Keith Arnold

SOUTH BEND, IN - SEPTEMBER 17:  Torii Hunter Jr. #16 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish catches a pass in front of Tyson Smith #15 of the Michigan State Spartans during a game at Notre Dame Stadium on September 17, 2016 in South Bend, Indiana.  Michigan State defeated Notre Dame 36-28. (Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)

Kelly confident that his team will work through the struggles


Notre Dame’s season isn’t over. A young Irish team certainly hasn’t cleaned out their lockers, or given up on playing meaningful games past last Saturday night’s disappointment.

That may not be a popular stance for Irish fans grumbling about Brian Kelly‘s first 1-2 start since 2011, and the third of his time in South Bend. But the Irish head coach has preached the long view to his young team, with just the first quarter of the season complete and plenty more ahead.

“Three games into the season, nobody wants to be where we are, but we are 1-2. I’m a 1-2 coach. We’ve got to work to get better,” Kelly said. “There’s four quarters in the season, and the first quarter, we did not get off to a good start. But there is plenty of time for us to come out of this in a very, very positive way. That’s what we talked about over the last day or so.”

So the Irish move forward with plenty to work on before Duke comes to town this weekend. And Kelly will continue to work as his staff pushes the fundamentals to a young and inexperienced group of defenders, putting faith in the personnel on the field as they take the lumps that come with playing rookies at key positions like safety, corner, nickel and Will linebacker.

“If you believe that all the things that you can do as a coach and all the things that you’re doing from preparation are being covered, then there’s not much more you can do other than believing in your players, working to get better each and every week, and sticking by them so that they improve and get better as the year progresses,” Kelly said.

“I believe the group’s going to get better each and every week. Some of the mistakes that were made out there are fundamental errors that are correctible errors. That’s why I believe we’re going to continue to get better in that area.”


Kelly talked about Cole Luke and the tough Saturday he had. And as you might have guessed, he’s not ready to give up on his senior cornerback—even if he had a tough night against Michigan State.

“Cole is a good player. He’s the smartest defensive player we have,” Kelly said. “He’s got to play with a sense of urgency. He’s got to catch that football. He’s got to make that tackle. He’s got to stay above the cut and be in good position to break on number one. He’s got to do all those things, and he’s capable of doing them, and he knows that.

“He’s just got to go make some plays. We’ve got to rely on him because he’s a three-year starter for us out there, and he’s got to be able to play better for us, and I’m confident he will.”


Notre Dame’s tackling has been suspect. Kelly and his defensive staff understand that. But don’t expect the Irish head coach to meddle with Brian VanGorder’s unit or take over the teaching. The Irish staff is confident in the plan and teaching they have in place, and Kelly talked about what they’ve done to try and correct the problem, with the Irish head coach breaking down the specifics of the fundamental issue.

“Our problem is we don’t go from speed to power,” Kelly explained. “We go from speed to speed. And we miss tackles, and that’s not how we teach it. So we’ve got to communicate it better. We’ve got to break it down.”

Breaking it down means looking at every missed tackle, something Kelly did this week. And his diagnosis after watching the tape?

“I tracked all of our missed tackles, every single one of them is just poor fundamentally,” Kelly said. “Out of control, not being in control of their body. And if we’re just in a better position, a better football position, if we just put ourselves in front of the ball carrier and get run over and hold on for dear life, they’re only going to get another yard or two.”


Notre Dame’s special teams mishaps were also a big part of the problem on Saturday. So while C.J. Sanders has turned into the Irish’s best return weapon since Kelly has been in South Bend, he’s also got a ton of young kids playing in the third phase. That’s made for some uneven performances, but it’s a group that Kelly thinks will do some very good things before the season is over.

Kelly applauded the blocking on the kickoff return that Sanders ran back for a touchdown, calling the hold that Jalen Elliott was flagged for simply “a kid (who) tried to do a little bit too much away from the main play.” The short kick that hit Miles Boykin was a tough situation, and one that Kelly said will be remedied by Sanders running to the football and screaming, with every player doing a better job of knowing where the football is.

“It’s a bit of a mixed bag,” Kelly acknowledged. “I’m not standing here to condemn my special teams unit. They did some really good things. I think it’s a trending group. They’re doing some really good things. We’ve got to clean up some of those mistakes.”


With struggles on the field frustrating fans and coaches alike, an interesting question was posed to Kelly when he was asked about how he deals with struggling players. After seeing Nick Coleman targeted after losing a few key battles against Texas and Luke getting thrown at against the Spartans, some wonder when Kelly and his staff will draw the line and make a change.

Fans—as they often do—call for the backup. Kelly and his staff—as long as the player is giving his best effort and is the best player for the job—sticks with his best man, letting him work through the struggles.

“I just let him go. He’ll break out of it. As long as he’s giving us everything that we have and we’ve evaluated him as being the best player we have at that position, just keep playing,” Kelly said.

“It will come. You’ve just got to keep playing.”

Irish land blue-chip DE Donovan Jeter

Blue and Gold

On a weekend that went the wrong way for the Irish on the field, Notre Dame landed a key piece of the future at a position of need. Pennsylvania DE Donovan Jeter committed to the Irish on Monday, making the decision less than 24 hours after taking his official visit.

Jeter picked Notre Dame over offers from Ohio State, Alabama, Tennessee, Penn State Michigan and Pitt. His brother plays basketball for Pitt.

The 6-foot-5, 250-pound defensive end is a four-star prospect with national offers. He plays a position where the Irish clearly need to get better, as we saw last weekend. And Jeter will help, a prospect who compares favorably at this age to Isaac Rochell, a strongside defensive end who has some pass rush skills as well.

Jeter took to Twitter to make the announcement:

Notre Dame’s pipeline into Western Pennsylvania is well established. In the 2017 class alone, Jeter joins linebacker David Adams, defensive lineman Kurt Hinish and offensive lineman Josh Lugg. The 2018 cycle already has quarterback Phil Jurkovec, one of the nation’s top prospects. And give Hinish an assist for landing Jeter, who had all but crossed the Irish off his list.

This from Blue & Gold’s Corey Bodden—who also details recruiting coordinator Mike Elston’s relentless pursuit of Jeter.

“Honestly Notre Dame wasn’t even in my top five [in July],” Jeter said. “I was at Kennywood [Amusement Park] with Kurt Hinish. He was just on my case like ‘you’ve got to come to Notre Dame with me and this and that.’ Me and Kurt are good friends…so on the way home I was thinking ‘well they are Notre Dame’ and I put them back in.

“[Coach Elston] played a big role because he almost talked to me almost every day. Just checking on me and pitching me on Notre Dame. It worked out. Not every college talks to someone almost every day. It just showed I was important to them.”

That’s 18 members in the 2017 recruiting cycle, with Jeter ranked near the top of the heap. The Irish will have another big recruiting weekend for the Stanford game, with a handful of other national prospects set to come to campus.



Recalibrating expectations for Irish

PALO ALTO, CA - SEPTEMBER 17:  Christian McCaffrey #5 of the Stanford Cardinal carries the ball against the USC Trojans during the first half of their NCAA football game at Stanford Stadium on September 17, 2016 in Palo Alto, California.  (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

The College Football Playoff isn’t in the cards. Not with two early-season losses. Not with the type of defense the Irish are playing. And certainly not with a young roster still learning on the job.

But the season is far from over.

So while some will continue to call for Brian VanGorder’s head or search the head coach’s Twitter likes for the next big off-field controversy, Brian Kelly and his young team have a season to play.

Nobody throws in the towel in mid-September. And there are plenty of ways to turn this season into a success—though it’ll require some recalibrated expectations. Consider this an exercise in that.

With three games of data in hand, let’s take a look at the rest of the Irish schedule, projecting how this season could break week by week.



Duke (1-2): No, not just because it’s the next one. But because Duke’s season was derailed in late August when quarterback Thomas Sirk reinjured his achilles tendon, ending the senior’s year before it even started. That’s taken some punch out of Duke’s offense and put too much pressure on the team’s undermanned defense. It should be a good Saturday to get a bad taste from the Irish’s mouth.


Army (3-0): This is no cupcake, as Army has been in year’s past. Just look at the damage Army has done in its opening three games, laying it on Temple in the season opener, beating Rice handily and then waxing UTEP. That doesn’t mean that the Shamrock Series game isn’t a must-win, but after watching this defense, you can’t be sure that the Irish will have their option game on point just because they did last season. With a young defense still learning things on the fly, this game is far scarier than ever imagined.



Syracuse (1-2): Dino Babers’ team isn’t ready for primetime. And they aren’t going to have a true home field advantage. Moving the game into the Meadowlands will take away any of the benefits of the Carrier Dome, though Babers’ hyper-speed offense might have found its footing by then and could make for a long weekend for the Irish.

Any other season and I’d have chalked this game into category one. But after watching the defensive performance against Texas and Michigan State, this one has me worried, especially with a noon start just announced.


Navy (3-0): Ken Niumatalolo is rolling along, even if he’s had to replace starting quarterback Tago Smith. The Midshipmen pulled off a huge upset of Bob Diaco’s UConn team and they keep winning, beating Tulane last weekend to move to 3-0 as well.

They’ll have a week off before playing Air Force, the first of five tough tests before playing the Irish. The game comes just a week after the Irish host Miami, and is a really-early 11:30 kickoff in Jacksonville. The first of back-to-back option games, Navy is almost a game that’ll put immense pressure on both the offense and defense, with the Midshipmen limiting possessions and forcing the Irish defense to take them off the field.


North Carolina State (2-1): I very nearly put this into the 50-50 category, but am keeping it here because of the Wolfpack’s suspect schedule strength. Boise State graduate transfer quarterback Ryan Finley looks like he’ll be a handful for the Irish, already sporting a shiny 6:0 TD:INT ratio. Throw in a big running game and the fact that Dave Doeren is still looking for a big win three years into his run at NC State, and you get the feeling that the Wolfpack faithful will have this one circled on the schedule.




Virginia Tech (2-1): New coach Justin Fuente has started life after Frank Beamer off quite nicely for the Hokies, winning twice in his first three games, including an absolute beat down of Boston College 49-0. It helps that he’s found his quarterback, junior Jerod Evans, a juco transfer who has shaken things up immediately. The Hokies defense seems to be doing good things, with holdover Bud Foster still in Blacksburg. And the mix of attacking defense and opportunistic offense hasn’t felt like a good matchup lately for the Irish.


USC (1-2) This only stays as a coin flip because the Trojans have been the biggest dumpster fire in the country this season. After opening up with an embarrassing stomping at the hands of Alabama, things haven’t gotten much better for Clay Helton. He’s dealt with off-field distractions both serious (sexual assault chargers) and self-inflicted (JuJu Smith-Schuster fighting his teammates), as well as terrible self-discipline on the field. At 1-2 with two lopsided losses already, the hiring of Helton instead of trying to get a fresh start is looking dumber and dumber.


Miami (3-0): Entering the season, this felt like a game the Irish should win, with Mark Richt transitioning the Miami program after finally cutting bait on the Al Golden era.  But with Brad Kaaya throwing the football and the Hurricanes taking care of an admittedly cupcake-ish start, consider me a pessimist that the young Irish defense can find a pass rush and good coverage by then.

Again, things will reveal themselves over the next month. For the Irish, they can right the ship. For the Canes, their true talents will be revealed. But the Irish defense will be in the crosshairs that Saturday, with Kaaya the best quarterback on the Irish schedule.




Stanford (2-0): The Cardinal have been tested early this season and passed swimmingly, grinding out comfortable wins against Kansas State and USC. They feature college football’s best all-around running back and a defense that’s only getting better. They’ll bring a physical attack to South Bend, one that’s much better than the Spartans offense that bludgeoned the Irish in the trenches.

Of course, Notre Dame found a way to slow down Christian McCaffery last season, only to lose when Kevin Hogan lit them up through the air. The Cardinal have three Pac-12 opponents—at UCLA, at No. 9 Washington and Washington State—on the slate before the night kickoff in South Bend, giving us a chance to see just how good new quarterback Ryan Burns is. But the Cardinal defense looks like its back to its stingy ways, and the Irish will need to play a great football game to win this one.

Behind the Irish: A look at Michigan State-Notre Dame


The return of the Notre Dame-Michigan State rivalry brought the Megaphone Trophy back into play for the first time since 2013. And the 36-28 loss has put Notre Dame in a tough place, their year-end goals adjusted with their playoff hopes running away from them like LJ Scott on Saturday night.

But before we turn the page to Duke (more on that later), NBC took an inside look at the rivalry, what it means to both teams, and some of the big moments in the long-running rivalry.

The Megaphone is back in East Lansing for the first time since 2010.  And Mark Dantonio got his first win against Brian Kelly since Little Giants.

The good, the bad, the ugly: Notre Dame vs. Michigan State

Michigan State running back LJ Scott (3) leaps over Notre Dame linebacker Nyles Morgan during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016, in South Bend, Ind. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

The Megaphone returns to East Lansing. And Notre Dame goes back to work.

On a weekend that served as a separation Saturday of sorts, contenders and pretenders emerged. Unfortunately for the Irish, they’re on the outside looking in, a familiar formula costing Notre Dame in a game that played out with all too much familiarity.

A porous defense, an inconsistent offense and bad special teams. Let’s get through the good, bad and ugly from Notre Dame’s disappointing 36-28 loss.



Fourteen minutes (roughly): That’s the amount of time the Irish were playing at full octane. From the moment they took the football over with 3:45 remaining in the third quarter and went all-in to storm back.

You saw DeShone Kizer cut loose. You saw the offense stress the Spartans vertically. Defensively, the Irish managed to get stops. No, they still couldn’t get off the field quickly time—though they forced three-straight punts.

On a Saturday when everybody should be looking for building blocks, this is the best place to start.


Quick Hits: 

* Lost amidst the loss in the trenches was a nice game by Quenton Nelson. The junior was rock-solid in his assignments on the inside, grading out as the best player for the Irish, per PFF College.

* Brian Kelly said postgame that this wasn’t just going to be DeShone Kizer bailing the team out. But he sure tried. Kizer wasn’t perfect and his discomfort in the pocket led to some accuracy issues. But with the game on his shoulders, he roared the team back.

Notre Dame has now scored 15 touchdowns. All but two of them have come from either Kizer’s arm or legs. While some are ready to throw in the towel for the season, Notre Dame’s coaching staff just needs to find some sense of competence from the defense, or risk wasting a historic season by Kizer.

* For the first time in his career, the elite athleticism and tantalizing promise of Jerry Tillery finally showed through. The sophomore flashed those dominant traits, making two TFLs and proving to be disruptive at times in the trenches, a much-needed development if the Irish defense is going to stop that flaming tire from burning down the defense.

* Nice to meet you, Chase Claypool. That’s one athletic dude streaking down the field. Can we find a few more opportunities for the young man?

* Most of his catches came after the Irish had to play catchup, but nice to see Torii Hunter Jr. come back and look healthy, too.

* Durham Smythe helped the Irish tight ends out of witness protection. After nearly entering the doghouse with a critical penalty that took a touchdown off the board.

* It’s hard to say how well Nyles Morgan is playing, especially when the Will linebacker position continues to struggle. But Morgan is a tackling machine, adding 10 more and eight solo stops.



Cole Luke. Upon further review, Luke’s evening was just as bad as it was in real-time. The senior cornerback’s struggles make no sense, though his confidence is likely bruised and he’s certainly pressing. That makes a smart football player do some less-than-intelligent things—Luke’s mental mistakes just as head-scratching as the physical, one-on-one losses.

There’s no need to harp or pile on, though it’s a game Luke will need to quickly forget. Especially with the Irish in need of getting on an upswing before Stanford comes to town in three weeks.


The special teams. The bar has been raised for Scott Booker’s special teams unit. And they didn’t come close to clearing it on Saturday night. A game-changing start by CJ Sanders was erased by Jalen Elliott’s holding. Miles Boykin’s mistake was a Pop Warner error if there ever was one. That’s as much on Boykin as it is on Sanders, Booker and everybody else that should be looking for the football.

Tyler Newsome was pumped up after he drilled a 71-yarder. And while his 50.3 yard average and three punts inside the 20 will look like a successful game, Newsome once again botched his first kick, failing to flip the field when the Irish needed him to do so.

Throw in Nicco Fertitta’s bone-headed unsportsmanlike conduct penalty after making a nice block and it was amateur hour in a phase of the game that Kelly talked about this week as being critical.


Drue Tranquill. Notre Dame expected Drue Tranquill to play a key role in this defense. Instead, he’s been a huge part of the problem.

Tranquill was a liability again Saturday night, a key defender that was counted on to be a sure-tackling strong safety. And as intelligent, hard-working, and well-respected as Tranquill is, he’s killing the Irish defense with his inconsistencies.

It’s easy to take some of the bad that comes with Tranquill in coverage if he’s a sledgehammer against the run. But the junior who has heroically returned from two major knee injuries has been really suspect, when the team needs him to be a rock as they break in Devin Studstill. He led the Irish in missed tackles on Saturday night, the only defender who graded out (per PFF College) worse than Luke.

Tranquill is still a young player, injuries essentially robbing him of a full season—and two key springs—of development. But the junior needs to find his rhythm quickly, or Notre Dame needs to push Avery Sebastian into a much larger role.


The pass rush. That’s three weeks and no sacks. And while the Irish did manage to make things slightly uncomfortable for Tyler O’Connor, the Irish are the only Power Five team not to have tackled the opposing team’s quarterback behind the line of scrimmage.

Spin it any way you want, and that’s a big problem. Especially when you’re trying to help a young secondary.


The defensive personnel. Perhaps some of the comfort that comes with calling for Brian VanGorder’s head is that it ignores the other possibility. Namely, that Notre Dame’s defensive personnel just isn’t that good.

Yes, it’s becoming more and more obvious that VanGorder isn’t a good fit. (Yes, I know that’s an understatement.) But it’s also becoming more and more obvious that the Irish just aren’t that good on defense.

It’s pretty clear that Notre Dame’s staff has swung and missed on the defensive side of the football, all those high-profile recruits struggling to live up to their ranking. It’s also clear that you can have a handful of talented players on the field, but they’re quickly erased if one or two aren’t doing their job.

The Irish can’t rush the passer. That’s less on VanGorder’s exotic schemes or Keith Gilmore’s teaching techniques than it is on Andrew Trumbetti or the rest of the personnel that can’t win their one on one battle, especially a few seasons of recruiting misses at defensive end.



Freshmen are freshmen. They’re seeing and doing things for the first time. And right now, Notre Dame is relying on too many of them, young kids and inexperienced talent trying to hold up their end of the bargain while Morgan, Isaac Rochell and James Onwualu play better-than-average football. That the Irish don’t have any other veterans capable of beating out the kids shows you how difficult it is to transition systems and do so while upgrading talent.

Running a high-priced and unsuccessful coach out of town is always an option—and it looks like that’s the way this will end up. But when you think about Kelly’s fiery comments from postgame, through the subpar personnel lens, this comment feels a little bit different.

“Those are the guys we have. We can’t trade em. They’re not getting cut. We recruited them. I told our staff, ‘Those are our guys, so we’ve got to get ’em better. We’ve got to put them in better position to make plays,’” Kelly said.



Another loss against a quality team. If Notre Dame wants to measure itself against the best, they won’t like what they see. The Irish have lost four of their last five, Nevada the only win. That type of slide during the seventh season of a head coach’s tenure isn’t a datapoint you want to see.

Of course, there’s context for everything. The Irish lost 10 players to the NFL. They’re breaking in an unprecedented amount of new starters—three more than the worst team in Notre Dame history. And that was before preseason and injury attrition hit.

It might be our fault for believing this team could reload and compete for a playoff berth. Because only Ohio State and Alabama have proven they’re up to that task. But adjusting expectations in mid-September is an ugly place to be. And yet that’s where we stand, with Notre Dame finding another way to shoot themselves in the foot when taking on a team that’s capable of matching up with them athletically.

So the focus shifts. And while some Irish fans might check out for the fall, it’d be a surprise if Kelly’s team did. Especially a young roster that’ll now get younger and younger, the goals more incremental now than ever.

“The focus just becomes on what I just talked about: each individual getting better, each individual improving from week and week,” Kelly said on Sunday. “The focus being really much more smaller in a sense. All we’re looking for is to find a way to win and beat Duke. That’s really the goal that’s in front of us.”

It’s been a few years since Irish fans saw their postseason dreams ruined in September. But for the players and coaches who put in a year-round commitment, there’s been too much work put in to abandon things now.

“This is work. We’ve got some work to do. But we got a group that will fight and compete. I’m proud of the way they go out and represent Notre Dame on the field,” Kelly said. “We got to clean up a lot of things. We’ll continue to work with a lot of young players. I’m confident that we’ll be a better football team in November than we are in September.”