Tyler Luatua

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Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 53 Sam Mustipher, center

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-2 ½, 305 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Senior with two seasons of eligibility remaining including 2017
Depth chart: Mustipher starts at center. The questions come when figuring out who is behind him after the outgoing transfers of junior Tristen Hoge and sophomore Parker Boudreaux.
Recruiting: A consensus four-star recruit, Mustipher chose Notre Dame over the likes of Alabama, Michigan, Stanford and most other top-tier programs in the country. An Under Armour All-American, rivals.com rated him as the No. 3 prospect in Maryland, the No. 12 guard in the country and the No. 203 overall recruit.

CAREER TO DATE
Mustipher preserved a year of eligibility in 2014 and then backed up Nick Martin in 2015, seeing sporadic action in nine games. With Martin gone in the second round of the NFL Draft, Mustipher started all 12 games at center last season.

QUOTE(S)
Irish coach Brian Kelly knows what he has in Mustipher, a captain and a returning 12-game starter. Nonetheless, Mustipher impressed Kelly this spring.

“We know who the guys are on the left side,” Kelly said at the start of spring practice. “Sam has had a really good eight weeks, as well.”

Kelly also cited Mustipher — along with fifth-year senior left tackle Mike McGlinchey and senior left guard Quenton Nelson — as a leader on and off the field.

WHAT KEITH ARNOLD PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
I don’t think Mustipher will be as solid as Martin was last season (a deep-dig into game tape had Martin surging up draft boards before the Texans took him), but expect a strong season. Perhaps the best version of Mustipher is the one you don’t notice. First-year centers who spend a lot of time in the shotgun need to make sure that every play gets started correctly, and from there he can make sure the Irish win the battle at the point of attack. (It sounds remedial, but let’s not take the snap for granted.)

“Mustipher’s strength let him win more than his fair share of battles last spring with Daniel Cage, a physical force on the interior. If Mustipher can anchor, play with solid technique and get to the second level, Notre Dame’s running game should continue to surge.

“When Tristen Hoge signed with Notre Dame, most thought the high school center had the inside track to multiple seasons starting. That still could happen, but Mustipher might end up the one with three seasons at center, while Hoge battles to be one of the two linemen playing next to him.”

2017 OUTLOOK
Mustipher will start against Temple on Sept. 2. (That’s 75 days away, for those counting.) The Irish desperately hope he will be starting against Stanford to close the season. With both Hoge and Boudreaux gone, Notre Dame does not have a clear-cut backup at center. Whether junior Trevor Ruhland trains at the position or senior Alex Bars readies to move over from right guard should Mustipher get hurt, avoiding those contingencies is an obvious preference.

DOWN THE ROAD
Mustipher will continue to be the fulcrum on the Irish line next season, as well. McGlinchey and most likely Nelson will be off to the NFL, leaving Mustipher and presumably Bars as established starters, plus whoever gets the final nod at right tackle between sophomores Tommy Kraemer and Liam Eichenberg.

With three seasons of starting experience in college, Mustipher will have NFL prospects, though projecting those odds for a center this far ahead of time is a fool’s errand.

More pertinent will be who fills in behind Mustipher at center in 2018. That backup in 2017 will be more of a bandage than a long-term solution, though Ruhland, or perhaps freshman Dillan Gibbons, could certainly turn into that forward-looking answer. Neither will be in 2017, though. Notre Dame could also find a center in the developing recruiting class and give him a year behind Mustipher to learn the craft.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92 (theoretically): Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 90 (theoretically): Cole Kmet, tight end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87 (theoretically): Jafar Armstrong, receiver
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84 (theoretically): Michael Young, receiver
No. 83: Chase Claypool, receiver
No. 82: Nic Weishar, tight end
No. 81: Miles Boykin, receiver
No. 80: Durham Smythe, tight end
No. 78: Tommy Kraemer, right tackle
No. 77: Brandon Tiassum, defensive tackle
No. 75: Daniel Cage, defensive tackle
No. 74: Liam Eichenberg, right tackle
No. 73: (theoretically) Josh Lugg, offensive tackle
No. 72: Robert Hainsey, offensive tackle
No. 71: Alex Bars, offensive lineman
No. 70: Hunter Bivin, offensive lineman
No. 69: Aaron Banks, offensive lineman
No. 68: Mike McGlinchey, left tackle
No. 67: Jimmy Byrne, offensive lineman
No. 65: (theoretically) Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman
No. 58: Elijah Taylor, defensive tackle
No. 57: Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 56: Quenton Nelson, left guard
No. 55: Jonathan Bonner, defensive lineman
No. 54: John Shannon, long snapper

TRANSFERS
No. 66: Tristen Hoge, offensive lineman, transfers to BYU
No. 50: Parker Boudreaux, offensive lineman
No. 30: Josh Barajas, linebacker, to transfer to Illinois State

INJURIES
No. 13: Tyler Luatua, tight end, career ended by medical hardship

Notre Dame TE Tyler Luatua’s career ended by medical hardship

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Senior tight end Tyler Luatua’s football career has come to an abrupt end. Irish coach Brian Kelly announced a medical hardship will prevent Luatua from continuing to play, though he will remain enrolled at Notre Dame on scholarship as he pursues a degree.

“It’s always a difficult decision for a player to step away from football,” Kelly said. “Most importantly, Tyler will still have an opportunity to earn his degree from the University.”

In the case of a medical waiver, the scholarship no longer counts against the NCAA limit of 85, putting Notre Dame now at 83 scholarship players by rough math.

Luatua appeared in all 12 games last season, though largely on special teams. Before last spring’s practices, he briefly publicly entertained a transfer to BYU, before changing his mind in time for Kelly and the Irish to accept him back onto the roster.

This spring early-enrolled freshman Brock Wright appeared to pass Luatua on the depth chart, partly due to the latter’s limitations in the passing game. With Wright ahead of him, Luatua was, at best, the fifth tight end in offensive coordinator Chip Long’s scheme.

Nonetheless, it is never a happy ending when medical reasons truncate a passion.


No. 13
Listed Measurements: 6-foot-3 ½, 260 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Senior with only 2017 eligibility remaining
Depth Chart: As mentioned above, Luatua had slid down the depth chart largely due to the talent influx provided by the incoming freshman class and the return of junior Alizé Mack. Fifth-year senior Durham Smythe and Mack headline the tight ends, and senior Nic Weishar’s better receiving acumen than Luatua elevated Weishar to the No. 3 spot, a coveted position in Long’s offense which often depends on two tight ends. With Wright also moving past Luatua, and incoming freshman Cole Kmet looming, Luatua did not project for much action this season.
Recruiting: A rivals.com three-star prospect, and the No. 12 tight end in the class of 2014, Luatua enjoyed offers from many of the nation’s premier programs, including Alabama, Michigan and Ohio State. Aside from Notre Dame, Luatua most considered Alabama. (more…)

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 90 (theoretically) Cole Kmet, tight end

Rivals.com
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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-4, 235 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Freshman yet to enroll
Depth chart: Tight end might be the deepest position on the Notre Dame roster, and, as a result, Kmet might be further down the Irish depth chart than any other player. Fifth-year Durham Smythe leads the group, with junior Alizé Mack right behind him, if behind at all. Then come seniors Nic Weishar and Tyler Luatua, both of whom may be soon passed by early enrollee freshman Brock Wright. Then, finally, slots in Kmet, if for no other reason than the obvious fact that he has yet to hit the college weight room or learn offensive coordinator Chip Long’s playbook.
Recruiting: Not only was Kmet a consensus four-star prospect, he was a consensus top-five tight end in the country. Rivals.com, for example, rated Kmet as the No. 3 tight end in the class of 2017.

QUOTE(S)
It was difficult for Irish coach Brian Kelly to discuss Kmet without including his classmate Wright during Kelly’s National Signing Day comments. Bringing in two tight ends of their potential in one class certainly stood out as an unlikely occurrence.

“Brock Wright [is] arguably one of the best, if not the best, tight ends in the country,” Kelly said. “But you’re not going to pass up an opportunity at a young man like Cole Kmet who thoroughly impressed us when we got a chance to see him in Irish Invasion.

“We think there can’t be a better tandem at the tight end position in a signing day today. We think we’ve got two tight ends coming in to obviously a very good situation already with Durham Smythe, Alizé [Mack], Nic Weishar, Tyler Luatua. We have great depth at that tight end position, and these two guys only add to it.

“I think you start and you look at the depth at that position, it really jumps out at you.”

WHAT WE SAID WHEN KMET’S NATIONAL LETTER OF INTENT ARRIVED
Kmet completes a duo of tight ends in this class along with early enrollee Brock Wright. Fittingly, Kmet will only burnish Notre Dame’s ‘Tight End U’ reputation. He has the length and athleticism to be a threat in the aerial attack while also contributing in blocking along the edge.”

2017 OUTLOOK
A situation in which Kmet plays in 2017 is nearly beyond fathoming. An injury crisis would have to tear through the Irish tight ends in order to make playing the sixth and most-inexperienced option a necessity.

Kmet’s odds of seeing action this season were further diminished when Wright not only enrolled early but also held his own in spring practice. It is not that Wright is far-and-away better than Kmet, it is that the head start will be most noticeable in their freshman campaign. If Notre Dame opts to play a freshman tight end, it will be Wright, not Kmet.

DOWN THE ROAD
Kmet’s future shines bright. Smythe and Luatua will be gone following 2017, and it is hard to imagine Weishar earning an invitation back for a fifth year. Mack will assuredly be the top target at the position in 2018, but Long has a track record of featuring tight ends. More than one will be needed.

That could mean only Mack and Wright are consistent contributors in 2018, but a third viable option could provide the ability to keep two fresh tight ends on the field whenever wanted.

Beyond that, Mack will have 2019 eligibility, but it seems unlikely he takes it. If he plays up to his palpable potential, it is more likely Mack heads to the NFL Draft as soon as possible—and that does not rule out after this season—than it is he stays around college for five years.

Kmet will get his chance. He comes in too highly-rated not to. It will just be a matter of time and patience.


Aside from the five early enrollees, the numbers are not yet known for the Irish freshmen class. That is one of the admitted drawbacks to organizing this summer-long series numerically. But a little bit of educated guessing can garner estimates for those numbers, and those estimates can allow the series to proceed without pause.

How are those estimates crafted? The first step is to take a look at certain NCAA rules. When it comes to an “end,” the NCAA limits them to Nos. 80-99. Looking at the Irish roster, this leaves only so many likely options for Kmet, hence slotting him at No. 90.

Cole Kmet very well may not wear No. 90, but it is possible, and, frankly, it should be close.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92 (theoretically): Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end

Where Notre Dame was & is: Tight Ends

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With five tight ends—and a sixth coming in the summer—depth was not a concern at the position entering the spring. That peace of mind is never a poor starting point. Two months of spring practice later, and the possible uses of that depth may be more intriguing than ever.

WHERE NOTRE DAME WAS:
Only fifth-year tight end Durham Smythe can claim an abundance of playing time, despite the position’s depth. A year ago Smythe pulled in nine passes for 112 yards and four touchdowns. The production may not have been overwhelming, but Smythe was a clear red zone threat and once he opted to return for one final season with the Irish, he was the presumptive starter.

Rising junior Alizé Jones (now Alizé Mack, but this is the section discussing views of two months ago, so here and only here, he remains Jones) posed as a theoretical threat to Smythe’s starting position, but only in the abstract. Jones missed 2016 due to academic issues. He had not been seen since he caught 13 passes for 190 yards in his freshman campaign.

RELATED READING: Six days until spring practice: A look at TEs

Whether Smythe or Jones led the way for the Notre Dame tight ends, offensive coordinator Chip Long’s arrival seemed to assure more than one would be involved.

“[Long] utilizes two tight ends, which was going to be a mode that we have to move toward with the great depth that we have at that position,” Irish coach Brian Kelly said when introducing his offseason hires.

Indeed Long does prefer two tight end sets and frequently involves them in the passing game. At Memphis last season, Long’s tight ends totaled 36 catches for 423 yards and five touchdowns. Notre Dame’s roster of tight ends has combined career totals of 32 catches for 403 yards and six touchdowns.

WHERE NOTRE DAME IS:
Mack—sorry for that confusion, but dedication to the gimmick necessitated the usage of Jones through that first portion—received praise and only praise throughout the spring. A sampling:

  • “He’s a perfect fit,” Long said the day before the spring finale. “That’s why I recruited him like crazy when I was at Arizona State. He’s a prototypical [tight end], a guy who can run, who can catch.”
  • “He can do all the things that any tight end in the country can do,” Kelly said. “What has changed Alizé is he’s organized in his thoughts and his day-to-day life. … He knows what he’s doing. He’s really got his nose in the playbook and I just think he’s going to be a really successful player.”

(more…)

6 Days Until Spring Practice: A Look at TEs & WRs

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This space briefly discussed Notre Dame’s receivers only a week ago, thus this piece on those catching passes will spend more proportional time on the tight ends. In fact, let’s lead with them.

Why? Because there are more of them on the Irish roster than some seem to realize. The reader who suggested this week’s operating order of positional group analysis is a knowledgeable fan, but the bounty had evaded him, for one.

“I wondered why tight end didn’t get its own spot in that list,” he said after reading the end of Wednesday’s look at offensive linemen. “I just assumed you would pair them with wide receivers…

“I figured there’s also fewer bodies at tight end than anywhere else, really.”

False.

Notre Dame’s roster currently includes three quarterbacks (with freshman Avery Davis arriving in the fall) and four running backs. There are five tight ends, not to mention the No. 3 tight end in the class of 2017 arriving alongside Davis in August.

According to Irish coach Brian Kelly, new offensive coordinator Chip Long will need those reserves.

“[Long] utilizes two tight ends, which was going to be a mode that we have to move toward with the great depth that we have at that position,” Kelly said when introducing his new assistants. “…I wanted the offense to look a specific way. Chip gives me, clearly, something that I saw that will resemble what I see through his offense. It’s going to be the inclusion of the backs and the tight ends in the passing game.”

Notre Dame’s current set of tight ends are not used to being included much in the passing game. The returning quartet of graduate student Durham Smythe, seniors Nic Weishar and Tyler Luatua, and junior Alizé Mack have combined for a career total of 32 catches for 403 yards and six touchdowns. For comparison’s sake, Long’s two tight ends at Memphis totaled 36 catches for 423 yards and five touchdowns last season alone. (Joey Magnifico provided nine of those catches for 85 yards and two touchdowns. This is worth mentioning only because his last name is Magnifico.)

As the primary source of those Irish stats, Smythe presumably has the edge in the chase for a starting position. Last season the 6-foot-4.5, 245-pounder caught nine passes for 112 yards and four touchdowns, while Weishar added three catches for 47 yards.

Mack—née Jones—sat out 2016 amid eligibility issues after catching 13 passes for 190 yards in 2015. If in coaches’ good graces, he should immediately establish himself as a possible complement to Smythe, if not even supplant his elder. Notre Dame lists Mack at 6-4.5, 240 pounds, so both he and Smythe present notable targets for junior quarterback Brandon Wimbush.

Early enrollee Brock Wright—rivals.com’s No. 1 tight end in the class—joins Luatua in rounding out this plethora of goods for Long to incorporate. Having both the spring and the summer to learn Long’s system and embrace a college weight room may give Wright a chance to contribute in 2017.

His classmate, Cole Kmet, however will most likely find himself on the sidelines all of 2017. That is no dismissal of Kmet’s talent. Rather, it is one of the luxuries of having five tight ends to work with all spring.


Though Michigan transfer receiver Freddy Canteen officially committed to Notre Dame on Wednesday, he will not arrive on campus until June. In the meantime, the only sure thing about the Irish receiving corps is junior Equanimeous St. Brown will lead the way.

Junior C.J. Sanders may present the most-obvious partner to tandem with St. Brown, but in last season’s final seven games, Sanders totaled seven catches for 39 yards, compared to opening 2016 with 17 receptions for 254 yards and two touchdowns in its first five games. That drop-off creates an opening for the likes of junior Chris Finke or sophomore Chase Claypool to crack the starting lineup, perhaps alongside sophomore Kevin Stepherson (25 catches, 462 yards, five touchdowns).

The uncertainty also begets opportunities to junior Miles Boykin and sophomores Javon McKinley and Deon McIntosh.

Come fall, Canteen will join the fray alongside freshmen Michael Young and Jalen Armstrong.


With only six days remaining before spring practice commences, the offensive line was featured Wednesday, and the remaining five position groups will follow in the below order.

Wednesday: Offensive Linemen
Today: Tight Ends & Receivers
Friday: Running Backs
Saturday: Quarterbacks
Sunday: Defensive Backs
Monday: Linebackers
Tuesday: Defensive Linemen
Wednesday, March 8: Spring practice begins