C.J. Prosise

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‘Anywhere from 5 to 15’

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Five of Notre Dame’s nine current assistant coaches had only weeks to recruit this cycle. Factor in quarterbacks coach Thomas Rees’s pending promotion from graduate assistant to assistant coach and that makes six new Irish coaches chasing recruits for a full year by the time National Signing Day 2018 rolls around. That is Feb. 7, 2018, for those of you already bypassing an entire football season.

It was with this increased time—and theoretically the chance for stronger relationships with fickle high school personalities—in mind a reporter asked Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly about a potential shift in recruiting strategy. Kelly’s response began by focusing on 15 of the 21 recruits the Irish had signed earlier that day. Quickly, though, Kelly pivoted to discussing recruiting rankings.

“Since I’ve been here, if you look at the average rankings, we’re anywhere from 5 to 15,” he said Wednesday. “We’re going to fall somewhere in that range because there’s a line there we can’t get over based upon what our distinctions are here. That line is going to keep us between 5 and 15.

“We know where we’re going to fall. We’re going to continue to recruit the right kind of kids here.”

Kelly then returned to the line of questioning, regarding the value of long-term relationships in recruiting compared to making offers late in the cycle. Versions of the latter strategy bolstered Notre Dame’s class this year, but it innately comes with a high risk :: reward ratio.

His comments regarding “anywhere from 5 to 15” could be considered as an attempt to temper future expectations. More likely, Kelly was acknowledging realities he has come to know intimately after seven full recruiting cycles as the head of Irish program (and an eighth abridged cycle when he had only 55 days to recruit between accepting the job and National Signing Day in 2010).

Are those comments accurate? In Kelly’s time, largely.

For this exercise, let’s rely on the subsidiary of an NBC Sports partner: rivals.com. Yes, some recruiting services rank Notre Dame higher some years than other services do. The same goes for individual recruits. Over an eight-year stretch, that should trend toward evening out. If nothing else, this allows for something of a standard of comparison.

2012: No. 20
In Kelly’s time, Notre Dame has fallen below that range only once, the class of 2012. Rivals ranked that class of 17 recruits No. 20 in the country. Part of that low ranking undoubtedly ties to the size of the class, the smallest of Kelly’s tenure, as Rivals focuses its rankings on a class’s top 20 commitments. (This year’s 21 is the next smallest.)

Five-star quarterback Gunner Kiel and four-star defensive back Tee Shepard never took a snap for the Irish, and four-star athlete DaVonte’ Neal transferred after his freshman season. Neal played in 13 games, finishing with one rush for seven yards, one reception for a loss of five and 21 punt returns for a total of 46 yards.

Removing those players from that class would have dropped Notre Dame to somewhere around No. 32 in the rankings*. This revisionist history, however, fails to account for the exceeded expectations of:
– Four-star offensive lineman, first-round draft pick and current NFL starter Ronnie Stanley
– Four-star defensive lineman and current Jacksonville Jaguar Sheldon Day
– Three-star defensive lineman and current New York Giant Romeo Okwara
– Three-star defensive back, eventual Notre Dame running back and current Seattle Seahawk C.J. Prosise
– Four-star defensive lineman Jarron Jones
– Three-star receiver and current Dallas Cowboy Chris Brown

A thorough retroactive recruiting rankings would also need to include these disappointments and surprises at other schools.

2013: No. 3
The Irish rode the momentum of appearing in the BCS National Championship Game following an undefeated regular season to the peak of Kelly’s recruiting in South Bend. Four five-star recruits highlighted the 24 signees, though defensive tackle Eddie Vanderdoes never made it to Notre Dame Stadium. Even factoring in Vanderdoes’s departure, the Irish class would have ranked fourth according to rivals, with Florida advancing a position by a slim margin.

Again, if accounting for an abrupt, premature departure, one must look at the other end of the spectrum and acknowledge those who possibly outperformed recruiting expectations:
– Four-star defensive lineman Isaac Rochell
– Four-star running back Tarean Folston
– Four star athlete, eventual Notre Dame linebacker James Onwualu
– Four-star offensive lineman and 2017 captain Mike McGlinchey

Only Eight Average Better
Over Kelly’s eight years signing recruits at Notre Dame, only eight schools have averaged a better finish than his 11.875, per rivals.com. The list includes five SEC programs, alongside traditional powers Florida State, USC and Ohio State.

Alabama: 1.625 (with six No. 1 finishes)
Florida State: 5.25
USC: 6.875 (with one No. 1 finish)
LSU: 7.375
Ohio State: 7.5
Auburn: 8.625
Georgia: 9
Florida: 9.375

Perhaps Kelly’s Signing Day range projections do not sit well with some. They do appear to be consistent with results, though.

*Rivals changed its recruiting points formula heading into the class of 2013. The previous formula was more obscure than the current version, thus this altered ranking is only an estimate.

Five things we learned: Virginia Tech 34, Notre Dame 31

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Behind center and ready to play a hero, Malik Zaire awaited the snap. Little did he know the clock was already running.

Seven of the 13 precious seconds remaining in the fourth quarter ticked off the field as the senior surveyed the field, the Irish still needing a nice gain to make a game-tying field goal even possible. And after Zaire left the pocket looking to make a play, even a completion wouldn’t have made a difference. He was out of time.

A fitting final snap of the season in Notre Dame Stadium if there ever was one.

Notre Dame’s fast start and 17-0 lead were not enough, as the Irish fell for the seventh time this year, with Virginia Tech rallying to win 34-31. After scoring on four of their first five drives and exploding for 24 first-half points, DeShone Kizer and the offense cooled off, punting on six of their next seven series as the Hokies offense rallied for the win.

A young Irish defense fought valiantly but gave up four scoring drives in the second half. Kizer’s couldn’t replicate his first-half success.  And any hope of stealing a bowl appearance with two wins against the season’s toughest back-to-back is finished.

So as the lights go out on Notre Dame Stadium for the final time this season, let’s find out what we learned.

 

A gutty effort by DeShone Kizer wasn’t enough to get it done. 

In what might have been his final game in Notre Dame Stadium, DeShone Kizer showed plenty of heart. But he didn’t play well enough to win the game.

Kizer completed 16 of 33 throws for 235 yards and two touchdowns. He led the team in rushing attempts with 16, earning all 69 yards he gained. But when the Irish needed to move the chains and win the game late, the Irish came up empty twice.

Of course, not all of that is on Kizer. A strong wind made accuracy a major challenge. The offensive line that protected him well for the majority of the game, struggled down the stretch. And a perfect deep ball that Kizer lofted down the sideline slid through Equanimeous St. Brown‘s hands, a game-changing catch that never was.  On a Saturday where the Irish offense needed to carry the team to victory, Kizer was just three of 15 in the second half, with Bud Foster’s defense shutting down the Irish in the game’s final 30 minutes, save Josh Adams’ 67-yard touchdown run.

Kizer was unwilling to discuss his future postgame, only that he had a decision to make after the season. But he reportedly hung around on the field after the loss, perhaps taking things in one last time before declaring for the NFL Draft, a decision the smart money already thinks is made.

After taking two clear head-shots that deserved personal foul calls, Kizer clearly left it all on the field. Unfortunately, there were a few missed plays out there as well, and they ended up costing the Irish.

 

Notre Dame’s young secondary couldn’t keep pace with Virginia Tech’s talented receivers. 

Someday a few years from now, Notre Dame fans will look back at the challenge Donte Vaughn, Devin Studstill and Julian Love faced on Saturday and reminisce that games like this helped forge the unit into something better. Until then, it’ll just be called growing pains.

Asked to go toe-to-toe with perhaps the best trio of receivers they’ll face all season (or at least until next weekend), the young defensive backs had some tough assignments, with Isaiah Ford catching seven of his 10 targets for 86 yards and Cam Phillips and Bucky Hodges bringing in touchdown catches. Add in a long catch and run by slot man C.J. Carroll that went for 62 yards and the Irish were unable to make a big play against the Hokies passing attack—other than the gift-wrapped interception that bounced through the hands of Phillips and into the arms of Drue Tranquill.

The Irish defense had multiple opportunities to go out and win the game, but came up short. After holding the Hokies to just 135 yards in the first half they gave up 284 yards in the second, with 206 of those coming through the air. (That doesn’t count the 15 yards that came on a questionable pass interference call on Cole Luke, a play that Kelly thought Luke played perfectly.)

 

We knew the young secondary would have its hands full. Ultimately, it was the Hokies that won the aerial battle.

 

Once again, a fast start can’t make up for a soft finish. 

As we’ve seen far too often this season, Notre Dame’s fast start wasn’t enough. And after being one of the best coaches in America when playing with a lead, the Irish have been disastrous this year, blowing a 17-zip start and a 10-point halftime lead.

Asked to put his finger on the issue, Kelly couldn’t identify one thing.

“We had some balls that were catchable that we didn’t catch. I just don’t think we executed quite as well offensively,” Kelly said. “We weren’t as sharp in the second half as we were in the first half.”

It helps that Virginia Tech got its act together. After Jarod Evans gave away a fumble and the Hokies stumbled out of the gates, head coach Justin Fuente rallied his team—even as a 15-yard unsportsmanlike conduct penalty cost his team an offensive series. Evans led the charge, the massive quarterback the most effective ball-carrier for the Hokies run game, a challenging personnel matchup especially with a fullback on the field that forced the Irish out of their preferred five-man secondary.

For Kelly, it’s another tight loss. A coach who built his reputation on winning games late and doing the job in November is now struggling to find solutions at a critical time of the year. A loser of just 13 one-score games in his first six seasons, he’s lost seven in this season alone.

This one as painful as the rest, his young team giving up the game’s final 13 points to go home a loser.

 

It should be back to the drawing board for Notre Dame’s offensive leadership. 

Last season, the Irish deftly handled the trio of Brian Kelly, Mike Denbrock and Mike Sanford atop the org chart on the offensive side of the football. This season? Quite the opposite.

Because after another hot start to the game—triggered by some pretty impressive Xs and Os and play scripting—it was Virginia Tech that made all the winning adjustments, with Notre Dame’s offensive trio unable to counterpunch after the Hokies game back from halftime.

After reluctantly giving up play-calling last season and seeing the team put up its most explosive numbers ever, this football team’s schizophrenic nature has to be driving Kelly crazy. And after leaning on NFL talent like Will Fuller and C.J. Prosise, this team just hasn’t been able to find the right formula for clutch, late-game play.

When asked about the offensive coaching structure and the decision to give-up play-calling, Kelly steered clear of any second-guessing.

 

“I’m trying the best I can to offer some solutions, but you really have to trust in the play-calling and the execution quite frankly is part of that,” Kelly explained. It’s play-calling, it’s execution, and we had some opportunities that we didn’t convert.”

With his career at a crossroads, expect the head coach to reevaluate the hierarchy. And if you were a betting man, you’d have to assume that Kelly will go back to betting on himself.

 

 

There’s a young team with a promising future in South Bend. But finding a way to shake off this nightmarish season will be Brian Kelly’s largest challenge. 

Eventually it sounds like a broken record. Even the head coach acknowledged it after the game.

“These kids are wonderful kids. I’m just at a loss for words as to what to tell them,” Kelly said. “It’s just been a difficult year. They’ve worked so hard. They play so hard. They’ve been ahead in so many of these games and been so close in the fourth quarter.  Unfortunately, it’s just one of those years. I haven’t had one like this in my 25, 26 years of being a head coach. It just hasn’t gone their way.”

Like we’ve seen all season, the positives have been there. Big plays from Chase Claypool and Chris Finke. Huge games from young defenders like Te’von Coney and veterans like James Onwualu and Jarron Jones.

But as the Irish look for the successful recipe for winning football, they too often have come up just short—with a different culprit seemingly each week. Missed blocks. Ten penalties (and a few crucial ones missed.) Red zone miscues that turn seven points into three. And a crunch time mistake that turns into a fatal mistake.

“I just love our kids. I love the way they battle. We’re going to wake up from this nightmare,” Kelly said, before joking that he hoped he’ll wake up 11-0.

He won’t. And any relief from this nightmare won’t come this November, not with a trip to Los Angeles next weekend that’ll require his players to provide the motivation, now that Notre Dame’s bowl dreams are dashed.

But beyond that, this will be on the head coach. And after assuring himself his first losing season since he rebuilt Central Michigan’s football program, the focus will be on the man on charge. Because he’s got a talented group of players. Now he desperately needs to teach them how to win.

 

 

 

The good, the bad, the ugly: Notre Dame vs. Nevada

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What a difference a week makes. Brian Kelly’s post-Texas proclamation to “relax” seems much easier now than last Monday. That’s what an easy notch in the win column does for you. And a defense that looked much better playing in its base set than trying to slow down Texas.

While a true test of what this team looks like won’t come until next Saturday night against Michigan State, a 25-point second quarter—and some big plays by Brian VanGorder’s defense—made sure that the sky wasn’t falling.

Let’s put the win against the Wolf Pack behind us as the preparations turn towards Sparty. The battle for the Megaphone awaits.

 

THE GOOD

Red Zone Offense. What a difference a year makes. At least so far. Notre Dame’s offense clearly lacks the explosiveness of last season’s. That’s to be expected when you lose freaks like Will Fuller and C.J. Prosise. But the Irish efficiency is much improved, a credit to DeShone Kizer and the Irish red zone offense.

The Irish were six for six again this week, scoring five touchdowns in their drives inside the 20-yard line. (And memo to the RTDB Crowd: Justin Yoon’s field goal came after three-straight runs inside Nevada’s 10-yard line.) The biggest change? Kizer’s accuracy.

A tweet from Pete Sampson at Irish Illustrated laid it out best: In 2015’s regular season, Kizer went 17 of 40 in the red zone, throwing nine touchdowns and five interceptions. This season, Kizer’s already completed 7 of his 10 throws, with five touchdowns and, most importantly, no interceptions.

 

The Run Defense. Things aren’t necessarily broken up front for the Irish, with Notre Dame’s under siege front seven limiting Nevada to just 99 rushing yards on 30 attempts. The strength of the Wolf Pack offense was the ground game, and the Irish withstood a few wrinkles—including a dose of triple option—to keep Nevada’s offense offtrack.

A return to base defense certainly helped. So did a strong performance for Te’von Coney, making his first start at Will linebacker, replacing Greer Martini in the lineup. But once the Irish found their footing on the opening series, the unit built on that crucial 4th-down stop and played very good football.

“We still have a lot of work to do, but we came together,” Daniel Cage said postgame. “We got on each other and took over the game.”

Cage’s knifing stop on fourth down triggered that. So did a very nice game by James Onwualu, who chipped in two TFLs from the Sam linebacker position. Throw in an impactful game by Jonathan Bonner, who almost doubled his snap count from a week earlier, and the front seven is evolving and finding its footing in time for another stiff test.

 

The Kids. There were a lot of firsts for the Irish on Saturday. Catches for receivers Corey Holmes, Kevin Stepherson, Chris Finke and Chase Claypool. Starts for Te’von Coney and Devin Studstill, and appearances for young players Jamir Jones, Khalid Kareem, Tristen Hoge and Trevor Ruhland.

Just as important as any debuts was deepening the rotation. Cornerback Donte Vaughn is a key piece of the puzzle now with Shaun Crawford lost for the season. Julian Love is now the team’s starter at nickel back. And if Nick Coleman continues to struggle, don’t be surprised if Jalen Elliott finds his way onto the field more as well.

Last season’s defensive rotation was almost nonexistent. That won’t be the case this year, as Kelly commented on how he thinks his defense can improve with more players taking on key roles.

“I think it makes us a better defense. I think moving forward you’re going to see a combination of more guys instead of maybe just one or two guys in that rotation.” Kelly was talking specifically about the linebackers in that comment, though it clearly applies to all pieces of the defensive puzzle.

 

Quick Hits: 

Sure, it was a slow start. But Notre Dame’s second quarter explosion had the Irish scoring 25 points, the most in a quarter since the Irish scored 28 against Pitt in 2005, Charlie Weis’ debut.

Brian VanGorder’s defense has usually featured a playmaker at Sam linebacker. Senior captain James Onwualu is quickly becoming one, his two TFLs very impactful. (He nearly had three, but crashed a bit too far inside on a Nevada end-around.)

No, the interception didn’t count. But it was a really nice play by Cole Luke, who was his steady self on Saturday, and also very good against the run.

Great hands by Kevin Stepherson, who took a big hit, but held on to his first touchdown. That’s a lot of trust in a freshman in the red zone.

Nice hands by Jarron Jones, too. Snagging that screen pass that set up an Irish score.

“I think I have great hands,” Jones said postgame. “These hands aren’t big for nothing. I know I can grab a ball.”

A week after Greer Martini earned the starting job at the Will linebacker spot, it looks like Te’von Coney took it back. The sophomore tied for the team lead with five tackles, including one for loss.

 

THE BAD

Pass Rush. With Nevada chasing the Irish after a big second quarter, the Wolf Pack needed to go to the air to try and mount a comeback. So while Nevada quarterbacks Tyler Stewart and Ty Gangi threw 26 times, the Irish defense didn’t get a single sack.

Adding in the Texas stats and the Irish defense has yet to sack the quarterback on 53 passing attempts. They’ve statistically gotten seven quarterback hits, with only Isaac Rochell notching more than one (he has three).

While Jay Hayes continues to recover from a high-ankle sprain, Andrew Trumbetti is manning the weakside defensive end spot. And for the second-straight week, Trumbetti hasn’t mounted anything close to a pass rush, locked down by offensive linemen and generating a second week of negative grading in the pass rush category by PFF College.

We saw young players get their shot at generating a pass rush. Khalid Kareem took a 15-yard personal foul for a late hit (announced during the broadcast as Jay Hayes), while Jon Bonner, Daelin Hayes, Julian Okwara and Jamir Jones also played.

But the Irish need to find a way to get a pass rush. Especially to support a secondary that’s going to be learning as they go with Crawford down and freshmen Julian Love and Devin Studstill playing key roles.

 

The Slow Start. I had a hard time finding a more frustrating first 15 minutes in recent memory than Saturday’s. Whether it was the offense committing penalties to slow themselves down or the opening drive for Nevada, it was an ugly start to a game where I’m sure the coaching staff stressed “start fast.”

Some of that could be attributed to Shaun Crawford’s injury. Some to the new wrinkles from first-year Nevada offensive coordinator Tim Cramsey. But whatever the cause, it took some time for the Irish to settle in, something that won’t make next weekend easy.

 

THE UGLY

Shaun Crawford’s season-ending injury. We talked about the on-field implications. But watching Shaun Crawford go down after making another big play was devastating.

After the game, Cole Luke talked about moving forward without him.

“Shaun’s a great player. He’s just a freak of nature and one of those guys who loves the game,” Luke said. “He comes out to work every single day. That’ll be hard to replace, but we’ll try to lock that in on the young guys.

“You never know when your last play or rep will happen, so you have to treat it like your last. We have a lot of great young guys who will step up and try to fill that role.”

Expect Brian Kelly to reveal more on the time frame of Crawford’s surgery and recovery later today and this week. But we’ve already heard from Crawford on social media—and his response is incredible.

 

Five things we learned: Notre Dame 39, Nevada 10

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Notre Dame’s home opener went the way you’d want. An easy victory, a ton of young players getting experience, and a team back on track with Michigan State coming to town next weekend.

And while head coach Brian Kelly said all the right things about a Nevada team that threw the kitchen sink at the Irish, Wolf Pack head man Brian Polian probably said it best.

“If we were supposed to beat Notre Dame, we wouldn’t be in the Mountain West conference.”

It wasn’t all easy. The Irish offense was slow out of the gate. The defense struggled on their opening series, but made some game-changing plays and held Nevada to just 300 yards. After after a first 20 minutes that was as forgettable as any from last season, the Irish’s talent took over, a victory inside Notre Dame Stadium that leveled the team to 1-1 on the year.

Let’s find out what we learned.

 

The loss of Shaun Crawford will be felt on and off the field.

The defense suffered a painful loss Saturday afternoon when Shaun Crawford went down early with a season-ending achilles injury. The sophomore was hurt after breaking up a pass that initially looked like a forced fumble and recovery. And instead of it being another big play by the diminutive defensive back, it’s a heartbreaking second-straight lost season for Crawford.

A season after not having a Plan B when Crawford went down in August, the Irish will now deploy theirs. That means Nick Coleman back to corner, a week after getting torched at Texas. True freshman Julian Love moves to nickel. And freshman Donte Vaughn will continue to get a look as the Irish secondary waits for junior Nick Watkins to recover from his broken arm.

Earlier in the week, Kelly talked about Coleman’s need to rebound and stay ready. Little did he know that a few days later, he’d be back in the starting lineup.

“Nick played with much better technique and a lot more confidence,” Kelly said. “He’s got to be that player for us with Shaun lost for the season.”

 

The defense woke up and made some plays.

The Irish defense played much, much better on Saturday, a relief not just to the 80,000 inside Notre Dame Stadium and the millions watching at home, but to a coaching staff that had to be wondering what to make of the unproven unit.

Especially after Nevada’s opening drive.

The Wolf Pack marched 62 yards on their opening possession, moving the chains and sustaining a 10-play drive that saw Polian eschew a field goal attempt for a 4th-and-1 run inside the Irish red zone. But Asauni Rufus never had a chance when Daniel Cage knifed through the line and the stop was a big momentum changer for the Irish defense, giving up just 61 yards the rest of the first half.

“We needed some confidence,” Kelly said postgame. “So that fourth-down stop was really a confidence builder for our defense.”

Also building their confidence was Jarron Jones’ interception, the fifth-year senior snagging a screen pass and setting the Irish offense up with the ball near the goal line. While the defense’s two other big plays—Crawford’s forced fumble and Tranquill’s return, along with a very nice interception by Cole Luke—were both overturned by referees, the defense played more than respectable after getting bludgeoned in Austin.

It took a group of back-ups to finally give up a touchdown to Nevada and the Wolf Pack were held to just 300 total yards— a big step forward for a unit that focused not on mixing and matching exotic looks, but playing fundamentally sound football.

“I thought we tackled better, played the ball better in the air, and just made the kind of improvement that we were looking for from week one to week two,” Kelly said.

 

DeShone Kizer is the engine of this offense. 

After earning the starting job, DeShone Kizer backed it up with a near flawless performance, a 15 for 18 day with two touchdowns, the only poor throw on the afternoon an underthrown deep ball to Kevin Stepherson. Add in another touchdown on the ground and two more through the air and Kizer’s responsible for nine touchdowns through the first two weeks, elite play by the junior signal caller.

Kelly praised Kizer’s poise, applauding that he’s willing to take what the defense is giving him. He also praised Kizer’s development in the scoring area, the Irish scoring all six times they were in the scoring zone, with five touchdowns and just one field goal.

“I think he was a little bit more patience in certain areas,” Kelly said. “Especially in the red zone. Where now he’s had two touchdowns in the red zone where he’s been really patient, hitting his third and fourth option down there.”

With the game in hand, Kizer turned the keys of the offense over to Malik Zaire, who played well in relief, making a few big plays and driving the Irish to a score. But Kizer is the most important piece of the puzzle for this team, and his efficiency—even while breaking in a young group of receivers—has been really impressive.

 

With Equanimeous St. Brown and C.J. Sanders, the Irish have two young, dynamic talents at receiver. 

Don’t look now, but Notre Dame has two emerging stars at wide receiver. Both Equanimeous St. Brown and C.J. Sanders continued their hot start, with both sophomores playing large without Torii Hunter available.

St. Brown had 85 yards and six catches, nearly breaking two big plays early. Sanders’ numbers might have been more modest, five catches for 46 yards and a score, but he came through with a clutch fourth-down conversion and scored the team’s first touchdown.

With Will Fuller, Chris Brown and Amir Carlisle all gone, Kelly talked about the challenge to replace that trio and fill their shoes with the next generation.

“We had the spring and the summer to really spend the time at developing. We knew they had to be the next guys in,” Kelly said. “And we had a lot of confidence that we were going to be able to turn over a very good group. But they needed to obviously work together.”

While Kelly applauded the jump in play from week one to week two for the defense, the same step forward was made by the young receivers, with Kevin Stepherson scoring his first touchdown, Corey Holmes converting a clutch third-and-long, and Chris Finke and Chase Claypool making their first career grabs.

“We wanted to get them involved early. We felt like it was important to get Corey and Stepherson some touches early,” Kelly said. “Get them some confidence and they’ll make some plays for us.”

 

Kelly will keep rotating backs, but Josh Adams is quickly establishing himself as a workhorse.

Josh Adams had a big Saturday. And Notre Dame’s record-setter as a freshman did his best to take a three-man rotation and make it a one-man show. Adams only needed 10 touches to get past 100 yards, running for 106 yards and breaking off a nifty 43-yarder in the third quarter.

Though Adams, Tarean Folston and Dexter Williams each got ten carries, Kelly was asked postgame if Adams is starting to emerge as the team’s No. 1 back.

“He’s good. You can call him whatever you want. No. 1, No. 101,” Kelly said. “It’s one of those things where Folston had 10 carries, Adams had 10 carries and Williams had 10 carries, but you can make the argument that (Adams) should get 20.

“But Folston is a pretty sharp guy and Dexter is explosive. I think we’ll keep a balance in there, but Adams looked good today.”

In his first extended playing time this season, Williams showed a burst that might have been better than both Adams and Folston. So while the loss of C.J. Prosise (and his home-run speed) has changed the complexion of the Irish ground game, Adams’ ascent is coming at a perfect time—with Michigan State just around the corner.

 

 

Notre Dame vs. Texas: Final thoughts before kickoff

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The first Saturday of the college football season yielded many a surprising result. Though perhaps one thing wasn’t all that shocking—those preseason polls weren’t worth the paper they’re printed on, nor the oxygen of the ensuing debate.

Saturday belonged to the underdog. Houston, Wisconsin and Texas A&M all beat College Football Playoff contenders, perhaps making themselves as one in the process. Western Michigan beat Northwestern, South Alabama beat Mississippi State and Richmond dominated Virginia—with just as many big programs surviving a near upset.

What does that mean for Notre Dame? Nothing really. But on a weekend where the unexpected was rather common, a few conclusions drawn from a wild weekend could play into Sunday’s primetime kickoff between the Irish and the Longhorns.

 

Notre Dame and Texas aren’t the only programs juggling two quarterbacks.

Brian Kelly made the unorthodox announcement that both DeShone Kizer and Malik Zaire were going to play against Texas. Charlie Strong was unwilling to tell anybody but his team who was starting between senior Tyrone Swoopes and freshman Shane Buechele.

Turns out, Kelly and Strong are hardly alone. Turn on a game this weekend and you likely saw head coaches shuffling between quarterbacks. Perhaps just as telling, just about every one of the scenarios seemed to skew closer to the old adage, not the belief of Kelly’s that two of his best playmakers are at the same position.

As if anybody needed a reminder, the juggling act isn’t easy. Even good coaches like David Shaw derailed offensive momentum the moment he brought in No. 2.

But it helps to have talented players. Notre Dame’s two-headed monster doesn’t resemble most of the tandems that were largely ineffective this weekend. Both it’ll still take plenty of work to bring out the best in the position, let alone both Kizer and Zaire.

 

Trench warfare is critical. 

Nothing was more telling this weekend than the battles in the trenches. Saturday seemed to be separated mostly by the ability for teams to win at the point of attack.

Notre Dame should have the edge in both matchups, with the Irish offensive line capable of getting Texas’s front four on their heels, while a beaten up Longhorns offensive line faces a physical defensive front that will attempt to slow down an up-tempo Texas attack.

It might not be that simple. We’ll see how Harry Hiestand’s restacked offensive line performs with new center Sam Mustiper calling the shots and Colin McGovern and Alex Bars working together for the first time on the right side.

On defense, Isaac Rochell is a proven commodity, but getting a true status check on Jarron Jones is critical. At his best, Jones can ruin Texas’s game plan. As a 25-snap player, he’ll turn the keys over to Daniel Cage and some unproven depth. Add in a critical season from Jerry Tillery and a still unsolved weakside defensive end, and take some time to keep an eye on Keith Gilmore’s group.

Over seven recruiting cycles, Brian Kelly has built an offensive line that’s the envy of the (non-Alabama) college football world. He’s struggled a bit more on the defensive front, but there’s a lot talented (but unproven) depth that’ll have to get experience this season.

Two critical showdowns. And two battles that the Irish need to win.

 

In front of the first sellout crowd of the Charlie Strong era, poise is critical. 

Brian Kelly acknowledges that he won’t fully know his young team until he sees how they react running out of the tunnel.

“We’ve got some young players. They’re going to have to settle down and play with some poise,” Kelly told ESPN Sunday morning. “But we’ve got a good nucleus of guys who have been on the road in some pretty raucous environments. It’s like any opener, we’re going to have some guys that’ll need to settle into the game, but I think we’re well prepared and they’re excited about the opportunity.

Kelly has talked multiple times this week about the idea of sparring with the Longhorns—almost willing to get into the feel of the game to get a sense of how they plan on defending the Irish. That could be a way of helping his team to find its footing, or it could be a smoke screen. (Notre Dame all but landed a first-round knockout last year against Texas. Don’t expect the offense to be all that vanilla.)

But this is a far less experienced group than the one that opened up last season. And with an offense that’ll be mixing and matching quarterbacks and a defense that’ll be breaking in a lot of new faces, making sure the Irish aren’t digging out of an early hole might be the first point of order.

 

Who is going to make the big plays? 

Will Fuller is gone. Jaylon Smith is as well. While both former All-Americans could be in the stadium cheering on the Irish, they’ll be in street clothes, passing off their big-play duties to still-to-be-determined former teammates.

Most expect big things from Torii Hunter in the passing game. We’ll see if he’s up to the task against a hometown program that only showed lukewarm interest in him. Nyles Morgan is now the man in the middle of the Irish defense. Against Smash Brothers D'Onta Foreman and Chris Warren, he’ll need to be a tackling machine.

Shaun Crawford is making his debut as a starter in the secondary. Freshman Daelin Hayes gets his chance to show off his pass rush skills.

Tarean Folston is back. So is Josh Adams. Receivers Equanimous St. Brown and C.J. Sanders move into the lineup, both capable of big plays.

Most believe the Irish offense will continue to excel, replacing Fuller and C.J. Prosise and a unit that had the highest yards per play average in school history. But standouts on both sides of the ball need to emerge.