Cameron Smith

Associated Press

Notre Dame offense may trend toward run, partly thanks to Wimbush

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Perhaps after Saturday’s ground-based successes, Notre Dame will deliver more of the same moving forward. Entering the season with a promising but unknown commodity at quarterback, the Irish may have needed a few weeks to learn what exactly would and would not work when facing live competition.

“I really didn’t know how this offense was going to be from the quarterback position in terms of where [junior quarterback Brandon Wimbush] was going to take it until we actually got into a few games,” Irish coach Brian Kelly said following Notre Dame’s 49-20 victory at Boston College. “Now I think we know what part of the library we need to move toward, and we’ve got plenty of offense.

“We can start to really focus in on the things that he does really well, and that’s where this offense will continue to grow and develop.”

Wimbush does many things well. Currently chief among them, as illustrated Saturday, is evade defenders as he works his way down the field.

Saying the Irish will rely on their running game moving forward because it fits Wimbush’s skill set is not a shot at the quarterback. The Notre Dame rushing attack hinges on him being a contributing factor.

“You’ve just got to find a way to find something that’s working for you,” Wimbush said. “It happened to be my feet during this game.”

It was not only his feet, it was any Irish ballcarrier’s feet. It took a group effort to rush for 515 yards on 51 carries, setting a modern-era school record for average carry at 10.1 yards.

Wimbush went for 207 yards on 21 touts. Junior running back Josh Adams needed only 18 rushes to gain 229 yards. Classmate Dexter Williams took six attempts for 50 yards. Sophomore Deon McIntosh used his four closing opportunities to gain 24 yards, and sophomore Tony Jones gained five yards on two carries.

The one of those warranting the most notice is Adams. He gained in big chunks and small ones. He broke tackles. He reached for extra yards. (more…)

Notre Dame lands second WR in class of 2018

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Notre Dame picked up the commitment of consensus four-star receiver Kevin Austin on Friday as the summer recruiting rush nears its end. Austin (North Broward High School; Coconut Creek, Fla.) chose the Irish over finalists Duke, Miami and Tennessee, with Clemson, Michigan, Oregon and many others also expressing interest in him.

At 6-foot-3 and 185 pounds, rivals.com rates Austin the No. 28 receiver in the class of 2018, the No. 141 prospect in the country and the No. 32 player in Florida.

Notre Dame currently has a plethora of receivers but its depth chart remains in flux, especially in the two classes ahead of Austin. First off, junior Equanimeous St. Brown may have the viable option of heading to the NFL after the season, and fifth-year senior graduate transfer (from Arizona State) Cameron Smith will be out of eligibility after this season. Those two departures would and will open up plenty of opportunity.

Of the current sophomores, only Chase Claypool has established himself. Kevin Stepherson remains a baffling question mark, and Javon McKinley has yet to get much of an opportunity. Freshmen Jafar Armstrong and Michael Young only got to campus this summer, but either would need to overcome a deep roster to find extensive playing time this fall.

Thus, when Austin arrives, a chance may be waiting for him or mid-February commit Micah Jones (Warren Township H.S.; Gurnee, Ill.), a rivals.com four-star.

Including both Austin and Jones, the Irish class of 2018 is up to 16 commitments, six now coming this summer. Theoretically, players often like to make a commitment before their high school senior seasons start. It allows them to focus on their own schedule without the added stress and possible travel of recruiting.

More than that — especially considering how many recruits still take their official visits because they recognize the value of a free trip to a high-profile sporting event — with each recruit committing somewhere, it pushes a domino effect forward. With Austin’s commitment, other receivers around the country now see one fewer school targeting the position. Other Notre Dame targets see one fewer spot available in South Bend.

In the remaining handful of openings, the Irish coaching staff will presumably target the troubling void of cornerbacks in this class and the current freshman class, as well as look for at least one more offensive lineman and one more defensive lineman each.

Naturally, as is the case with all 16 commitments, National Signing Day is still a long ways off.

Notre Dame’s lack of leadership last season an early issue to address this fall; injury update and transfers’ readiness

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When the likes of linebacker Jaylon Smith, defensive lineman Sheldon Day and left tackle Ronnie Stanley all headed to the 2016 NFL Draft, Irish coach Brian Kelly knew Notre Dame was losing valuable on-field production. He did not necessarily realize the intangible contributions they were taking with them, as well.

“[I] focused way too much on production and not the process itself and how important it is to have that attention to detail, that laser focus,” Kelly said Monday. “… I let our football team down not focusing on those very important values and that process and went right to production. I just looked to replace production.”

Now a year removed from seeing quarterback DeShone Kizer, linebacker James Onwualu and defensive lineman Isaac Rochell embrace the challenges of the NFL, Kelly is attempting to plant the seeds of leadership earlier among his players, and among more of them, at that. The Irish captains were in charge of cleaning the locker room this summer, which inevitably meant every player kept things a bit tidier. By not waiting for the season to embrace a wider array of captains, Kelly hopes it not only stabilizes certain dynamics this season, but also sets a precedent moving forward.

“It kept building some and drilling down deeper to get more leaders to step up outside of those [captains] because they’re going to graduate,” he said. “We needed them to be in those roles prior to being selected as captains.”

It was that void atop the roster in terms of maturity and leadership Kelly said he started to notice just before the 2016 season. Even if the year had gone 8-4, or even better, instead of 4-8, he insisted many of this offseason’s changes would still have occurred.

“Clearly we had some off-the-field issues leading into the season,” he said in a vague reference to a number of arrests last August. “We had some things that I had done a poor job in developing our leadership and the message was not clear within the program.

“Yes, we’d be at this same place regardless of whether we would have had a monsoon or kicked a field goal or went for a first down instead of kicking a field goal.”

Among those now leading the way in Kelly’s view is junior quarterback Brandon Wimbush.

“The way he handles himself, the way he works, his attention to detail, the way he handles himself on campus, that’s what I want [other players] to model after,” Kelly said. “… He is doing the things necessary that we want others to do, as well.”

Injury updates
As had been reported earlier in July, senior defensive tackle Daniel Cage will not be a part of the team in 2017, though his future beyond that remains unclear. If both his concussion symptoms and knee recover fully, it is possible Cage plays in 2018.

Junior defensive tackle Elijah Taylor remains 10-14 days away from full health after suffering a LisFranc fracture early in spring practice. Kelly said Taylor is nearly ready, but is not yet moving laterally.

To make up for Cage’s absence and the continued easing back of Taylor, the Irish will give chances to three freshmen in Kurt Hinish, Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa and Darnell Ewell.

“[Those] freshmen will have to be part of the evaluation process,” Kelly said. “They did some really good things in terms of developing, in terms of strength and power and quickness during the time that they were here.

“They’ll be part of the evaluation process as to whether they can assist in some fashion in the fall.”

RELATED READING: Notre Dame defensive line adds weight as a whole

Junior cornerback Shaun Crawford has been given the green light following his Achilles injury last season. Kelly still spoke of caution in bringing Crawford back to a full workload, but that should not be an issue by the time the season begins.

Transfers waiting and ready
Sophomore safety and Navy transfer Alohi Gilman has not yet received a ruling from the NCAA pertaining to his request for a waiver of the usual year on the sidelines following a transfer. Kelly said Notre Dame received a briefing Friday indicating the news should come sooner than later, but there is not yet a set timeline.

If Gilman is eligible, he will immediately fit into the two-deep at safety. Thus, until a ruling is issued the Irish must balance getting him ready in case he can play against getting others repetitions in case he cannot.

“What we’ll do is probably get him some work in there to keep him part of the installation and understanding of assignments of what we’re doing,” Kelly said. “He didn’t have the luxury of going through spring ball, so he’s going to have to learn.

“But we’ll also make certain that we have contingency plans. The first three, four days you’ll see a number of guys working at those positions, so we make sure that we cover all the bases.”

Fifth-year senior and Arizona State transfer Cameron Smith and senior Michigan transfer Freddy Canteen are both eligible this season as graduate transfers. They join a receiving corps that lacked a senior before their arrival, which may have been one of the driving reasons Kelly was pleased to welcome both players to Notre Dame.

“Cam is physically fit, can do the things within the offensive structure, knows the offense very well,” Kelly said. “I think immediately he goes out there and is able to compete at a high level right away because he knows the offense.

“… Both of those guys bring a maturity and a focus and attention to detail that I was looking for. A maturity, if you will, to that group that I think we needed.”

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 6 Equanimeous St. Brown, receiver

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-5, 204 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Junior with two years of eligibility remaining including the 2017 season.
Depth chart: St. Brown will start as the field receiver, otherwise known as the X. Even as he may move around from the field to the boundary, St. Brown will be a threat for nearly every offensive snap.
Recruiting: A consensus four-star recruit, St. Brown held offers from 10 of the Pac-12 programs with Oregon and Oregon State the outliers, as well as from LSU, Miami and Vanderbilt, among others. The Under Armour All-American waited until National Signing Day to commit to the Irish. Rivals.com listed him as the No. 15 receiver in the class of 2015, the No. 23 prospect in California and the No. 144 player in the country.

CAREER TO DATE
After a ho-hum, limited-action, injury-shortened freshman season, St. Brown broke out last year, to say the least. St. Brown led Notre Dame in receptions, receiving yards and receiving touchdowns, establishing himself as then-quarterback DeShone Kizer’s most-dangerous as well as most-consistent target.

2015: Seven games, one reception for eight yards before a shoulder injury ended his debut campaign. St. Brown blocked a punt against USC.
2016: 12 games, 12 starts, 58 receptions for 961 yards and nine touchdowns. Highlighting his season, St. Brown took four catches for 182 yards and two touchdowns against Syracuse, including a 79-yard score on the first play from scrimmage. He also logged 116 receiving yards against Duke.

QUOTES
When a sophomore comes about two average-length catches short of a 60-reception, 1,000-yard and 10-touchdown season, not much needs to be worried about the following spring. Instead, Irish coach Brian Kelly noted the improvements in the receiver corps around its standout, though St. Brown is obviously working to stay ahead of the pack, as well.

“I see better balance,” Kelly said in late March. “We have some guys that will come up to the level [St. Brown] was at least year to give the quarterback and the offense a little more balance than we had last year. [St. Brown] will be a better player. He’s working on some of the weaknesses that he has, which limits him in certain areas, and he’s diligently working on those.

“You’re going to see a better supporting cast across the board, which will give us much more balance. More importantly, it’s going to give us much more consistency from an offensive standpoint.”

WHAT KEITH ARNOLD PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
The drop-off from a veteran like Chris Brown to a receiver with one career catch is sizable. But from a physical skills perspective, St. Brown can do everything needed to be a standout, he just needs to grow up in a hurry.

“Predicting a breakout sophomore season like the ones Golden Tate or Will Fuller had isn’t fair. But with a strong running game and Torii Hunter across from him, St. Brown will have plenty of opportunities to make big plays, he just needs to seize those chances.

“Can St. Brown put himself on course to be the next great Irish receiver? The hype has slowed, but there’s no reason the answer should be no.

“This camp has been all about young receivers finding consistency. While [current-sophomore] Kevin Stepherson seems to have taken most of the excitement, I think St. Brown will be the best of the bunch — at least in 2016.

“But let’s keep expectations in check. I’ll set the bar somewhere between Torii Hunter’s 2015 and Chris Brown’s junior season, with St Brown catching somewhere around 30 balls if he stays healthy and holds onto his starting job.”

2017 OUTLOOK
Suffice it to say, St. Brown exceeded any and all expectations in 2016, beginning with his tumbling touchdown against Texas. In a way, those successes make it likely St. Brown falls short of expectations in 2017. If he does appear to take a step back, whether that is shown in statistics or not, it could be partly due to the added depth Kelly referred to.

Notre Dame has more options at receiver this year, losing only Hunter form last year’s top-five receivers, and only him and [Purdue transfer] Corey Holmes among those with double-digit catches. Meanwhile, junior quarterback Brandon Wimbush will have an ascending junior Miles Boykin to target at the boundary position and returning, to much hype, junior tight end Alizé Mack drawing attention, as well.

Defenses will not be able to key on St. Brown this season, but Wimbush will not be doing so, either. Overall, that behooves the team, even if it lessens St. Brown’s chances of gaining 39 more yards than last season to reach a four-digit total.

DOWN THE ROAD
Do not be surprised if St. Brown declares for the NFL after this, his junior, season. This is a player with an intellect capable enough to speak three languages fluently (German, French and he dabbles in a little English). He will presumably be close to graduation by the end of 2018’s spring semester. A strong season with a few notable highlights could solidify a strong draft status.

That said, do not be surprised if St. Brown returns to Notre Dame for another year. If he does, that may be a positive indicator for the Irish for a few years beyond 2018. St. Brown’s youngest brother, Amon-Ra St. Brown, is the No. 1 receiver and No. 4 player overall in the class of 2018, per rivals.com, and is considering a list of scholarship offers even more impressive than his oldest brother’s was. Name a prominent college football program and Amon-Ra has heard from its coaching staff, including Alabama, Michigan, Ohio State, Miami, Oklahoma and Oregon (though still no note of Oregon State).

If the consensus five-star chooses Notre Dame over USC and Stanford, perhaps Equanimeous St. Brown will not be able to resist spending a season lining up alongside his brother. However, it should be noted, the middle St. Brown brother, Osiris, will be a freshman receiver at Stanford this season.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95: Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 92)
No. 94: Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 95)
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92: Jonathon MacCollister; defensive end (originally theorized as No. 46)
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87: Michael Young, receiver (originally theorized as No. 84)
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84: Cole Kmet, tight end (originally theorized as No. 90)
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 76: Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman (originally theorized as No. 65)
No. 75: Josh Lugg, offensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 73)
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center
No. 53: Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman
No. 48: Greer Martini, inside linebacker
No. 47: Kofi Wardlow, defensive end
No. 45: Jonathan Jones, inside linebacker
No. 44: Jamir Jones, linebacker/defensive lineman
No. 42: Julian Okwara, defensive end
No. 41: Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 94)
No. 40: Drew White, linebacker
No. 39: Jonathan Doerer, kicker (originally theorized as No. 52)
No. 38: Deon McIntosh, running back/receiver
No. 35: David Adams, linebacker
No. 34: Tony Jones, Jr., running back
No. 33: Josh Adams, running back
No. 32: D.J. Morgan, safety
No. 30: Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, rover
No. 29: Kevin Stepherson, receiver
No. 28: Nicco Fertitta, safety
No. 27: Julian Love, cornerback
No. 26: Ashton White, safety
No. 25: Jafar Armstrong, receiver (originally theorized as No. 87)
No. 24: Nick Coleman, safety
No. 23: Drue Tranquill, rover
No. 22: Asmar Bilal, rover
No. 21: Jalen Elliott, safety
No. 20: Shaun Crawford, cornerback
No. 19: Justin Yoon, kicker
No. 18: Troy Pride, cornerback
No. 17: Isaiah Robertson, safety
No. 16: Cameron Smith, receiver
No. 15: C.J. Holmes, running back
No. 14: Devin Studstill, safety
No. 13: Avery Davis, quarterback
No. 13: Jordan Genmark Heath, safety
No. 12: Ian Book, quarterback
No. 12: Alohi Gilman, safety
No. 11: Freddy Canteen, receiver
No. 10: Chris Finke, receiver
No. 9: Daelin Hayes, defensive end
No. 8: Donte Vaughn, cornerback
No. 7: Brandon Wimbush, quarterback
No. 7: Nick Watkins, cornerback

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 7 Nick Watkins, cornerback

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-1, 203 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Senior with two years of eligibility remaining including the 2017 season.
Depth chart: Partly due to his size, partly due to his seniority and partly due to his overall skill, Watkins is the likely starter at the boundary cornerback position this fall. Sophomore Donte Vaughn backs up Watkins, but it is more likely to be junior Shaun Crawford as the third cornerback on the field, though he is expected to focus on nickel back.
Recruiting: A consensus four-star prospect, Watkins could have gone to about any school he wanted, receiving offers from Alabama, Florida State and Ohio State, just to name a few. His recruiting rankings may not have been as high as those offers would indicate since he did not take part in much of the camp circuit. Rivals.com rated the Under Armour All-American the No. 15 cornerback in the class of 2014, the No. 22 recruit in Texas and the No. 186 overall player in the country.

CAREER TO DATE
Originally, Watkins struggled to see much playing time because the Irish could rely on KeiVarae Russell and Cole Luke to man the position. When injuries decimated Notre Dame’s depth, Watkins got his first chance at genuine playing time against the dynamic Ohio State offense in the Fiesta Bowl following the 2015 season. He rose to the challenge, making three tackles and breaking up one pass against an offense filled with pro prospects.

2014: 11 games almost entirely on special teams, no other statistics.
2015: 12 games, one start (Ohio State), contributed both on special teams and as a defensive reserve, eight tackles.
2016: A broken arm suffered in spring practice did not heal in time to make playing Watkins a worthwhile maneuver last season, thus preserving him a year of eligibility.

QUOTE(S)
A year lost to injury is never a positive thing, but Irish coach Brian Kelly pointed to some hidden perks to Watkins spending 2016 on the sidelines.

“Nick is playing with a lot of confidence,” Kelly said in late March. “He’s long. He’s very coachable. He’s a great kid and [I] really like the way he’s competing out there. The season off obviously was in a lot of ways disappointing, but I think he benefited greatly from that year to see it, to learn. He’s had a really terrific offseason in the weight room and you can see his transition out of his break, breaking on the ball, playing physical at the line of scrimmage. Nice to have him back. He really gives us a presence out there that we’re starting to feel.”

That presence is part of why the cornerbacks are now more often described as boundary and field positions, rather than left and right or strong side and weak side.

“What I think [defensive coordinator] Mike [Elko] does really well … is we all have strengths and weaknesses,” Kelly said. “He has a great eye of saying let’s take Nick’s strengths and let’s put him in a position where we can really utilize his strengths. Maybe we’re not a right and left corner team — maybe we’re a short field, wide field. Let’s apply him in that fashion.

“Nick’s long. He’s a little bit of a physical player and let’s go to those strengths. He’s shown some of those attributes early on.”

WHAT KEITH ARNOLD PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
Of all the injuries we tracked this offseason, Watkins’ broken arm seemed the least on the radar, though has a chance to be the most impactful. That Notre Dame’s medical staff is treating it aggressively says something about the player they think they have in Watkins — who Kelly said would be allowed to fight for a starting job once he’s physically able.

“I’m no doctor — but that won’t stop me from evaluating Watkins’ progress. And for the most part, I don’t think it’s the best formula for success jumping into the mix with no training camp and limited time to get in shape at the most demanding position on Notre Dame’s roster.

“While losing Watkins is a blow — especially with the length of these suspensions unknown — any chance to take a medical redshirt could be huge for Notre Dame’s depth, getting Watkins a chance to redo his junior season, capable of stepping in after Cole Luke departs.”

2017 OUTLOOK
In theory, a broken arm should not have lingering effects 18 months later. With that in mind, Watkins should have a strong hold on playing time this season. His performance against Ohio State may have been only one game, but it was such a promising showing there is a distinct temptation to forgo any sample size disclaimers.

Watkins’ physicality can be applied on the boundary, where the sideline limits a receiver’s escape options. The question will be how long it takes Watkins to get back up to game speed, both mentally and physically. The latter half of that query may come down to instinct. As for his mental readjustment, Watkins may be the biggest beneficiary of the particular tendencies of the first few Irish opponents. Temple, Georgia and Michigan State all lean heavily on their run games, giving Watkins a few weeks to adjust to his first consistent collegiate playing time.

DOWN THE ROAD
Losing Watkins in 2016, along with a number of other defensive backs, undoubtedly played a role in the disappointing season. No one would say having him around in 2018 will be worth that trade, but it is a nice perk.

Notre Dame’s cornerback depth will be a genuine asset the next two seasons. Having Watkins around for the second half of that will play a crucial part in stabilizing the position amid recent recruiting misses.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95: Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 92)
No. 94: Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 95)
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92: Jonathon MacCollister; defensive end (originally theorized as No. 46)
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87: Michael Young, receiver (originally theorized as No. 84)
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84: Cole Kmet, tight end (originally theorized as No. 90)
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 76: Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman (originally theorized as No. 65)
No. 75: Josh Lugg, offensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 73)
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53: Sam Mustipher, center
No. 53: Khalid Kareem, defensive lineman
No. 48: Greer Martini, inside linebacker
No. 47: Kofi Wardlow, defensive end
No. 45: Jonathan Jones, inside linebacker
No. 44: Jamir Jones, linebacker/defensive lineman
No. 42: Julian Okwara, defensive end
No. 41: Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle (originally theorized as No. 94)
No. 40: Drew White, linebacker
No. 39: Jonathan Doerer, kicker (originally theorized as No. 52)
No. 38: Deon McIntosh, running back/receiver
No. 35: David Adams, linebacker
No. 34: Tony Jones, Jr., running back
No. 33: Josh Adams, running back
No. 32: D.J. Morgan, safety
No. 30: Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, rover
No. 29: Kevin Stepherson, receiver
No. 28: Nicco Fertitta, safety
No. 27: Julian Love, cornerback
No. 26: Ashton White, safety
No. 25: Jafar Armstrong, receiver (originally theorized as No. 87)
No. 24: Nick Coleman, safety
No. 23: Drue Tranquill, rover
No. 22: Asmar Bilal, rover
No. 21: Jalen Elliott, safety
No. 20: Shaun Crawford, cornerback
No. 19: Justin Yoon, kicker
No. 18: Troy Pride, cornerback
No. 17: Isaiah Robertson, safety
No. 16: Cameron Smith, receiver
No. 15: C.J. Holmes, running back
No. 14: Devin Studstill, safety
No. 13: Avery Davis, quarterback
No. 13: Jordan Genmark Heath, safety
No. 12: Ian Book, quarterback
No. 12: Alohi Gilman, safety
No. 11: Freddy Canteen, receiver
No. 10: Chris Finke, receiver
No. 9: Daelin Hayes, defensive end
No. 8: Donte Vaughn, cornerback
No. 7: Brandon Wimbush, quarterback

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship