Keith Arnold

Jameis Winston,Everett Golson

Golson talks about transfer (though what he doesn’t say is more interesting)

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As he has from the beginning of this odyssey, Fox Sports’ Bruce Feldman has been out front on the Everett Golson transfer news. Releasing Golson’s original statement and getting the first comments out of the former Notre Dame quarterback, Feldman is back at it, talking with Golson about the thought process that led him to pick Florida State.

The quotes, as you may have guessed are quite interesting. As Golson trains in San Diego, interestingly still working with Irish slot receiver Amir Carlisle, it’s clear that the change to a different program is still one that takes getting used to.

“I’m still wearing Notre Dame stuff. It’s something that’s pretty crazy right now for me to adjust to, but I do think it was best for me,” Golson told Fox Sports. “I just needed a fresh start. It was me sitting down and thinking, ‘OK, where do I feel the most comfortable?’ It was nothing to knock Notre Dame. I just had to put myself in the best position possible.”

Finding that “best position possible” wasn’t easy.

Golson acknowledged that some of the SEC destinations were tougher to consider because of the conference bylaw that required a waiver process. He also talked about the idea of playing for Charlie Strong at Texas, a move that didn’t seem possible with the Irish opening up against the Longhorns to start the season.

“It was pretty awkward, but it was kind of expected. It would’ve been interesting to see Texas,” Golson told Fox Sports. They (Notre Dame) basically limited me to the schools that we wouldn’t play. I wasn’t really surprised by it.”

But those early reports that had Notre Dame over-zealously blocking scholarship opportunities didn’t turn out to be a reality. Golson actually appreciated how Notre Dame’s staff and compliance team helped him work his way through the process.

But Golson’s most interesting comments pertain to his new relationship with Florida State head coach Jimbo Fisher. Here’s Golson’s initial reaction to meeting with the Florida State head coach.

“One of the things I was looking for in a coach was for him to be genuine,” Golson said. “What he’s built there at Florida State really sold itself before I started really looking. Actually sitting down and talking to him, I felt like he was gonna shoot me straight and he was a genuine guy. If you’re not doing so well, he’s gonna tell you, and if you are doing well, he’s gonna tell you that, too. I can really respect a guy like that.

“For me, it all started with him being genuine and for me to be able to (play) free again. I think that’s what I lost sight of last season. At the beginning of the season, I was playing free. I was having fun. Closer to the end of the season, it kinda came to feel like a burden.”

While Golson didn’t say a thing about his previous head coach in this statement, what he did say certainly tells the story. While there’s certainly a danger of reading too far into these comments, it’s hard not to wonder what Golson is saying about his past coach when he’s saying this about his new one.

And while he made it clear that being coached hard wasn’t an issue (Fisher has done that plenty, too) “playing free” was the goal. (Though it certainly feels a lot like how Golson played down the stretch, turning a hot start into a turnover-plagued mess as the Irish’s offensive leader couldn’t get out of his own way.)

Golson talked about the mistakes and 22 turnovers piling up, and how he plans on making sure that’s not the case in 2015.

“It was me just not taking care of the ball. It was me trying to do too much at times,” Golson told Feldman. “Not giving up on plays. Me trying to escape the pocket and not keeping two hands on the ball. Just being real careless. Lots of little detail stuff. And that costs us a little bit. At the end of the day what didn’t happen was me getting back to the fundamentals.”

In the end, while all parties involved have said the right thing—Golson included—it’s hard not to conclude that this split is mostly about Golson wanting a change of scenery. As someone who worked through significant adversity to earn his degree from Notre Dame, Golson certainly earned that opportunity.

So while it’s hard for certain Notre Dame fans to understand how a quarterback could walk away from a loaded depth chart and a strong returning roster to take a leap into the unknown, Golson has already done it.

Now it’s time for all parties to move on.

 

For Golson, challenges won’t disappear now that he’s at FSU

Everett Golson
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Everett Golson left Notre Dame for Florida State. Degree in hand, free agency well earned. But for some who thought Golson left South Bend because he wanted nothing to do with a quarterback competition that Malik Zaire seemed to embrace, the fifth-year quarterback’s arrival in Tallahassee won’t mark the end of a position battle.

Golson left a competition for the starting quarterback job at Notre Dame for the vacancy Jameis Winston left behind at Florida State. And Jimbo Fisher apparently made it clear that he welcomed the Irish transfer to campus, but guaranteed him little more than a shot at the starting job.

“Controversy and competition is two different things. It’s competition,” Fisher told the AP’s Ralph Russo. “And players on the team, when a guy is a competitor and he does well — whether it’s Sean [Maguire], it’s Everett, it’s De’Andre [Johnson], it’s J.J. [Consentino], it’s Deondre Francois — whoever is on our team, they’ll follow the guys who play the best, respond the best and lead them the best.”

There’s few who doubt that Golson will win the starting job in short order. But then again, few looked at Notre Dame’s spring practice and saw a job that didn’t look like Golson’s, either.

So as we step back and look at Golson’s decision to start anew, it’s worth looking closer at the relationship with the quarterback and his head coach, and also the instability at the top of the offense, with Golson asked to establish yet another relationship in the more-than-fluid offensive leadership under head coach Brian Kelly.

While Golson only played in one system at Notre Dame, he had multiple teachers. During his freshman year, Charley Molnar was the quarterback coach and offensive coordinator. After Molnar left to take over the UMass program, Chuck Martin ran the offense and the position during Notre Dame’s 2012 BCS title game run.

After Golson’s academic detour in the 2013 season, he returned to a reshuffled coaching staff after Martin took the head coaching job at Miami (Ohio). Golson was then working under Mike Denbrock‘s leadership with new quarterback coach Matt LaFleur asked to work on technique and position responsibilities with Golson and a young depth chart.

LaFleur’s short stay in South Bend was a misstep for Kelly, the young assistant happier in the professional game and returning to work with Kyle Shanahan. Enter another young offensive assistant in Mike Sanford, who had just weeks to build and develop a relationship with his embattled starting quarterback, and it’s fair to consider these factors when people talk about Golson going to learn and work with completely new coaches.

Of course, Golson’s primary coach has always been Kelly. From Day One, the Irish head coach has kept Golson’s tutelage under his purview. And as Kelly moves forward running the Irish program, the head coach needs to take a step back and access whether that arrangement serves his football team best.

Multiple sources close to Golson cite the head coach-player relationship as a significant factor in Golson’s decision to depart. And while some fans would point out that Kelly stuck by and believed in Golson for far longer than any reasonable coach should have, the decision to seek a clean slate was one that hinged on the working relationship between the two men most responsible for the offense’s efficiency.

With Sanford’s arrival and the addition of off-field resources like former Buffalo head coach Jeff Quinn, there’s no shortage of proven offensive leaders in the Notre Dame coaching room. And while Kelly’s DNA won’t change from that of an offensive coach, given a new opportunity to work with Zaire, perhaps the singular nature of the relationship between head coach and his quarterback will change.

All that being said, Kelly isn’t the first head coach to tightly manage the quarterback position. Successful coaches at every level establish that bond with their quarterback, and if there’s any blame to assign—or any perceived failure in Golson deciding to leave—it’s fair to put some of that on the quarterback’s shoulders.

Golson isn’t a guy completely comfortable in the spotlight. And in a program and playing a position where eyes are always watching, the minor details—things like body language on the sideline and press conference demeanor—end up being fair game. And as the mistakes piled up last season, Golson became less and less able to deal with the adversity, finally benched after a flat-line performance against the Irish’s biggest rival in USC.

Even if his season ground to a halt before playing well in limited minutes against LSU, there’s no reason to think that Golson won’t have a good season at Florida State. For all the worries that the offense is too complex and Golson’s timeline is too truncated, this is an offense that allowed players like JaMarcus Russell to thrive, and turned mediocre NFL players like Christian Ponder and EJ Manuel into first-round picks. Golson’s a smart kid with better-than-most skills. He’ll be just fine.

So while Notre Dame fans can only wonder what the Irish offense would’ve looked like with the 1-2 punch of Golson and Zaire, it’s one thing to embrace an unknown quarterback platoon as a fan. It’s an entirely different thing to do it as a player, especially one that hopes to continue his career at the next level.

Golson’s move to Florida State will certainly cut both ways when NFL talent evaluators access his abilities—both to play and to lead at the next level. So while Golson made one difficult decision when he decided to leave South Bend, he faces another set of challenges at Florida State.

 

Hegarty to play out eligibility at Oregon

BYU v Notre Dame
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Matt Hegarty is transferring to Oregon. While the news wasn’t as well chronicled as the departure of his Notre Dame batterymate Everett Golson‘s was to Florida State, Hegarty’s move to the Ducks puts another starter from the 2014 Irish offense onto a team that played in last year’s College Football Playoff.

Hegarty’s departure was announced before spring practice, with the veteran offensive lineman wanting to play out his eligibility at center, a position he hopes to play at the next level. But with Nick Martin healthy and true sophomores Quenton Nelson and Alex Bars ready to play after a redshirt season, Hegarty was told he’d have to compete for a guard job while serving as Martin’s backup.

Hegarty will wear No. 77 in Eugene, working with fellow graduate transfer Vernon Adams, inserting a new center-quarterback combo on a Oregon team that lost Heisman Trophy winner Marcus Mariota and some veteran depth along the offensive line.

Hegarty had plenty of options but wanted a place where he could play competitively and at a high profile program. He looked interested in Northwestern for a moment but ultimately finds a perfect fit playing in Eugene.

After nearly having his career end after a scary mini-stroke suffered during the 2012 season, Hegarty leaves South Bend with his degree in hand and a pro future still in the cards. The New Mexico native was a highly-touted recruit and started two games in 2013 before starting all 13 in 2014, including the final ten at center.

Irish still trying to find the right answers at safety

Purdue v Notre Dame
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As Notre Dame’s finishes up a May spent on the road visiting recruits, one of the keys to a successful 2016 recruiting campaign is to restock the safety position. While graduate transfer Avery Sebastian comes onto campus providing immediate experience, the position is one of the lone worrisome spots on the fully-stocked Irish roster.

As Brian Kelly moves into his sixth season in South Bend, struggles at safety seem to be an evergreen issue. While some Signing Day losses last February kept the haul to just Mykelti Williams and Nicco Fertitta, Notre Dame is targeting three safeties in the 2016 recruiting cycle. The Irish lost out on three-star prospect Kenney Lyke to Michigan State last week, though it doesn’t sound like the Irish are giving up on his recruitment any time soon.

Regardless of Lyke coming around or not, the Irish need to restock the position. Both Elijah Shumate and Sebastian will be gone after the season, so will Swiss-Army defender Matthias Farley. Max Redfield will complete his eligibility in 2016. And the future of mismatched John Turner and injury-plagued Nicky Baratti are cloudy at best.

The struggles at safety go back to the roster Kelly inherited from Charlie Weis. In 2010, the Irish had a two-deep with only four scholarship safeties: Harrison Smith, Jamoris Slaughter, Dan McCarthy and Zeke Motta.

Before Smith was a first-rounder and All-American caliber player, he was a guy who Irish fans had given up on and relegated to linebacker. And when Slaughter was injured in the season opener against Purdue in 2010, Kelly was left with Motta learning on the fly while McCarthy—a guy who some might say never got completely healthy after a serious high school injury—struggled to find a role on the field.

While Smith and Motta provided stability on the back end, it’s been a challenge filling their shoes. The 2013 defense didn’t get great safety play, though Austin Collinsworth finished the season strong. And after Farley shifted to nickel cornerback, the Irish were short-handed from the start last season when Collinsworth was injured 48 hours before the season opener, putting the back-end of Brian VanGorder’s defense both shorthanded and inexperienced with the loss of their fifth-year captain.

We’ve heard all the right things about Shumate and Redfield, who separated themselves in spring ball, especially with Drue Tranquill recovering from an ACL injury and Baratti not a full participant. But the health of this duo is critical, especially if it’ll allow Sebastian to play a complementary role and Farley to stay closer to the line of scrimmage as a slot cornerback.

We’ll get to know names on the recruiting trail like Southern California’s Chacho Ulloa and Devin Studstill, a former high school teammate of freshman Te’von Coney. But with Todd Lyght in his first big-time college job, he’ll be thrown into the deep end trying to upgrade a position group that’s proved to be a challenge from the moment Kelly arrived.

 

Can spring stars deliver in the fall?

C. J. Prosise
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Just like spring marks the end of winter, it also begins another unofficial season on the gridiron. The emergence of spring stars. These breakout stars sometimes burn out before fall rolls around, but it doesn’t make their emergence any less interesting.

It may be a linebacker freed by a graduating veteran. Or a lineman who had a monster offseason in the weight room. Perhaps it’s a freshman, more than ready to take off that redshirt.

Every spring, a handful of players emerge. Some turn out to be mirages. Some, like Joe Schmidt last spring, give all the clues they’ll be ready to be frontline players when fall comes around, and when they do it’s all the more fulfilling.

While Notre Dame’s quarterback situation ruled the headlines, there was still plenty of room for some spring stars to emerge. So let’s take a look at three standouts and see where they’ll be come fall camp.

 

C.J. PROSISE

Overview: With only two scholarship running backs on the roster, Prosise spent the spring cross-training in the backfield. What may have started as an emergency provision turned into a legitimate running option, with Prosise using his game-breaking speed and impressive size to throw a wild card into the running back rotation.

Money Quote: “He’s a guy you are going to fear,” Brian Kelly said after the spring game.

Legit or Mirage? This is looking very legit, with both Kelly and associate head coach Mike Denbrock calling Prosise one of the team’s best offensive players. And with Everett Golson’s transfer, adding a versatile piece to a running game that’ll likely now be accentuated, Prosise’s stock is definitely on the rise.

With Malik Zaire getting another option in the zone-read game, either off the edge or from the backfield, the idea of getting Prosise ten touches on the ground—in addition to his potential as a deep threat—has to have Mike Sanford sketching plays like John Nash.

Outlook for the Fall: Full-time starter, part-time running back.

While Amir Carlisle took the majority of reps as slot receiver this spring, it’s difficult to understand taking Prosise off the field, unless he’s going to spend the majority of his time at running back.

But with Tarean Folston and Greg Bryant a more than capable two-deep, keeping Prosise in the slot allows Kelly to get his best 11 on the field, something he’s talked about doing. With Will Fuller on the outside and Prosise in the slot, that could leave some very appealing match-ups, especially for Chris Brown and Corey Robinson.

 

 

JERRY TILLERY

Overview: The early-enrollee freshman looked like a great left tackle prospect. But after deciding to start his career on defense, Tillery was the defensive lineman that stood out this spring the most, taking advantage of Jarron Jones’ recovery from surgery and limited reps by Sheldon Day. With length, size and (maybe even better) athleticism that reminds people of Stephon Tuitt, Tillery was the talk of spring on the defensive side of the ball.

Money Quote: “He’s just a unique player. One that I can’t remember I’ve coached,” Brian Kelly said. “I don’t want to put him in the Hall of Fame yet, but he’s a unique talent.”

Legit or Mirage? Most likely legit, though we may need to temper our expectations for a first-year defensive lineman. Tillery isn’t necessarily a pass rushing threat, though the Irish will use all the help they can get on the edge. But reaching a half-dozen TFLs during his first season would be an incredible debut for Tillery, especially playing on a defensive line that features Jarron Jones and Sheldon Day as senior starters.

Outlook for the fall: First defensive tackle off the bench.

While it was Jay Hayes that was activated last November when he took his redshirt off, I tend to think that Tillery is the first guy off the bench for the Irish defensive front, playing a slightly larger role than Day played in 2012 when he was the third-man in the defensive end rotation, joining Tuitt and Kapron Lewis-Moore.

Tillery’s versatility will be critical, especially as Brian VanGorder mixes and matches up front with multiple looks. The Irish don’t seem to have a true pass-rushing defensive end, so putting Tillery across from Isaac Rochell would allow the Irish to line up four 300-pounders, an imposing front four.

Putting a lot on the shoulders of a first-year defensive lineman is a risky move. But not many early-enrollee freshmen set off for South Africa on three-week classes, choosing to see the world instead of return home for a brief break.

Just about everybody inside the program expects Tillery to become a star. How soon remains to be seen.

Terrence Magee, Max Redfield
Terrence Magee, Max RedfieldAP Photo/Mark Humphrey

 

MAX REDFIELD

Overview: Most thought Redfield’s strong spring last year would lead to a big season. It didn’t, with Redfield spending a large portion in the dog house before being freed when the position became a MASH unit.

A five-star talent as an athlete, Redfield’s jumped between two different systems when Brian VanGorder took over for Bob Diaco, neutralizing his natural talent with a brain that required too much processing. But a strong Bowl Game and a nice spring have Redfield on track for a big junior season, at a position with absolutely zero margin for error in 2015.

Money Quote: “So much different than where we were at any time during the season,” Kelly said, talking about the improvements Redfield and fellow safety Elijah Shumate made.

Legit or Mirage? With Nicky Baratti and Drue Tranquill each coming off of major surgery, there’s nobody at the position to push Redfield. That said, even if there was, it’s Redfield’s third season in the program and it’s time for the former blue-chip prospect to turn into the type of player everybody expected him to be.

Kelly credited a lightbulb going on for Redfield in his preparations for the Music City Bowl. After a strong spring and an entire summer to continue to learn his role on the defense, Redfield should be ready to be a standout.

I’m not buying in totally just yet, but Redfield has all the tools needed.

Outlook for the Fall: Full-time safety and a Top-Five Defender.

If Redfield is playing as well as he can, he’ll have a chance to be one of the Irish’s top five defensive players. That doesn’t sound like resounding praise, until you consider some of the personnel. All-American Jaylon Smith. Team MVP Joe Schmidt. Returning star cornerback KeiVarae Russell. Captain Sheldon Day. Throw in a ball-hawking centerfielder and the Irish defense could be a very, very good unit.