Tyler Eifert

AP

Monday Morning Leftovers: Notre Dame amid NFL roster cuts; Good for USC & more

19 Comments

You made it. Football happened. It was as glorious as you remembered, wasn’t it? I hope the wings were properly-marinated, as well.

— While college football was providing a level of drama which was greatly enjoyed but will likely be surpassed in a week, the NFL was working through a much more personal version of dramatics. The “final” round of roster cuts came this weekend, bringing each NFL team to the 53-man depth chart it will carry into the season.

Among former Irish players trying to make their first roster, defensive lineman Isaac Rochell made his way onto the Los Angeles Chargers, though his spot remains tenuous. The quotation marks a paragraph prior around final are because these rosters are obviously constantly in flux. In Los Angeles, defensive end Tenny Palepoi will return from suspension (violation of league policy on performance enhancing substances) one week into the season. When he is added to the roster, it could be at Rochell’s expense.

Drafted in the seventh round, Rochell is joined by undrafted linebacker James Onwualu on the Chargers’ roster. Undrafted cornerback Cole Luke found a spot with the Carolina Panthers.

Defensive-turned-offensive tackle Jarron Jones, also undrafted, did not make the cut with the New York Giants. Rather than spend time with their practice squad, as expected, in hopes he can bring his blocking skills to an NFL-level, Giants beat writer Dan Duggan reports Jones has signed with the Seattle Seahawks practice squad.

— Perhaps the USC vs. Western Michigan game was well beyond dramatic with three minutes remaining and the Trojans up 17. It was then, though, that the weekend’s most memorable moment occurred.

You have undoubtedly seen this by now, but reminding of it cannot hurt. After an interception returned for a touchdown USC walk-on long snapper Jake Olson fired a perfect snap for the converted extra point. Why in the world would that be memorable? Olson is blind.

Just for making that happen, perhaps Notre Dame fans should allow USC is not entirely bad.

Lost in the moment is the praise deserved by Western Michigan and, specifically, Broncos coach Tim Lester. Trojans coach Clay Helton called Lester on Thursday wanting to find a way to get Olson his moment. Lester agreed if the situation presented itself, he would tell his kick block unit to relent on the attempt, but only if the game was already at an agreed upon level of lopsided.

In exchange, USC would not rush Western Michigan’s first point after attempt. That is especially bold, ceding a point at the game’s outset.

— That touchdown, courtesy of Trojans safety Marvel Tell, made the score 49-31. Somewhere I recently read someone predict USC would exceed a projected tally of 43 points this weekend. That same person also mused Georgia should have been favored by more than two touchdowns against Appalachian State and the Boston College vs. Northern Illinois game would not provide the fireworks necessary to reach a combined total of 51 points.

Georgia beat Appalachian State by 21, and that latter game notched only 43 points.

— Injuries are part of football, but it is still always preferable not to see star quarterbacks on national title contenders lost for the year on the opening weekend. Florida State’s Deondre Francis reportedly injured a season-ending patellar tendon injury, leaving the Seminoles to turn to freshman James Blackman.

Deondre Francis (Getty Images)

Blackman, or classmate Bailey Hockman, will have only one game to get ready for some of the ACC’s best. Florida State hosts Louisiana-Monroe this weekend before Miami arrives Sept. 16 followed a week later by redemption-seeking North Carolina State.

Fortunately for the Seminoles, the three-game home stand should provide the freshmen some level of comfort.

— Allow me to be the buzzkill. Excuse me while I ruin the fun. I am here to end the party.

UCLA quarterback Josh Rosen’s fake spike-touchdown to complete a historic comeback over Texas A&M last night was unnecessary, superfluous, pointless and inconsequential. I am not referring to the touchdown itself. It delivered the Bruins a win. I am referring to the fake spike.

Josh Rosen celebrates the winning touchdown Sunday night. (Getty Images)

The clock was not ticking. The previous play, a fourth-and-six from the 20-yard line, ended with UCLA running back Soso Jamabo out of bounds, having converted the first down off a pass into the flat. When Rosen faked the spike, the A&M defenders should have ignored it.

Any Aggies falling for it is more a reflection on their game awareness and coaching than it is on Rosen’s savviness.

For that matter, was it even a catch?

— For Irish fans, Friday night in Boca Raton was a reminder of a Saturday six years ago. The Florida Atlantic debut of Lane Kiffin was elongated by three lightning delays, finally ending at 1:47 a.m. Per the Sun-Sentinel’s Matt DeFranks, there was never a conversation about halting the game prior to completion, even though Navy seemed to have the result well in hand.

On some level, that makes sense. It was a Friday night, there were no classes to get to. Kiffin and the Owls should want to play to win, that is the entire premise of the sport. It is Florida, quick rain storms are the norm.

But it was an hour past midnight with the game clock stopped. One has to wonder at what point those conversations would have begun.

— I have my one and only fantasy football draft tomorrow night. I am woefully behind on research, but I know this much: I will not be drafting any former Irish players with the possible exception of Cincinnati Bengals tight end Tyler Eifert.

It is a two-quarterback fantasy league, something I have long advocated for, but now that only puts me even further behind in preparations.

— As of this typing, no sign yet of a Notre Dame vs. Georgia spread. Possible season-ending injuries to star quarterbacks on national title contenders will often delay such projections, and such is the case with Bulldogs starter Jacob Eason. With that in mind, this is a unique chance to guess the line. Let’s go with Notre Dame by 4.5 points.

UPDATE: With the news freshman quarterback Jack Fromm will start for Georgia, the line has opened with the Irish as 6.5-point favorites this weekend.

— Top-25 polls will come out tomorrow, delayed this week by the elongated weekend. (Thanks Labor Day. That is also why this post is up a few hours later than usual. Why rush on a holiday?) There will not be a separate post tomorrow to inform anyone of the inevitable: Notre Dame will be in the top 25.

Take the initial AP poll, for example. The Irish were No. 28, if counting through the Others Receiving Votes. Nos. 22 and 23 West Virginia and Texas, respectively, both lost. No. 19 South Florida struggled, again, this time against Stony Brook.

No. 26 TCU beat up on Jackson State. No. 27 Utah enjoyed a casual evening against North Dakota. The Irish victory over Temple is far more impressive than either of those.

Saying Goodbye: Five things I learned writing Inside the Irish

Property of the University of Notre Dame
133 Comments

As Lloyd Christmas said, “I hate goodbyes.”But after eight seasons of covering the day-to-day happenings of Notre Dame football, it’s time to say just that.

It’s crazy to think that it’s almost been a decade since I talked the good people of NBC Sports Digital into paying me money to cover the daily comings and goings of the Irish football team. And it’s even crazier that come this Friday, I won’t wake up wondering what I’ll be writing about.

But, it’s time. After eight seasons, two head coaches, 65 wins, 37 losses and one imaginary girlfriend, I’m turning in my wings.

So let’s do this the only way I know how. Here are five things I learned writing Inside the Irish.

 

No matter how fair you try to be, you’re always going to have favorite players. 

My introduction to Notre Dame football was a memorable one. Big-box speakers blared down the fourth floor hallway of Stanford Hall, a rude early-morning awakening for an 18-year-old freshman who was still a little groggy from the night before. I still hadn’t seen a football game in Notre Dame Stadium, though I did manage to wander through the stadium gates and down the tunnel the night before, running phantom pass patterns on that shaggy grass field after a night of exquisite Keystone Lights.

The next day, the Irish beat the defending Rose Bowl champs. And a very young Keith Arnold wondered if all Saturdays would be as magical as this one.

They wouldn’t be. But that doesn’t mean they weren’t all interesting.

The above story is license to expand my very first (and last) All-Inside the Irish Team, building a roster of my favorite players to man their respective positions since the virus that is Notre Dame football took hold of me.

 

The All-Inside the Irish Team

QB: Brady Quinn
RB: Autry Denson
RB: Darius Walker
WR: Golden Tate
WR: Michael Floyd
WR: Jeff Samardzija
TE: Tyler Eifert
LT: Zack Martin
G: Quenton Nelson
C: Jeff Faine
G: Chris Watt
RT: Ryan Harris

DE: Justin Tuck
DT: Trevor Laws
DT: Louis Nix
DE: Stephon Tuitt
LB: Jaylon Smith
LB: Manti Te’o
LB: Kory Minor
CB: Shane Walton
S: Harrison Smith
S: Tommy Zbikowski
CB: KeiVarae Russell

P: Hunter Smith
K: David Ruffer
Returner: Julius Jones
X-Factor: Tommy Rees

 

For as close as they got, it’s hard not to wonder what could have been. 

For me, the best three minutes of covering the Irish were the three minutes before kickoff of the BCS National Championship game. I’ll remember that moment in the press box forever. I could’ve run through a wall, I was so filled with excitement.

The next three minutes? Not quite as good. But after eight years of watching the ups and downs, I’m still left with some serious “what could have been” moments.

What if Jimmy Clausen and Golden Tate stuck around for their senior seasons? What if Dayne Crist never got hurt? What if Aaron Lynch didn’t leave? Or Eddie Vanderdoes didn’t want to see his grandma? Or Tee Shepard made it to spring ball? What if Brian Kelly didn’t hire Brian VanGorder?

What if a certain unnamed student trainer didn’t give a little bit too much help or if Everett Golson didn’t take accounting class? Or the 2015 team didn’t live out a Final Destination movie?

Follow a team close enough, and you’ll drive yourself crazy wondering about these scenarios. But at Notre Dame—a school where you’re always going to be on a razor’s edge—the one thing that hit me was the Sisyphean nature if it all. Just when it seemed like the Irish were close to getting that boulder to the top of the mountain, it always found a way to come barreling back down.

 

No matter how long I do it, I’ll never understand the people who can’t find a way to enjoy it. 

Apologies in advance, but let me get this one off my chest. There’s a passion that surrounds Notre Dame football. But for a very vocal group, that passion has gotten demented, an elephant in the room that’s hard to ignore—even when you’re trying your best to do it.

I’ll never understand that. How people who have all the enthusiasm in the world for Notre Dame football have gotten it so twisted that they’ve forgotten that this is supposed to be fun.

It’s sports.

I won’t miss this part. The hard-liners who hold kids and coaches to a standard so far outside the one that they have for themselves, or the ones who fail to understand that every Saturday one team leaves a winner and the other a loser—and sometimes that loser wears blue and gold.

Make no mistake, I know better than most that college football is big business. It’s helped me and my family earn a living, talking and writing about one team, every day, for eight years.  But for as good as it is when the team wins, the bad years are so much worse.

It’s hard not to draw parallels between the joyless cyber mob that infests Notre Dame football (and I’m sure many other programs) with the ones that turned this political season so toxic. The people who refuse to think there’s any nuance—that things either ARE or they AREN’T.

It’s hard to deal with people who believe that Notre Dame, if simply managed and operated by competent people, would still be the Notre Dame of the past. That if only Rockne, Leahy, Ara or Lou were in charge of the team, or Sorin, Moose or Father Ted were in the Main Building, things would be just fine.

Politics aside—and I truly mean that—nobody is going to Make Notre Dame Football Great Again. At least not how it used to be. And certainly not the echo chamber over at NDNation. So while that group will be very glad to be rid of me, know that—for the most part—the feeling is very mutual.

 

Enough doom and gloom. I’ll be eternally thankful for the community we built here—mostly because of you. 

I’ve met plenty of wonderful people because of this blog. I’ve even had people stop me on the streets of South Bend, a head-shaking occurrence still to this day, with the question, “Are you Keith Arnold?” Thankfully, it was for a good reason. Mainly, you read the blog.

So thanks to everybody who has played along—especially those who have lived below the fold. There is a large community of you that I will sincerely miss, even if I’m unwilling to single out any individual reader (other than my mom) for being better than the rest.

We’ve had some wonderful characters in the comment threads. Daily participants. Some who have come and gone. Some who have been banned and re-appeared. Even crazy disbarred lawyers with conspiracy theories.

The live blogs were fun. The tight finishes of the 2009 season were made even crazier when you saw the thousands of people feeding CoveritLive with their every thought. So were the (way too) occasional mailbag. Thanks to all for participating.

For as rough as I was above, there are so many people doing great work writing and podcasting about the Irish. Interesting, intelligent people who I am glad to call friends. There are too many people to single out, but whether they be premium websites that get by with subscribers or blogs run by people with a full-time job, there are too many people to single out, but it’s all really well done. Speaking as a daily-consumer of an unhealthy amount of Notre Dame coverage, it’s a wonderful time to be an Irish fan—4-8 season aside.

 

If I’ve learned anything these past eight years, it’s that Notre Dame does try to be different. 

If you want to get an eye-roll, go ahead and tell someone who doesn’t like the Irish that Notre Dame does it better than the rest. (Go ahead, it shouldn’t be hard to find someone.)

But as much as that statement makes my skin crawl—and I’m a proud alum—the more I dug deeper and deeper into the football team and Jack Swarbrick’s athletic department, the more comfortable I got saying that Notre Dame tried to do it right.

That doesn’t mean they always did.  In my time covering the team, I had to cover some terrible events—and had to ask some very difficult questions. But more often than not, I was always struck by the conscientious effort made to balance everything that goes into doing things the right way, challenging student-athletes to excel in a impressive academic environment while also attempting to compete for a national championship.

No matter what the NCAA tells me, I won’t forget the 2012 season. I won’t forget the moment when the Irish had the No. 1 Graduation Success Rate in the country and the No. 1 glowed proudly atop Grace Hall.

My thanks to the team and people who let me cover them. To those who let a guy living 2,000-plus miles away poke around and ask questions, even if sometimes they resulted in a story getting out that was purposely being kept under wraps. I’m guessing there were more than a few moments inside the Gug spent wondering how some guy with a laptop in Manhattan Beach found something out that he wasn’t supposed to know.

While I’m stepping away from blog, I won’t stop watching the games. And while my time with NBC is done (for now), we’re still thinking of ways for me to be involved with their always excellent coverage of the Irish.

So thanks again to everyone. I’ll be back here later this week to introduce you to the “new guy,” who you’ll soon like much better than the old one. And while shorter is usually better, anybody who has read this blog knows that’s never been one of my gifts.

Irish A-to-Z: Durham Smythe

AP
12 Comments

Notre Dame’s tight end depth chart is topped by Durham Smythe. And a season after suffering a hard-luck year, the senior hopes to pick up the slack Alizé Jones’ ineligibility leaves behind.

A capable blocker who also has the ability to get open down the field, Smythe’s hoping to finally put together a season where opportunity meets the senior head on. Entering his fourth year in the program, Smythe’s trajectory is similar to Torii Hunter’s, talent ahead of production thus far.

 

DURHAM SMYTHE
6’4.5″, 245 lbs.
Senior, TE, No. 80

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

An early commitment to in-state Texas, Smythe flipped to Notre Dame after getting to campus in January. He was a four-star prospect who also kicked the tires on a Stanford offer before choosing the Irish.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2013): Did not see action, preserving a year of eligibility.

Sophomore Season (2014): Played in all 13 games for the Irish. Made one catch, a seven-yarder against Arizona State.

Junior Season (2015): Started three games, the season-opener against Texas and Virginia before suffering two injuries that ended his regular season. Returned for the Fiesta Bowl, finishing the year with three catches, including a touchdown against Virginia.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

He never had a chance to live up to these modest expectations.

If Koyack caught 30 balls last season, I think we should put the ceiling around 20 for Smythe, especially considering the variety the Irish have at the position, not to mention the other weapons that exist in the passing game.

But maybe calibrating Smythe’s season by catches isn’t exactly the fairest way to look at things. Especially when he’ll need to prove he can be a competent blocker at the point-of-attack if he’s going to be the starter at the position.

Everything we’ve heard through spring ball and the early days of fall camp have the staff believing Smythe can handle that role. But with so many new variables in the Irish offensive attack, it’ll be up to Smythe to prove he can stay on the field, and then anything else that comes of it should be gravy.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Some believe that Smythe is capable of being the type of frontline tight end the Irish seem to turn out year after year. I’m more a see-it-to-believe-it type, but there’s certainly a very productive football player here if Smythe can make it through a season.

The loss of Jones might impact Nic Weishar more than it does Smythe, who was always the odds-on favorite to be the No. 1 guy as a traditional tight end even before Jones shifted outside to wide receiver in the spring. But even if this position will be an ensemble, Smythe will lead the team in snaps played.

More do-everything tight end than dynamic matchup challenge like a Tyler Eifert or Troy Niklas, it’s no slam on Smythe to not be held to the same freakish standard of that duo. He’s got a chance to be a very good player on a very capable offense.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I’m sticking with similar projections to 2015 for Smythe, who may be asked to help out more in the running game, but is a rare veteran pass catcher on an offense counting on experience to keep things productive. That’ll likely mean more targets for Smythe as there are plenty of opportunities to go around. Even if he shares the load, it’ll lead to his breakout season, even if it’s a year later than expected.

If Smythe gets to 25 catches and scores a few times, it’ll be a nice year—with a fifth-year all but guaranteed. And if the Irish ground game continues to roll, it’ll be because Smythe did a great job as a versatile tight end, perhaps the most traditional of talents Scott Booker has had at the position since he took over.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg
Jalen Elliott
Nicco Feritta
Tarean Folston
Mark Harrell
Daelin Hayes
Jay Hayes
Tristen Hoge
Corey Holmes
Torii Hunter Jr.
Alizé Jones
Jamir Jones
Jarron Jones
Jonathan Jones
Tony Jones Jr.
Khalid Kareem
DeShone Kizer
Julian Love
Tyler Luatua
Cole Luke
Greer Martini
Jacob Matuska
Mike McGlinchey
Colin McGovern
Deon McIntosh
Javon McKinley
Pete Mokwuqh
John Montelus
D.J. Morgan
Nyles Morgan
Sam Mustipher
Quenton Nelson
Tyler Newsome
Adetokunbo Ogundeji
Julian Okwara
James Onwualu
Spencer Perry
Troy Pride Jr.
Max Redfield
Isaac Rochell
Trevor Ruhland
CJ Sanders
Avery Sebastian
John Shannon

 

Counting Down the Irish: 15-11

4 Comments

As we continue our ascent to the top of Notre Dame’s roster, our next five members of the Top 25 play unique roles—all indicative of the talent on Brian Kelly’s seventh team.

Two young players capable of emerging as stars. Two once-heralded recruits stepping into critical roles. And a likely team captain fully transformed after an early-career position switch.

As has been the case with the list so far, there’s little from an on-field performance perspective to validate what we anticipate. But the talent in this group is undeniable, making these projections less about speculation than finally earning an opportunity.

 

2016 Irish Top 25 Rankings
25. Equanimeous St. Brown (WR, Soph.)
24. Durham Smythe (TE, Sr.
23. Justin Yoon, (K, Soph.)
22. Tyler Newsome (P, Jr.)
21. Daniel Cage (DT, Jr.)
20. Sam Mustipher (C, Jr.)
19. Jerry Tillery (DT, Soph.)
18. Max Redfield (S, Sr.)
17. CJ Sanders (WR, Soph.)
16. Drue Tranquill (S, Jr.)

 

SOUTH BEND, IN - SEPTEMBER 26: Blake Frohnapfel #7 of the Massachusetts Minutemen is sacked by James Onwualu #17 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish at Notre Dame Stadium on September 26, 2015 in South Bend, Indiana. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

15. James Onwualu (OLB, Senior): After spending last season playing the majority of snaps in a platoon with Greer Martini, our panel believes that Onwualu’s final season in South Bend will be his best. The former wide receiver has fully transformed his body into that of a linebacker, but still retains the athleticism that should allow him to be excellent in space and in coverage.

Onwualu was Notre Dame’s fourth-best defensive player according to PFF College, grading out at +7.4. With Martini capable of spending time at Will linebacker, Onwualu’s production could go up along with his snap total.

Highest Rank: 12th. Lowest Rank: Unranked (two ballots).

 

South Bend Tribune

14. Alex Bars (RT, Junior): There’s a lot of belief in Bars, who’ll fill left tackle Mike McGlinchey’s shoes on the right side. It’s a move that took more of spring to finalize than some expected, mostly because Bars was still recovering from a broken ankle he suffered against USC.

Brian Kelly has raved about Bars in the past. He certainly looks the part of a high-level offensive tackle, a former elite recruit entering his third season in the program. But this is clearly a projection. He’s played roughly 150 snaps in his college career—all at right guard.

Notre Dame’s depth chart requires Bars to play on the edge. Our panel thinks he’s ready. We’ll see soon enough.

Highest Rank: 9th. Lowest Rank: Unranked (one ballot).

Alize Jones Temple

 

 

     

13. Alizé Jones (TE, Sophomore): Jones led all Irish pass catchers not named Will Fuller in yards per catch, a very nice datapoint for those expecting the former blue-chip recruit to take a giant leap forward in 2016. Add to that his cross-training at receiver as a replacement on the boundary side of the formation, and Jones is poised for a huge breakout.

Jones isn’t the physical mismatch that Tyler Eifert was. But he very well could be used like Eifert was in 2012, strategically moved around and mostly detached to get a mismatch down the field. If that’s the case, expect Jones’ numbers to more than multiply, with some red zone targets also a certainty with Corey Robinson gone as well.

Highest Rank: 4th. Lowest Rank: Unranked (one ballot).

 

Shaun Crawford Josh Adams

12. Shaun Crawford (DB, Sophomore): After an ACL injury ended his freshman season in training camp, Crawford returned this spring dead set on making up for lost time. He looked like the same player who was penciled into the starting nickel job, and might be too good to take off the field, possibly lining up opposite Cole Luke.

Even with a non-contact jersey on in the Blue-Gold game, Crawford was making plays everywhere. He’s undersized, but plays with a physicality that makes you ignore his height. With speed and athleticism to cover slot receivers and the confidence to play on the outside, that our panel pegs him as one of the back-seven’s best playmakers certainly says something.

Highest Rank: 7th. Lowest Rank: Unranked (one ballot).

 

TEMPE, AZ - NOVEMBER 08: Quarterback Taylor Kelly #10 of the Arizona State Sun Devils throws a pass under pressure from linebacker Nyles Morgan #5 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish during the fourth quarter of the college football game at Sun Devil Stadium on November 8, 2014 in Tempe, Arizona. The Sun Devils defeated the Fighting Irish 55-31. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

11. Nyles Morgan (MLB, Junior): For a linebacker who couldn’t get on the field last year, this panel was certainly bullish when evaluating Nyles Morgan. The Chicagoland product steps into Joe Schmidt’s middle linebacker job ranked no lower than 17th on any ballot, with the expectation being Morgan won’t miss a beat in 2016.

From a productivity standpoint, it feels like a lock that Morgan will be one of the team’s leaders. But after watching Morgan understandably struggle with the mental demands of the position as a true freshman, we’ll find out if last season’s watch-and-learn approach pays dividends.

Highest Rank: 8th. Lowest Rank: 17th.

 

***

Our 2016 Irish Top 25 panel:
Keith Arnold, Inside the Irish
Bryan Driskell, Blue & Gold
Matt Freeman, Irish Sports Daily
Nick Ironside, Irish 247
Tyler James, South Bend Tribune
Eric Murtaugh, 18 Stripes
Pete Sampson, Irish Illustrated
Jude Seymour, Her Loyal Sons
JJ Stankevitz, CSN Chicago
John VannieNDNation
Joshua Vowles, One Foot Down
John Walters, Newsweek 

Counting Down the Irish: Ranking Notre Dame’s 2016 roster

Getty
4 Comments

With training camp set to start later this week, it’s time for us to unveil our annual preseason roster rankings. And unlike last season, there’s no shortage of opinions when it comes to Brian Kelly’s seventh roster.

With a young, talented, and inexperienced roster, our panelists had a variety of opinions on how this roster breaks down. That’s to be expected, when the Irish need to replace a starting trio of wide receivers, their best NFL Draft class in over a decade, five captains, the top five players from our list last year and seven of the top ten.

Thirty-seven different players received a vote in your rankings, up from the 33 who found their way onto last year’s list. And while we’ve spent a lot of time talking about the instant impact many freshman could have on this team, it’s interesting to note that no true freshman made our list.

While just about every Irish fan could agree on last year’s 1-2-3 of Jaylon Smith, Ronnie Stanley and Will Fuller, only one of our 12 panelist came up with the exact top three our rankings system produced. And Notre Dame’s starting quarterback? There seemed to be a consensus (both guys rated quite well), but it wasn’t unanimous.

For those looking to turn back the clock, here’s a look at each season under Brian Kelly and the Top Five players from each group (click the season for the entire list):

2015
5. Sheldon Day, DL
4. KeiVarae Russell, CB
3. Will Fuller, WR
2. Ronnie Stanley, LT
1. Jaylon Smith, LB

2014 
5. Tarean Folston, RB
4. Everett Golson, QB
3. Sheldon Day, DT
2. KeiVarae Russell, CB
1. Jaylon Smith, LB

2013
5. Prince Shembo, LB
4. Bennett Jackson, CB
3. Zack Martin, LT
2. Stephon Tuitt, DE
1. Louis Nix, DT

2012
5. Stephon Tuitt, DE
4. Zack Martin, LT
3. Cierre Wood, RB
2. Tyler Eifert, TE
1. Manti Te’o, LB

2011
5. Gary Gray, CB
4. Zack Martin, LT
3. Harrison Smith, S
2. Manti Te’o, LB
1. Michael Floyd, WR

2010*
5. Trevor Robinson, OT
4. Chris Stewart, OG
3. Manti Te’o, LB
2. Kyle Rudolph, TE
1. Michael Floyd, WR

As usual, this list couldn’t be possible without the help of many people. We surveyed a cross-section of Notre Dame experts, hitting up many of the outlets you turn to on a daily basis to cover your favorite football team.

Hope you enjoy.

Our 2016 Irish Top 25 panel:
Keith ArnoldInside the Irish
Bryan DriskellBlue & Gold
Matt FreemanIrish Sports Daily
Nick IronsideIrish 247
Tyler JamesSouth Bend Tribune
Eric Murtaugh18 Stripes
Pete SampsonIrish Illustrated
Jude SeymourHer Loyal Sons
JJ StankevitzCSN Chicago
John VannieNDNation
Joshua Vowles, One Foot Down
John WaltersNewsweek