Durham Smythe

Associated Press

Things We Learned: Notre Dame can turn to Book, though may prefer not to

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For at least a day, No. 21 Notre Dame could survive without junior quarterback Brandon Wimbush. Testing that fate long-term might be a riskier proposition.

Irish sophomore quarterback Ian Book started in Wimbush’s stead during Notre Dame’s 33-10 victory at North Carolina on Saturday. Book completed only 17-of-31 passes for 146 yards and one score, also throwing two interceptions and rushing for 47 yards on 11 carries.

Those statistics certainly qualify as underwhelming — especially the 4.7 yards per passing attempt, compared to Wimbush’s 5.9 to date — but Book did not need to put up dazzling numbers to qualify as a one-off success. He needed to avoid crippling mistakes, he needed to keep the Irish offense on-task and he needed to make a play here or there. That much, Book did.

“He’s a very confident kid,” Irish coach Brian Kelly said. “He overthrew a couple of balls here and there. For a first start, I was really pleased with what he did today. To win on the road is hard to do. The ideal situation is to start at home in a more comfortable environment but I thought he went in and did some really good things for us.”

Even the two interceptions were tolerable. One came from Notre Dame’s own three-yard line. Without many options available, Book heaved a pass downfield for junior receiver Chris Finke. Slightly overthrown, it gifted possession to the Tar Heels at the 47-yard line. Essentially, it served as a punt without the risk of a punt block in the end zone.

The other pick came when Book overthrew fifth-year tight end Durham Smythe. That mistake cost the Irish a red zone opportunity, but it may have been the result of Book’s inexperience more than anything else. To the untrained eye, it looked as if Book expected Smythe to run the route a yard deeper, but Smythe gauged the coverage slightly differently.

Neither turnover qualified as “crippling.”

Wimbush should be back against USC in two weeks. (More on that, and other injuries, in a bit.) Presuming that is the case, Book served the spot starter role well. More than that, though, he showed the potential to carry the load down the line.

His arm is not as strong as Wimbush’s, few are, but it was more than able to get passes into tight windows. Some of that can be attributed to accuracy, a rare sight around the Irish offense with Wimbush at the helm.

Notre Dame frequently got sophomore quarterback and first-time starter Ian Book out of the pocket Saturday to simplify the reads in front of him as well as to play to Book’s strengths as a mobile passer. (Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)

Book lacks Wimbush’s big-play running ability, but he was mobile enough to throw on the move. That skill, in fact, played a part in Notre Dame’s 25 first-half passes. From the outset, Kelly wanted to play to Book’s strengths.

“We wanted to mostly take advantage of some of the play-action opportunities to complement our run game,” Kelly said. “It was going to be a run-centered game for us. Getting some high-percentage throws, on the move, where he didn’t have to sit in the pocket and do progression reads across the field.”

The first touchdown pass of sophomore quarterback Ian Book’s career was also the first touchdown at Notre Dame for fifth-year senior and Arizona State graduate transfer Cam Smith. (Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)

Those play calls served to simplify Book’s reads and to tilt the field toward his favor. Without Wimbush’s speed, Book’s rollouts-turned-scrambles were never going to gain 30-plus yards, but he frequently took advantage of open space available. Most notably, he ran for nine yards on a second-and-10 from the North Carolina 20-yard-line at the end of the first quarter. Two plays later, Book found fifth-year receiver Cam Smith for the first score of the day. That scramble kept the drive moving forward, preventing a worrisome third-and-long.

Book worked through his progressions well. He knew where his safety valves were. With more time, those skills would only grow, and he would better understand what Smythe sees in a defense.

Book did not play so well Notre Dame hopes he gets that playing time in the near future, but he did play well enough the Irish won’t need to panic should that situation arise.

Wimbush should be back after the bye week. As should everybody else.
Kelly claimed he debated playing Wimbush up until Saturday. The starter looked good Friday, very much wanting to play, but on game day, Kelly did not see the requisite “bounce” in Wimbush’s step as he recovers from a grade one right foot strain.

“Today he just didn’t have it in him,” Kelly said. “He just didn’t feel great. He didn’t have any bounce. Yesterday he looked good in our walk-through preparation and he had a lot of energy. It went back-and-forth.”

In other words, Wimbush should be good-to-go with a bye week’s rest ahead of him. The same goes for junior running back Dexter Williams. He did not even dress for the contest, following the same timeline as sophomore running back Tony Jones did a week ago coming back from an ankle sprain Kelly has compared to Williams’ now.

Junior running back Josh Adams had another short day, partly due to dehydration. Junior receiver Equanimeous St. Brown also saw limited action thanks to cramping. Anyone worried about senior linebacker Nyles Morgan need not do so: The captain suffered a stinger in the third quarter and was back to full health by game’s end. None of those should linger past, well, past Sunday, frankly.

Senior right tackle Alex Bars suffered an ankle sprain, but Kelly made it clear it was not a high ankle sprain. Traditionally speaking, that is considered a good thing.

But if Bars is out, Hunter Bivin will not be the answer.
When Bars first went to the sideline, fifth-year offensive lineman Hunter Bivin stepped in at right guard, as would be expected. Then Bivin committed two penalties within three plays to knock Notre Dame out of an ideal first-and-goal from the four-yard line. His day ended.

The Irish shifted sophomore Tommy Kraemer from his timeshare at right tackle, allowing freshman Robert Hainsey to take over those duties full-time.

This personnel development is worth remembering for two reasons: Obviously, if the ankle plagues Bars down the line, this will be the alignment deployed. Beyond that, it speaks to Hainsey’s rapid development. If he could not be counted on at right tackle, Kraemer would need to remain there. Bivin would then be the best option available at right guard, no matter how inconsistent he may be.

In the long-run, an argument can be made Kraemer’s best future is at guard. Hainsey’s emergence makes that more of a possibility, one that just might bring the beginnings of a consideration of a smile to Notre Dame offensive line coach Harry Hiestand’s face.

Hey, look, that’s Alizé Mack chipping away.

Junior tight end Alizé Mack moved the chains on four of his six catches during Notre Dame’s 33-10 win at North Carolina. (Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)

The junior tight end was targeted 10 times, catching six of them for 38 yards. Just more than three dozen yards and no scores may sound like another underwhelming stat line. That would be too simple of a reading, and an incorrect one.

Four of Mack’s catches yielded first downs, including a fourth-and-one conversion and a third-and-two conversion. This is the consistent production expected of a tight end presenting the target Mack does.

Entering the weekend, he had caught six passes of fewer than 15 yards. Those receptions hold merit, much merit. At North Carolina, Mack matched that total.

Chunks of 32 or 33 yards may be preferable, but they cannot be counted on. Gains of seven, six and even three yards are the plays that keep drives moving down the field.

All good things must end.

CHAPEL HILL, NC – OCTOBER 07: Nick Polino #58 of the North Carolina Tar Heels dives for a fumble forced by Te’von Coney #4 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish during the game at Kenan Stadium on October 7, 2017 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. (Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)

Two stats had become the preferred methods of illustrating just how different these Irish are from last year’s version. Notre Dame had scored on all 22 trips to the red zone this season, and the Irish had scored touchdowns after 10 of 11 forced turnovers, the one exception coming less than a minute before halftime.

Both storylines became cluttered this weekend. A trip to the red zone resulted in one of Book’s aforementioned interceptions. That stat line now stands at scores on 24 of 25 trips with 21 touchdowns. It remains hardly something to scoff at.

Of the three Tar Heels turnovers, only one resulted in any Notre Dame points, and that was just a field goal. Nonetheless, the Irish have now outscored their opponents off turnovers by a whopping margin of 73-10.

C.J. Holmes joins the running back fray.

Junior running back Deon McIntosh played a key part in Notre Dame maintaining possession for 12:16 of the fourth quarter. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

If sophomore running back Deon McIntosh continues to turn mop-up duty into a starring role — taking 12 carries for 124 yards and two touchdowns against the Tar Heels — then freshman C.J. Holmes will be stuck as the fifth running back on Notre Dame’s depth chart. However, a week ago that designation would have been nominal only. Now, it is a sincere description.

Holmes took eight carries for 32 yards in his first collegiate action, also participating on at least three of the Irish kicking units.

With Adams, Williams and Jones all tending to battered ankles already, Holmes may be needed yet this year, fifth running back or not.

Things To Learn: How injured is Wimbush; Can Mack and/or Stepherson provide reliability?

Associated Press
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The most notable item to learn this weekend is rather obvious: How is Brandon Wimbush’s foot?

The junior quarterback injured his right foot at some point Saturday after 5 p.m. ET. That much is known. How the grade one strain will affect him moving forward is the unknown.

Irish coach Brian Kelly said Wimbush was cleared to run Wednesday. The next update should come yet this evening during Kelly’s weekly post-practice Thursday update. For fun’s sake, let’s ballpark today’s odds of Kelly describing Wimbush as a game-time decision at -170, as cleared to play at +150 and as ruled out for this weekend at +250. In other words, today’s update will likely be of the non-update variety.

RELATED READING: Wimbush “day-to-day” with soft tissue right foot injury

That would bring this watch to Saturday’s pregame warmups at 2:30 p.m. ET, give or take. (Kickoff this week will be a few minutes past 3:30 p.m. ET on ABC.)

If Wimbush starts, he may not need to make many plays. North Carolina could not be much further from the Tar Heels that won 11 games in 2015. They are but a loss vs. Virginia (Oct. 14) and a defeat at Pittsburgh (Nov. 9) from looking at the prospect of winning only two or three games this season. Yes, injuries have played a role in those struggles, but such is football and such is sport. (North Carolina still has to travel to both Virginia Tech and North Carolina State while also hosting Miami.)

It is then easy to think, “Wimbush should not play. Throw in the backup. Surely he can do enough to get the win before the bye week. Let Wimbush rest and recover.”

Yes, sophomore quarterback Ian Book should be able to meet that standard, but Wimbush still needs the playing time, experience in various game situations and more repetitions in the passing game. There is only one way to get these things, and that is to play.

If Wimbush’s foot precludes Saturday action, then the bye week quickly becomes the most-pivotal week of the Irish season. If he plays in a limited fashion against the Tar Heels, then it can be surmised the walking boot is just a precaution for a truly minor injury and his development should be able to proceed without much inhibition.

With Wimbush possibly hampered or Book starting in his place, how much will Notre Dame rely on Josh Adams?
Kelly began beating the drum for the junior running back to receive more recognition immediately after the 52-17 Irish victory over Miami (OH) on Saturday. Following that with a game plan centered on Adams makes logical sense, but Notre Dame’s offense has already primarily featured the run game.

Notre Dame fans are very familiar with junior running back Josh Adams (No. 33), though they do not know junior tight end Alizé Mack as well just yet. Could Adams gain national attention and Mack more local notice against North Carolina on Saturday? (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

With Adams as healthy as he will be the rest of the year, season, perhaps it is time to get him a few carries from inside the five-yard line. The Irish have 10 touchdowns from that range this season. Only one has been in Adams’ hands.

RELATED READING: Adams moves up Notre Dame record books while awaiting national attention

In a nationally-televised afternoon slot, Adams rushing for 170-plus yards with multiple touchdowns would likely get him some of the notice Kelly feels the workhorse deserves.

Will this be the week Alizé Mack makes a sustainable impact?
Spring and preseason practice always overly-hype a few players. The junior tight end certainly received great reviews from both those sessions, but his 11 catches for 116 yards to date have not quite lived up to those laudings.

This is not to say Mack was not worth the hype. Between his size and speed, he is a walking mismatch. He has five catches of at least 15 yards, including one each of 32 and 33. Do the quick math now. While Mack has been good for a handful of big-chunk plays, his other six catches have gained a total of five yards. The Irish have not been able to maximize Mack’s possibilities. That could be a result of Wimbush’s inaccuracy, Mack’s rust or simply the five-game sample size.

If Notre Dame takes to blowing out the Tar Heels, working on the connection between Mack and Wimbush, or even focusing on building Mack any momentum, would pay benefits in the season’s second half.

If North Carolina keeps it close, then Mack could be a crucial third-down piece. Nationally, third downs are converted at a rate of 37.4 percent. Notre Dame has been successful on 41.3 percent of its third downs. The Tar Heels allow first downs 42.2 percent of the time.

RELATED READING: And In That Corner … 

In those particular spots, Mack could excel, keeping the Irish offense on the field, the first step to putting up a fourth tally of 40-plus points.

Was another week of practice the difference for Kevin Stepherson?
Probably not, frankly. Junior Equanimeous St. Brown and sophomore Chase Claypool have separated themselves from the rest of the receivers, and sophomore Kevin Stepherson is not about to join their ranks after only two weeks of practice and one catch against the RedHawks.

Akin to Mack, though, a rout would provide the chance to establish Stepherson some opportunities to move past any lethargy and then establish momentum. As much as Notre Dame has relished relying on the run thus far, at some point a passing situation will arise. Perhaps USC will take a two-touchdown lead into the fourth quarter. Maybe North Carolina State will completely shut down Adams & Co. Both scenarios are very plausible, and both would require the Irish to produce through the air.

Having some proven options in addition to St. Brown and Claypool will increase the odds of such an attack succeeding. Mack and Stepherson remain the most-dynamic possibilities for those roles, but they also remain the most-unproven in 2017, behind the likes of fifth-year receiver Cam Smith, junior receiver Chris Finke and fifth-year tight end Durham Smythe.

Against the Trojans and the Wolfpack, the Irish coaching staff will defer to those who have produced consistently already this season. Saturday is the last chance to establish that track record before a rather competitive four-game run leads into the always interesting matchup with Navy.

Why is this all about the offense?
North Carolina may find some offensive success this weekend, but it is hard to envision it being frequent. At this point, the Notre Dame defense is increasingly a known commodity. Its greatest weakness shows against vertical passing games. The Tar Heels do not feature such.

Sunday Notre Dame Notebook: Kelly on Wimbush’s accuracy, receivers’ hands & needed secondary improvements

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Notre Dame’s greatest successes this season have come when relying on its running game. It would stand to reason the Irish would turn to their ground attack to set the tone from the outset of a pivotal matchup against a physical opponent. Instead, Notre Dame opened with the pass in its 38-18 victory over Michigan State on Saturday. The first five plays from scrimmage were passing attempts from junior quarterback Brandon Wimbush, completing four of them for 62 yards.

This was all very intentional, especially a week after Wimbush struggled with accuracy.

“Getting the quarterback off with some quick throws, some easy throws to get into a rhythm was important,” Irish coach Brian Kelly said Sunday. “I wanted to make sure [offensive coordinator Chip Long] got some openers for [Wimbush] in his first nine plays that were high percentage completions for him to get into a rhythm, which he did.

“… It was orchestrated or planned or constructed that way, whatever word you want to use.”

Wimbush finished 14-of-20 for 173 yards and one touchdown, a marked improvement from his 11-of-24 for 96 yards at Boston College.

“It’s not uncommon when you go through the volume you do in preseason camp and all the throwing that sometimes the ball drops a little bit,” Kelly said. “… [Wimbush] is throwing the ball perfectly.

“We wanted to get him some completions, no question, and we set him up that way.”

A few of Wimbush’s completions were aided by excellent catches by his targets. Fifth-year tight end Durham Smythe, junior receiver Equanimeous St. Brown, junior running back Dexter Williams and sophomore receiver Chase Claypool all made difficult catches. Following the 49-20 victory over the Eagles last week, Kelly had been critical of both Wimbush’s accuracy and the lack of playmaking from the receiver corps.

“I knew that we needed to step up our play in supporting [Wimbush],” Kelly said. “He had to throw it better. We had to catch it better.”

With that in mind, Kelly and the coaching staff made it a point in this week’s practices to remind the receivers a pass needs two participants. The onus was not on only Wimbush to improve.

“There wasn’t a time where if a ball was not caught there was not a comment about how important it is for us to focus on the football and catch that football,” Kelly said.

“… We’ve got some guys that are gaining some confidence out there. I think you’ll see a better rapport as the season goes on here between Brandon and the receivers and confidence grow in that regard.”

Josh Adams & ankle ‘stiffness’
Notre Dame was already without sophomore running back Tony Jones due to a sprained ankle suffered a week ago. In the second half Saturday, junior running back Josh Adams took some time off, as well. Kelly said Adams felt “some stiffness” in his ankle at halftime, which led to a precautionary X-ray. The X-ray did not reveal any issues, but the Irish were content to rely on Williams unless it was “absolutely necessary” to reinsert Adams. With a three-possession Notre Dame lead, that situation never arose.

Adams handled a total of two rushes in the second half, one for a loss of a yard and the second for a three-yard gain. He finished with nine carries for 56 yards.

Room to improve
Michigan State attempted 53 passes, 12 more than the most the Irish had seen yet this year. This was in part due to Notre Dame’s quick and sizable lead, and it was in part the Spartans’ game plan, expecting the Irish to be ready for a known running focus.

Despite limiting the Spartans to only 6.51 yards per pass attempt, the influx of opportunities to defend the pass showed Kelly and his staff improvements waiting to be made in the secondary.

“We have to play with a little bit more of a sense of urgency in terms of down-and-distance, recognizing game situations,” Kelly said. “There is some improvement there for us.

“We have to do a better job with understanding passing off routes, underneath coverage, inside-out on slant routes in terms of down-and-distance.”

In other words, the Notre Dame secondary has yet to genuinely need to know where the first-down line is on a given down. On a second-and-seven, the concern is as much about a 15-yard route as it is a six-yard route. On a third-and-seven, the defensive back needs to be prepared for the seven-yard route more than anything else, expecting the pass to come in that area, while still protecting against the big play.

Exposure to those situations helps build that awareness. Saturday night provided some of that exposure, and now the Irish will set to developing those instincts.

“[It] gave us a real good snapshot of the things we have to focus in on and work to improve this week.”

On Miami of Ohio
If Notre Dame does not make those improvements, Redhawks senior quarterback Gus Ragland is the type of passer who can reap the rewards. Before the season, Kelly often described the first four Irish opponents as physical foes, ground-oriented. Now through those four, the focus will shift somewhat toward defending the pass. Ragland will be the first test.

To date, he has completed 52.1 percent of his passes this season for 881 yards and eight touchdowns compared to two interceptions. Ragland has averaged 7.53 yards per passing attempt.

In a 31-14 win over Central Michigan this weekend, Ragland threw for 217 yards and two touchdowns on only 11-of-19 passing.

The Redhawks are led by former Notre Dame assistant and longtime Kelly confidante Chuck Martin.

“We have a lot of respect for Chuck,” Kelly said. “Obviously I know him quite well. He’ll have his team ready.”

Notre Dame rushes past Boston College and record books

Associated Press
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Winning if by ground, losing if by air. Thus, seven by ground, none by air.

That is, Notre Dame scored all seven of its touchdowns via rush in its 49-20 victory over Boston College on Saturday. After struggling through the first half relying on both the passing and ground games, the Irish held a mere 14-10 lead at the break. They then found and stuck to their strength to pull away with increasing ease.

“We didn’t stop the run,” Eagles coach Steve Addazio said. “We did not stop the run, and that was a huge deal in that game.”

Yes, yes it was.

“We didn’t make a lot of plays in the first half,” Irish coach Brian Kelly said. “We came in at halftime and went up to the offensive line and said, ‘Look, we need you to take over this football game. You’re our veteran group.’

“They really responded. Really proud of the way they controlled the line of scrimmage in the second half.”

It may be difficult to overstate how the afternoon shifted once Notre Dame devoted itself to the running game. At halftime, the Irish had converted only three of nine third-down attempts, also failing on one fourth-down attempt. They had outgained Boston College by only 43 yards, 271 to 228.

Beginning with the third Irish drive of the second half, the focus was singular, and the scoreboard’s gradual changes reflected it. Prior to that point, Notre Dame clung to a 14-13 lead, its defense holding Boston College in check while the offense sputtered. For example, the first two Irish drives of the half combined for seven plays, 11 yards and one turnover.

Alternating with those two drives, the Notre Dame defense prevented the Eagles from capitalizing on a turnover — holding to only a field goal — and then forced a turnover on downs in Irish territory.

With the ball back, the third Notre Dame drive after halftime gained 65 of its 70 yards on the ground, seven of the nine plays being designed rushes, including junior quarterback Brandon Wimbush finding a lane in the defense for 46 yards and a first-and-goal. Three plays later, sophomore running back Tony Jones scored from a yard out, and the rout commenced.

“It all started with our offensive line in terms of being able to run the football,” Kelly said.

Wimbush finished with 207 yards on 21 carries. Adams took 18 rushes for 229 yards. Junior running back Dexter Williams chipped in 50 yards and two scores on only six carries. Jones finished with five yards and a touchdown on two attempts. Even sophomore Deon McIntosh found 24 yards on four carries.

The Irish finished the day nine-of-18 on third-down attempts and outgained Boston College by 211 yards, 611 to 400.

TURNING POINT OF THE GAME
Either one of those defensive stands could qualify here. Boston College could have, perhaps should have, retaken the lead on both occasions. For that matter, the Eagles could have retaken the lead and then subsequently extended it. Keeping in mind the complete ineffectiveness of Notre Dame’s passing attack Saturday, a theoretical two-possession deficit may have been too much to overcome.

The first threat came when Wimbush fumbled on the fourth play after the break. That drive began with the potential of the Irish going up two possessions themselves. Instead, the turnover gifted Boston College possession only 32 yards from the end zone. A quick rush from junior running back Jon Hilliman brought the Eagles into the red zone. At that point, Notre Dame’s defense seemed to decide enough was enough. The following three plays netted Boston College negative three yards (including a false start penalty), leading to a successful 41-yard field goal.

The Irish still had a lead, the aforementioned 14-13 margin.

But, again, the offense stalled. On first-and-10, Wimbush found junior running back Josh Adams for a whopping one-yard reception. On second-and-long, Adam was stopped in the backfield. He never had a chance at gaining the needed 14 yards on third down. The three-and-out again gave the Eagles beneficial field position, again put the defense in a difficult position and again stalled any version of momentum.

A soon-to-follow fourth-and-one on the Notre Dame 30-yard line showed just how little the defense seemed to mind.

Freshman defensive tackle Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa won the initial push on the line of scrimmage, invalidating Boston College’s intended point of attack. The rest of the Irish defense swarmed Hilliman — senior linebacker Nyles Morgan and junior linebacker Te’von Coney were credited with the tackle. The danger was averted.

“Our defense really ignited us with a fourth down stop, got some energy,” Kelly said. “When you make plays, obviously that creates an energy, and we were able to score. I thought that was a pretty big turning point in the second half.”

Notre Dame had the ball back.

Commence rout.

Shaun Crawford’s interception helped stymied an Boston College comeback hopes long enough for the Irish offense to genuinely pull away during Notre Dame’s 49-20 victory Saturday. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

OVERLOOKED POINT OF THE GAME
Again, look to the defense. In fact, look to the possession immediately following Jones’ touchdown. The Eagles were trailing only 21-13. Freshman quarterback Anthony Brown looked for a mid-range route, perhaps one that could break loose for a big gain, positioning Boston College to come within one point or tie up the game.

Instead, Irish junior cornerback Shaun Crawford won the battle for the pass, pulling in his second career interception.

“We went over those plays a number of times throughout the week, and I was in perfect position,” said Crawford, who added another interception and a fumble recovery by the end of the day. “… We knew they had nothing to lose, they were going to try all their tricks, and [in the] second half we made adjustments. We came out strong.”

Following Crawford’s first interception, Adams took the next snap for 36 yards to the Eagles 39-yard line. Wimbush immediately connected with fifth-year tight end Durham Smythe for 33 yards to get to the six-yard line. Two plays later, the score was 28-13.

Rout in progress.

PLAYER OF THE GAME
Wimbush found the end zone four times, but this honor should go to Adams. His 18 carries for 229 yards included runs of 64 and 65 yards, setting up two of Wimbush’s touchdowns.

The second of those came a few minutes before the half, leading to the 14-10 advantage. If Notre Dame had entered the break trailing 10-7, the locker room psyche would have undoubtedly been much different than it was.

Adams’ run restored some of the Irish confidence.

STAT OF THE GAME

Brandon Wimbush’s fourth and final rushing touchdown Saturday pushed Notre Dame’s rushing statistics over the top into historical territory. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

Notre Dame rushed 51 times for 515 yards. That equals an average of 10.09 yards per carry. A few items to note about those numbers.

— The Irish threw for only 96 yards on 27 attempts, an average of 3.56 yards per attempt.

— The modern-era record for Irish yards per carry in one game was 10.0, set in 1942 when Notre Dame rushed 25 times for 250 yards in a 13-13 tie against the Naval Station Great Lakes. That record, obviously, is no longer.

— The modern-era record for Irish yards in one game is 597 yards, set in 1969 against Navy. Anytime that mark warrants pertinent mention, it is a reflection of just how strong the Notre Dame ground attack was for a day.

— Per Notre Dame, and fitting with common sense, this was the first time in program history two individuals rushed for more than 200 yards in one game.

“The offensive line did a [great] job again and opened up lanes for myself, Josh Adams, Dexter and Tony, and even Deon got in there at the end and got a couple yards there,” Wimbush said. “When you’re running in the open field, it feels great to open up a little bit and obviously have that red jersey off of you.”

QUOTE OF THE AFTERNOON
Heading into Saturday afternoon, much time had been spent discussing how tough Boston College seems to always play Notre Dame. Recent results prove some validity to the point. When mentioned early in the week, Kelly met the thesis with a “Heck yeah [they do.]”

With that background, the thumping stands out.

“Playing Boston College is always a challenge for us at Notre Dame,” Kelly said afterward. “It’s always one that we expect their very, very best, and we get it …

“We were able to break them, and it’s hard to do.”

QUESTIONABLE COACHING DECISION OF THE AFTERNOON
Boston College senior defensive end Harold Landry came off the field for entire series at a time in an apparent attempt to keep him rested for a productive fourth quarter. Seemingly whenever that occurred, Notre Dame found space for a long run. Both of Adams’ 60-plus yarders came with Landry sidelined. When Wimbush broke loose for that 46-yard run to set up the third Irish touchdown, Landry watched from his coach’s vantage point.

Not only did his absence play a part in Notre Dame’s first three touchdowns, but the rest also did not produce its desired effect. When Wimbush opted not to shovel a pass to senior tight end Nic Weishar and instead race for a 65-yard touchdown, his fourth score of the day, the greatest obstacle was Landry. The NFL prospect was waiting in the backfield, likely playing a role in Wimbush not tossing to Weishar.

Rest or no rest, Landry did not slow Wimbush.

SCORING SUMMARY

First Quarter
7:52 —Boston College field goal. Colton Lichtenberg from 38 yards. Boston College 3, Notre Dame 0. (10 plays, 32 yards, 4:16)
6:28 — Notre Dame touchdown. Brandon Wimbush two-yard rush. Justin Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 7, Boston College 3. (4 plays, 75 yards, 1:24)

Second Quarter
11:59 — Boston College touchdown. Charlie Callinan 22-yard reception from Anthony Brown. Lichtenberg PAT good. Boston College 10, Notre Dame 7. (9 plays, 85 yards, 3:01)
1:57 — Notre Dame touchdown. Wimbush one-yard rush. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 14, Boston College 10. (7 plays, 92 yards, 1:55)

Third Quarter
11:25 — Boston College field goal. Lichtenberg from 41 yards. Notre Dame 14, Boston College 13. (5 plays, 9 yards, 2:19)
5:04 — Notre Dame touchdown. Tony Jones one-yard rush. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 21, Boston College 13. (9 plays, 70 yards, 2:36)
2:38 — Notre Dame touchdown. Wimbush three-yard rush. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 28, Boston College 13. (4 plays, 75 yards, 1:34)

Fourth Quarter
13:41 — Notre Dame touchdown. Wimbush 65-yard rush. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 35, Boston College 13. (5 plays, 83 yards, 1:59)
9:02 — Boston College touchdown. Callinan 14-yard reception from Brown. Lichtenberg PAT good. Notre Dame 35, Boston College 20. (14 plays, 75 yards, 4:39)
6:23 — Notre Dame touchdown. Dexter Williams three-yard rush. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 42, Boston College 20. (2 plays, 35 yards, 0:28)
4:57 — Notre Dame touchdown. Williams 15-yard rush. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 49, Boston College 20. (5 plays, 33 yards, 1:16)

Kelly on Georgia’s fans and offensive line; injury update & more

Associated Press
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Brian Kelly would inevitably prefer Notre Dame Stadium be filled with Irish fans wearing blue, green and gold, no one else in sight. He also recognizes that is unrealistic, especially this weekend.

“We know there’s going to be some black and some red in the stands,” the Notre Dame head coach said Thursday. “8,000 tickets is probably what they were allotted, could be times two. We’ll be ready for that.”

A quick search of the leading secondary market websites as of Friday morning indicates the cheapest pair of tickets available cost $583.53 per ticket, in the 22nd row of the northeast end zone’s upper bowl.

“We’ve seen how Texas travelled in their first time up here, we’ve seen Nebraska in their first time up here,” Kelly said. “So that won’t affect us. We’ll have a pretty good fan base here, too.”

The Bulldogs are led by their two senior running backs, Nick Chubb and Sony Michel, a fact Kelly has kept at the forefront of conversation all week. Two days before kickoff, he furthered the attention to their running game by praising freshman right tackle Andrew Thomas. The 6-foot-5, 320-pounder joined an offensive line returning only two starters, but his emergence immediately solidified the right side.

“You can see him flash in just one game how good he’s going to be,” Kelly said. “… It’s a very solid offensive line, one that has some experience. Now, I think on the right side with that right tackle, he changes things a little bit for them.”

Kelly and his coaching staff, namely offensive line coach Harry Hiestand, pursued Thomas a bit in the last recruiting cycle, only to see him stay in his homestate.

“We really liked his ability to communicate effectively,” Kelly said. “Wide-eyed, really liked him in person. Didn’t seem like the moment was too big for him, all the external factors. It’s easy to see a big guy, but big guys don’t necessarily translate into great players. He’s going to be a great player.”

Of course, Kelly still took the time to once again acknowledge the threat of Chubb and Michel.

“When you start to look at offensive lines, they have two outstanding running backs that can make up for a lot.”

Injury update
To date, the Irish injury listing has been short and largely lacking long-term concerns aside from senior defensive tackle Daniel Cage missing the season recovering from concussion symptoms and knee surgery, and junior defensive tackle Elijah Taylor recovering from a Lisfranc fracture. After one game, that remains the case.

Graduate student tight end Durham Smythe has been cleared from the concussion protocol and will not be limited at all Saturday.

Junior defensive tackle Micah Dew-Treadway will rejoin the action after missing the season opener due to a slight knee sprain.

“We’ll see what he can do to add to the rotation,” Kelly said.

That defensive tackle rotation featured two freshmen last week in Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa and Kurt Hinish. Neither seemed worse for wear this week, despite seeing notable snap counts.

“The benefit of both those guys playing in the first game against Temple with a pretty good offensive line, they’ll be better for it,” Kelly said. “Their volume was pretty high in terms of the volume of snaps that they took. It was a valuable first game experience for them, so they’ll continue to be in the mix.”

Lawsuit by former player
Former Irish linebacker Doug Randolph filed a lawsuit against the University on Sept. 1, also naming Kelly as a defendant, as well as Notre Dame head trainer Rob Hunt. Randolph alleges medical results were withheld from him, results indicating he should not have continued playing in 2015 due to long-term medical concerns.

Since diagnosed with spinal stenosis, Randolph alleges he “suffered complete numbness in all four extremities” in his final career game, the Fiesta Bowl against Ohio State on Jan. 1, 2016. When he informed Hunt of the symptom, the lawsuit claims Randolph was told to continue playing and “get back in the game.”

The following spring, Randolph’s scholarship became a medical hardship and he spent the 2016 season as a student assistant.

Kelly said Thursday he was surprised by the legal matter, though he largely deferred to a University statement.

“I know the kind of quality healthcare that we provide,” Kelly said. “We have outstanding doctors and trainers. That’s our mission here, to provide the very best healthcare to our student athletes, and whatever is in their best interest. That’s important to note, as well.”

University vice president of public affairs and communications Paul Browne said in an email the University feels the lawsuit lacks merit.

“We will respond in full to these claims in court, but what we can say with certainty is that nothing is more important to Notre Dame than the safety and wellbeing of our students,” he said. “With that in mind, we believe our athletics doctors and trainers are second to none and we are completely confident that these health-care professionals provided proper medical care to the plaintiff in this case. We are equally confident that the allegations made in this lawsuit are baseless.”