being name the MVP of The Opening and an Army All-American as a four-star prospect, Hunter suffered a broken femur in the practices leading up to the game, taking a medical redshirt as a freshman after a slow healing process. Other injuries included a groin tear that cost him a large portion of the 2014 season and a concussion suffered against Texas in the season opener that cost him a game and a November knee injury.

For his career, Hunter made 73 catches for 949 yards and six touchdowns over three seasons.