Author: Keith Arnold

SOUTH BEND, IN - NOVEMBER 14:  Josh Adams #33 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish rushes for a 98-yard touchdown against the Wake Forest Demon Deacons during the second quarter at Notre Dame Stadium on November 14, 2015 in South Bend, Indiana.  (Photo by Jon Durr/Getty Images)
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Last Look: Running Game

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The season is over. Before we turn our attention to recruiting and some of our offseason plans that’ll surely lead into an interesting spring, let’s take a look at the final stats from the 2015 Fighting Irish as we reach some final conclusions on the season that was.

We’ll start with the running game. Notre Dame’s ground attack was its most potent in the Kelly era, both the cumulative 2,699 rushing yards and the astonishing 5.6 yards per rush the team averaged, eighth-best in the country. Big plays certainly buoyed those totals—Josh Adams, C.J. Prosise and DeShone Kizer each had touchdown runs of 79-yards or longer and Brandon Wimbush added a 58-yard scamper as well.

All of this came from a depth chart not many expected to see. Exiting fall, C.J. Prosise looked like a contingency plan, a wildcard added to a two-deep of Tarean Folston and Greg Bryant. That duo took the field for a total of three carries, Bryant exiting the program over the summer and Folston ending his season on the third carry of the year.

That didn’t stop the rushing attack. Prosise managed to be the first Irish back to break 1,000 yards since Cierre Wood did it in 2011. Adams set a freshman record for rushing yards. And Kizer set a school record for most rushing touchdowns by a quarterback. Not too shabby.

Let’s take a closer look at the stats and hand out some end of the year awards.

Rush Totals

 

 

 

 

 

 

MVP: C.J. Prosise. The late surge by Josh Adams makes this a much tougher decision than I expected—especially with Prosise touching the football only 16 times after Halloween. But that would undervalue the first two-thirds of the season, and Prosise was a star for the Irish essentially through the USC game, going on a three-game run of averaging over nine-yards a carry while also making huge gains in the passing game as well.

Prosise was dynamic in the open field. He was tough to tackle. And his versatility was likely what led to the decision to head to the NFL instead of playing out his eligibility. He still has room for improvement as a running back, especially between the tackles and picking up the tough yardage. But he supplied a season’s worth of big plays in his limited action, a triumphant debut season as a running back.

 

Biggest Disappointment: Tarean Folston’s knee injury. You can only wonder what Notre Dame’s running game would’ve looked like had Folston lasted more than three carries. The Irish’s most natural runner, Folston doesn’t have the big-play speed that Prosise and Adams enjoy, but his vision and elusiveness would’ve been really impactful behind the Irish offensive line.

Prosise’s departure likely impacted Folston more than anybody else. With Adams and Prosise both returning, Folston’s role in the backfield likely would’ve made things cluttered. Now the Irish will enjoy a two-back platoon with sophomore Dexter Williams fighting for carries after showing some skills as a true freshman.

Folston’s rehab is on track, the rising senior is already running as he enters the fifth month of his recovery. He won’t likely do much in spring practice, but he should be ready to cut loose during summer, a critical time for his reemergence in the backfield.

 

Biggest Surprise: DeShone Kizer’s record-breaking season. If you had DeShone Kizer as the quarterback to break the touchdown record for his position, I’ll check your pockets for Biff’s sports almanac from Back to the Future 2. Kizer’s abilities as a runner were the big surprise of the season. They allowed the Irish offense to continue churning after Malik Zaire‘s injury, with Kizer showing a great feel for the read option and better-than-expected speed.

As a big-bodied 23o-pound runner, Kizer turned into Notre Dame’s short-yardage weapon of choice. He allowed the Irish to add an additional blocker to the box, neutralizing some of the defense’s advantages in addition to his size allowing him to fall-forward for tough yards. No, it didn’t pay off on the two-point play against Clemson late in the game. But Kizer’s 10 scores eclipsed a team record held by Tony Rice and Rick Mirer. Not too bad for a kid who was collecting dust as the No. 3 quarterback last spring.

 

Brightest Future: Josh Adams. Notre Dame’s freshman back might have the highest ceiling of any running back recruited by Brian Kelly. A hidden gem courtesy of an ACL tear suffered midway through his junior season, Adams arrived on campus expected to redshirt and instead set a school record for most yards as a freshman.

Adam’s 835 yards were impressive. He broke loose in his debut against Texas for two scores on five carries. His 70-yard run against UMass hinted at the breakaway speed Kelly and his staff saw when Adams camped in South Bend.

But more important than any highlight was the workload Adams took on when Prosise could no longer go. In the season’s final five games, Adams ran the ball 83 times for 570 yards, averaging 6.9 yards a carry and 114 yards a game against five tough defenses. A true freshman picked up the slack when there was nobody else to carry the load, and Adams produced at an elite level.

With an additional year in a college strength program and another year away from his knee surgery, Adams could have a monster 2016.

Showtime’s ‘A Season With Notre Dame Football’ comes to an end

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As they’ve done all season, Showtime’s film crew followed the football team through Fiesta Bowl preparations and their battle with Ohio State. And while the conclusion of “A Season With Notre Dame Football” came to an end with two-straight losses, the look inside the locker room showed a head coach proud of his football team and a group of players who laid it all on the field.

The finale aired on Showtime last night and is available on-demand. But here’s a clip of the locker room right after the difficult loss to the Buckeyes.

Report: Smith has torn ACL, MCL, surgery on Thursday

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ESPN’s Chris Mortensen reports that Jaylon Smith will have surgery to repair his injured left knee on Thursday. Mortensen revealed that Smith has a torn ACL and MCL, the same thing Fox 28 in South Bend reported earlier in the week.

Smith has not made his future plans known, though he is still expected to enter the 2016 NFL Draft.

 

Irish commit Khalid Kareem named MVP of Semper Fidelis bowl

khalid Kareem
Rivals / Yahoo Sports
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Khalid Kareem will be a freshman at Notre Dame next week. But before going to South Bend, he won some hardware in his final football game as a high schooler. The four-star defensive end was named the Semper Fidelis All-American Bowl’s MVP after he recovered two fumbles, returning one for a touchdown and very nearly scoring on a second.

It was a good finale after a dominant week of practice for the one-time Alabama commit who instead will jump into the defensive end depth chart at Notre Dame. Andrew Ivins of BlueandGold.com got this report from Rivals, who was on site in Southern California for a week of practice.

“Just having seen both teams practice, I think he’s probably one of the few guys that looks specifically ready to be a role player or be able to do some things [as a true freshman],” Rivals’ Blair Angulo told B&G. “Obviously I don’t think he’s going to be in there and make an impact right away and be a star, but he’s a guy that I think is ready physically to play.” “He was a nightmare match up off the edge,” Angulo added referencing one-on-one drills. “He has just enough speed, enough size and enough length to be a problem for some of these offensive tackles out here at the Semper Fi Bowl, but he also has a pretty good array of moves.”

Kareem’s physical strength and skill-set is a good place for Keith Gilmore to get started. With Romeo Okwara graduated and Grant Blankenship, Andrew Trumbetti and some other young players fighting to start opposite Isaac Rochell, Kareem has a chance to get into the mix with a strong spring.

Here’s video of Kareem’s two fumble recoveries. Second semester starts January 11th.

Stay or Go? Analyzing Jaylon Smith’s NFL decision

during the BattleFrog Fiesta Bowl at University of Phoenix Stadium on January 1, 2016 in Glendale, Arizona.
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All-American and Butkus Award-winner Jaylon Smith‘s knee injury was a nightmare scenario for anybody who likes football. Notre Dame’s junior linebacker had roughly 50 minutes left of his college career when Ohio State tackle Taylor Decker got a final shove in at the whistle, causing Smith to step and land awkwardly on his left leg and his knee to buckle unnaturally.

The result is a “significant” knee injury, with a local Fox-affiliate reporting multiple ligament damage, likely the ACL and MCL. That type of injury threw a very large wrench into the postseason plans of Smith, who even with a reported $5 million insurance policy has to make some difficult decisions.

On Monday, Sports Illustrated’s Peter King wrote in his Monday Morning Quarterback about Smith’s dilemma, pointing to the lofty draft status Smith had in some team’s eyes before the injury:

I think this is what I heard on Jaylon Smith, the highly talented Notre Dame linebacker and prospective very high NFL draft choice who suffered that terrible left knee injury in the Fiesta Bowl: Smith, a junior, was very likely to come out in the 2016 draft, and he would have been a top three to five pick if he came out healthy.

One NFL scout who was at the Fiesta Bowl said Saturday he thought Smith was a top-three pick. Another who I spoke with Saturday said of the players he saw this fall, if Smith came out, he’d have been a strong candidate to be the top overall pick. “There is not a defense he would not fit in,” the second scout said. “This is a huge story.”

Over the weekend, Eric Hansen of the South Bend Tribune tackled the same question, talking to NFL Draft analyst Scott Wright about an injury that—even if Smith slides from a Top 5 pick to the 15th overall slot—could be as much as a $15 million hit.

“Let’s say it’s a torn ACL,” Wright told Hansen, “something similar to what (Georgia running back) Todd Gurley had last year. Smith is going to go in the first round anyways, because like Todd Gurley, he’s such a freak talent that there’s a limit to how far he’s going to slip.

“At some point in the first round, somebody’s going to say, ‘Hey, we’re going to take a top five talent if he falls into our lap.’ ”

Wright said it’s not inconceivable that Smith could slide from No. 5 to No. 15. And based on the inflexible rookie salary scale and last year’s signing figures, that’s the difference between a $21.2 million, four-year contract at the fifth draft position and one of $10.7 million, 10 picks later.

The signing bonus differential is also significant — $13.7 million vs. $6 million, which is included in the total contract value.

That loss of money—the lump-sum signing bonus and additional guaranteed money from the rookie contract—might give Smith reason to consider returning to Notre Dame. Play out his senior season, earn a degree, and reenter the draft completely healthy, hoping to reestablish himself as an elite pick at the top of the 2017 draft board.

Of course, that’s no sure thing either.

Smith is nine months away from opening day against Texas. That’s not a herculean ask to be back on the field and ready to play with today’s medical advancements, but Smith would still be working his way back and doing his recovering on the field, evaluated by NFL scouts who’ll see a linebacker likely wearing a large knee brace. It’ll serve as a constant reminder that he’s still less than a year removed from a major surgery that could rob Smith of his best football trait—rare athleticism and speed for a linebacker.

Those traits don’t seem to be in question. If Smith declares for the draft in the next few days—he still has two weeks to make that decision official—he’ll spend the next few months rehabilitating, not going through the cattle call that asks NFL prospects to validate their on-field performance with height and weight measurements, appropriate arm length, 40-yard dash times and short and long shuttle runs. A team that drafts Smith early likely believes that he’ll return to the numbers we assumed he’d run, a 40-yard dash in the 4.5 range and equally nimble and explosive times and scores. Smith won’t be asked to prove those numbers—one of the rare luxuries that come with an injury like this.

Todd Gurley’s run up the draft board to No. 10 last year proves that it only takes one team to believe in your ability to be a game-changer. And as King’s comments show, Smith is the type of player that has lots of teams believing in his ability to fit into their scheme and change the football game.

Ever since Willis McGahee suffered a major knee injury in his final college football game and still found his way into the first round, teams have become more and more comfortable with the recovery from a knee injury that’s now almost routine thanks to the evolution in medical treatment. Smith could receive that type of treatment in South Bend, or do it under the watchful eye of his new employers—while getting paid a hefty salary to do so. Most NFL players who make generational money don’t do it on their first contract, they do it on their second. Smith leaving for the league puts him a year closer to that second deal.

That’s a large assumption. We’ve seen recently the negative that comes with leaving Notre Dame before you’re ready, with Troy Niklas and Louis Nix cashing weekly paychecks but doing nothing to assure themselves of career longevity.

We’ve heard nothing from Smith yet, who is likely talking with his family and advisors about not just his professional future, but the decision on who’ll perform the surgery to repair his knee. From there, Smith will likely meet with Brian Kelly and Jack Swarbrick a final time before deciding what he’ll do moving forward.

In all likelihood, Smith’s time at Notre Dame is over and he’ll move on to the NFL. You only wish that the circumstances surrounding the decision were better.