Author: Keith Arnold

Donte Vaughn

Irish add commitment from CB Donte Vaughn


Notre Dame’s recruiting class grew on Monday. And in adding 6-foot-3 Memphis cornerback Donte Vaughn, it grew considerably.

The Irish added another jumbo-sized skill player in Vaughn, beating out a slew of SEC offers for the intriguing cover man. Vaughn picked Notre Dame over offers from Auburn, LSU, Miami, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, Tennessee and Texas A&M among others.

He made the announcement on Monday, his 18th birthday:

It remains to be seen if Vaughn can run like a true cornerback. But his length certainly gives him a skill-set that doesn’t currently exist on the Notre Dame roster.

Interestingly enough, Vaughn’s commitment comes a cycle after Brian VanGorder made news by going after out-of-profile coverman Shaun Crawford, immediately offering the 5-foot-9 cornerback after taking over for Bob Diaco, who passed because of Crawford’s size. An ACL injury cut short Crawford’s freshman season before it got started, but not before Crawford already proved he’ll be a valuable piece of the Irish secondary for years to come.

Vaughn is another freaky athlete in a class that already features British Columbia’s Chase Claypool. With a safety depth chart that’s likely turning over quite a bit in the next two seasons, Vaughn can clearly shift over if that’s needed, though Notre Dame adding length like Vaughn clearly points to some of the shifting trends after Richard Sherman went from an average wide receiver to one of the best cornerbacks in football, and Vaughn will be asked to play on the outside.

Vaughn is the 15th member of Notre Dame’s 2016 signing class. He is the fifth defensive back, joining safeties D.J. Morgan, Jalen Elliott and Spencer Perry along with cornerback Julian Love. The Irish project to take one more.

With Notre Dame expecting another huge recruiting weekend with USC coming to town, it’ll be very interesting to see how the Irish staff close out this recruiting class.




Days before facing Notre Dame, USC coach Steve Sarkisian to take leave of absence


When Notre Dame takes on rival USC on Saturday, they’ll be facing a Trojans team without a head coach. USC athletic director Pat Haden announced today that effective immediately, head coach Steve Sarkisian will be taking an indefinite leave of absence. Offensive coordinator Clay Helton will be interim head coach.

While the details are still coming into focus, multiple reports point to another incident with alcohol. Haden himself said that he made the decision after speaking with Sarkisian.

“I called Steve and talked to him. It was very clear to me that he is not healthy. I asked him to take an indefinite leave of absence,” Haden said, according to multiple Los Angeles media reports.

Sarkisian’s decision-making and alcohol use came into the spotlight this August when the head coach made inappropriate statements at a large booster event. Sarkisian addressed the media after the incident, acknowledged mixing medication with alcohol, and vowed to seek help and not to make the same mistake again.

Today’s incident appears to be a relapse, and one that requires immediate attention. Helton ran the team’s practice today and steps back into an interim head coaching role, a job he handled after the Trojans fired Lane Kiffin and Ed Orgeron left after not being awarded the permanent job.

“Fortunately or unfortunately, I have been in this situation before,” Helton said. “Once again, I’m very fortunate to have a group of first-class kids that are extremely talented and want to do something special here.”

This is the second major sports persona to leave his season to seek treatment in recent weeks. New York Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia left the team to seek treatment for alcohol issues. The Trojans are coming off an upset loss to Washington on Thursday night, losing 17-12 as a 17-point favorite.


The good, the bad, the ugly: Notre Dame vs. Navy


Notre Dame beat Navy by 17 points, the final quarter a comfortable finish in a series that doesn’t always afford one. And with victories over both the Midshipmen and Georgia Tech, the coaching staff’s work over the offseason achieved its desired result.

Yes, the game was sloppy. Notre Dame was gashed by the fullback dive, a struggle that felt a little bit like a regression, especially with everybody seemingly understanding that Job No. 1 is, and always will be, stopping the fullback.

So while Quentin Ezell awoke the ghosts of Vince Murray and Alexander Teich, the defense tightened up in the second half. And winning the turnover battle decisively helped make up for a less explosive Irish offense, with the Midshipmen able to keep Notre Dame from breaking a play of longer than 30 yards.

It’s time for USC. So let’s put the triple-option to bed with the Good, Bad and Ugly and then get ready for the Trojans.


Forcing Turnovers. Navy turned the ball over three times after having just one turnover through the first four games of the season. That played a huge factor in the victory, allowing the Irish a considerable margin for error on offense as they struggled early to score points.

Elijah Shumate made an excellent interception to seal the deal. Jaylon Smith was opportunistic when an option pitch fell through the hands of Chris Swain. And a key strip by Nyles Morgan led to Devin Butler recovering the opening kickoff of the second half and turning the game on its head. (Butler had to fight through a scrum to secure the ball, after missing an easy opportunity when the ball originally popped out.)

The Irish won the turnover battle for the first time since 2012. Not surprisingly, that allowed the Irish to get Navy off-schedule, and the result was some breathing room during the fourth quarter, with the Irish controlling the football and the game clock with three consecutive drives of 10 plays or more to end the game.


Getting Out Injury Free. On Sunday’s teleconference call, Brian Kelly confirmed what we thought we saw on Saturday—the Irish survived against Navy’s offense with no major injuries. Kelly credited that to good luck, but also talked about the continual work against the SWAG team, who cut block against the starting defense the week of the Georgia Tech game as well as this week.

“We had no injuries again—knock on wood—this week to anything below the waist for any of our linemen,” Kelly said. “They’re a little sore, obviously, but no major injuries there, again, for playing two very physical teams that play the triple option.”

Jerry Tillery did sprain his elbow, though Kelly said the freshman will wear a brace and continue to play. Nick Martin tweaked his ankle, though returned to play. And Kelly talked about how nice it’s been these past few Sundays after a nightmarish start to the season.

“My 1:30 (Sunday) meeting with the doctors has been my most anxious time of the year,” Kelly quipped. “So the last couple of weeks, the last two, three weeks have been pretty good. Hopefully, that trend continues because we get USC this week, and then we get a week off. So that’s going to be helpful as we move into the back end of the season.”


Robby Regan. Notre Dame’s freshman walk-on was awarded the game ball after Saturday’s victory. That a high school athlete better known for his wrestling ability was able to play such a significant role in the first half of the Irish season without ever taking the field says something about his value to the team.

“The guys love him. He sang the fight song,” Kelly said Sunday. “That’s the first time we had a true freshman stand up, and he got the game ball and sang the fight song, and there was a huge roar from the team.”

Regan helped give Notre Dame their best practice look at the option. And while he’ll never be Keenan Reynolds or Justin Thomas, he makes decisions at game-speed, something vital to the team’s preparation.

After surviving a week of getting pounded by Notre Dame’s starting defense, Regan became the first walk-on in Kelly’s memory to ever receive a game ball.


Justin Yoon. After looking really shaky earlier in the season, Yoon jump-started the Irish with a career-long 52-yard field goal as the first half expired, and was pure on every one of his other kick attempts, too.

After drilling a big field goal at Clemson in the rain storm, Yoon seems to have regained his confidence and the momentum he had going during fall camp, something he talked about after the game.

“Trying to get my momentum as a freshman wasn’t easy. A freshman going on the football field for the first time is a big spotlight, and that’s a difficult experience,” Yoon said. “I’ve progressed through the games, my teammates have put their trust in me. That’s the biggest thing.”


Jarrett Grace. We touched on this postgame, but Grace’s role meant more to the team that just a veteran backup making some big plays when his number was called. Inserted into the game to try and add some bulk to the Irish defense, Grace played big minutes, something that Kelly couldn’t help but marvel at during the Sunday teleconference.

“It was as meaningful for him as it was for me, just to know what he’s gone through and to be called upon to come in and play a very important role for us,” Kelly said. “If you watched him last year in August and September, you’d say there’s no way he’s going to be able to play again…

“To see him get out there and play on Saturday was pretty gratifying that he could get out there and help us.”

Kelly mentioned that in Grace’s introduction before speaking at the pep rally, he only had highlights from special teams. He knew that was selling him short, perhaps a good final reminder that the Cincinnati native could help this defense play smash-mouth football.

“He was one of our speakers at the pep rally, and all they showed him was on special teams, and I was like, dang, he’s much more than that.”


Quick Hits: 

* Another option opponent, another monster day by Greer Martini. Notre Dame’s sophomore linebacker has been a wonderful weapon for the Irish in triple-option games, mostly because of his ability to do his job.

“He’s got a really good understanding of his job and he’s a disciplined player, so when we ask him to do his job, he’s going to get it done,” Kelly said. “He just fits really well with the scheme that we’re employing and so it’s just a really good fit.”

* He already earned mention in our Five Things yesterday, but Sheldon Day‘s been incredibly disruptive, as we saw with nine tackles and two TFLs.

* Another game, another monster day from C.J. Prosise. While some want Prosise to get the national attention they feel like he deserves, it should be enough that he’s filling the stat sheet while also learning what he’s doing.

Prosise still isn’t the natural inside the tackles runner you might want a 220-pounder to be, but his ability to get to the edge and run through tackles is really, really impressive.

* It doesn’t seem fair when DeShone Kizer buys time rolling out and then finds Will Fuller. Not too many defenses can stop that type of scramble drill, and Kizer’s ability to keep his eyes down field is really impressive for a young kid.

* Coming into the game Navy was one of the best 3rd down teams in the country. Notre Dame’s defense held them to just 2-of-11.



A tough start. If you were thinking the Irish were in for a long Saturday after going three-and-out and then letting Keenan Reynolds slice and dice the defense in under 80 seconds, you weren’t alone. (I was with you.) But credit this group for showing resilience.

Kelly talked about not letting that start get in the way, especially after a good week of practice.

“I thought we responded very well offensively. And I think that response in scoring right away, kind of settled everybody down,” Kelly said.


Interior running struggles. Notre Dame attacked the perimeter yesterday, with C.J. Prosise getting to the edges via the quick pass or outside handoffs. But the Irish seemed to struggle running north and south, disappointing against a defense like Navy’s.

Alex Bars started for the first time, as Quenton Nelson’s ankle wasn’t ready to be tested. Nick Martin will need to get healthy after a tweaked ankle. But against USC, the Irish will need to be able to move the point of attack, something they didn’t necessarily do consistently against the Midshipmen.


Consistency in the secondary. It didn’t take long for Max Redfield to be replaced by Matthias Farley, especially after Redfield missed tackles while overrunning his alley. And while Elijah Shumate’s interception was a great step forward and Navy’s quarterbacks completed just three of six throws for 22 yards, the performance of the back end of the defense is still the one thing holding this defense back.

Kelly talked about what he wants to see from his secondary, and how two games against option competition might have actually been part of the problem this year.

“I still think consistency in the back end of our defense,” Kelly cited when asked where the team needs its best growth. “I think that’s the biggest thing. It’s kind of difficult. We played two option teams over the last four weeks. It makes it hard to continue to evolve defensively. I think that’s probably the area that we want to see continued growth is the back end of our defense.”

With USC’s talented skill players coming to town and the Irish just a season removed from getting absolutely demolished in coverage at the Coliseum, all eyes will be on Shumate, Redfield, KeiVarae Russell and Cole Luke next weekend.



Call it a big victory or call it mutual respect, your choice. This section is staying empty after a 17-point win.

Five things we learned: Notre Dame 41, Navy 24


Notre Dame beat Navy for the fifth-straight time on Saturday afternoon, sprinting away from the Midshipmen after a strong third quarter and cruising to a 41-24 win. Against one of Ken Niumatalolo’s best teams, the Irish handed Navy their first loss of the season, winning the turnover battle 3-1 while also holding the Midshipmen to just 102 yards in the second half.

As an annual opponent, Notre Dame’s yearly dates against Navy usually fit into one of four categories: The program-rattling loss, the white knuckle, pray-you-get-out-alive close victory, the frisky battle where the Irish pull away, and the occasional boat race. Expect Brian Kelly to place this one in the third bucket, and then be thankful that Notre Dame can go about their business for the rest of the season.

“Thank gosh,” Kelly said after the game, when told he was done preparing for the option until next season.

No, it wasn’t pretty. Led by Keenan Reynolds and a powerful pair of fullbacks, Navy ran for 238 yards in the first half. But after Justin Yoon kicked a 52-yard field goal to close the first half, the Irish forced a turnover on the opening kickoff of the third quarter and scored touchdowns on their first two drives. That was essentially that.

Navy knew they needed to play perfect to beat Brian Kelly’s most talented team. And with two personal foul penalties, three turnovers and some missed opportunities, Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo was frustrated the Midshipmen didn’t bring their best to South Bend.

“We knew we need to play perfect against these guys and this was probably our worst game of the season,” Niumatalolo said. “Against a good team like Notre Dame, that spells disaster.”

Let’s find out what we learned during the Irish’s 17-point win.


Georgia Tech and Navy are behind Notre Dame and the Irish went 2-0. But more importantly, a system has been established inside the program on how to defend and practice against the option. 

Brian Kelly gave the game ball to scout-team quarterback Rob Regan, the recruited walk-on who came to Notre Dame to most likely never step on the field and get beaten up by the starting defense at practice. But Regan did his job well this season, providing a critical service as the quarterback of the triple-option scout team known as the SWAG team.

While there were some struggles early getting to the fullback dive and keeping Keenan Reynolds contained, Kelly talked about how happy he was with the week of practice the Irish had, focused solely on the task at hand, not the devastating loss from a week earlier or the date with USC next weekend.

“We beat a very good team by 17 points. That’s validation,” Kelly said. “I thought we had a great week of practice. I thought we prepared very well. I don’t know what else to do… I was so pleased with the way they were focused during the week, preparing for Navy.”

Credit for this victory starts nine months ago, with senior advisor Bob Elliott taking a deep dive into the option. And as Notre Dame devised a game plan to keep the option a consistent part of every week’s preparation—not just a crash course the week of Navy or Georgia Tech—from a program-building perspective, Kelly feels confident that he and his coaches have devised a way to successfully defend one of the most schematically challenging games of each season.

“There’s always things we can work on to get better,” Kelly said, after being asked about his team’s job against the option this season. “But I think we’ve established something that I wanted to establish: A base way to play option teams. ”



C.J. Prosise has emerged as Notre Dame’s leading man on offense. And he continues to get better and better as he learns on the job.  

Leading Notre Dame’s offense with 129 yards and three touchdowns, C.J. Prosise put together his fourth 100-yard day of the season on the ground. His three touchdowns mark the second time Prosise has scored a hat trick this season, the first time that’s happened at Notre Dame since Reggie Brooks pulled the same feat in 1992.

Prosise was deadly on the perimeter of the defense, breaking off big-chunk runs, including a 22-yard touchdown. (He had another long touchdown run called back for a questionable hold.) Adding 56 receiving yards to his stat-line—glorified runs that required DeShone Kizer to quick flip the ball to Prosise—and Notre Dame’s game plan was to get Prosise on the perimeter and let him utilize his unique blend of size and speed.

“We were trying to find different ways to get him on the perimeter,” Kelly explained postgame. “Just trying to get one of our skilled players on the edge of our defense was part of our plan.”

The plan worked, with Prosise once again serving as the engine of the Irish offense. But even more impressive is the senior’s evolution. Just five games into his career as a running back, he’s become the identity of Notre Dame’s offense.

Kelly credits that to a balanced offensive attack, acknowledging that the run game will be their secret to success. But he also praised Prosise’s preparation, a senior digging into his job like a freshman just learning the ropes.

“I think what I like most about him is that he’s in that learning curve and he’s excited every single day, working to become a better running back,” Kelly said.


Notre Dame’s ability to force turnovers and disrupt Navy’s offense turned this into a relatively easy Irish victory. 

You couldn’t have asked for a tougher start. After returning the opening kickoff, Notre Dame went three-and-out. It took the Midshipmen just three plays to go 70 yards, scoring in just 74 seconds. But after weathering the storm, the Irish actually became the team that forced the mistakes, usually the other way around when these two teams play each other.

Two fumble recoveries and a very nice interception by Elijah Shumate gave Notre Dame an extra handful of possessions against Navy, one of the keys to beating the Midshipmen. And while Notre Dame’s offensive efficiency wasn’t through the roof, having a few extra possessions more than nullified the two punts and DeShone Kizer’s lone interception.

“Huge possessions. We were able to gain more possessions in this game than any other game we’ve played against Navy,” Kelly said postgame.


While the defense certainly didn’t lock down Navy’s option like they did Georgia Tech’s, they do deserve some credit for the struggles the Midshipmen had converting drives. Even after going four of four on fourth-down conversions, the Irish got Navy off the field six of ten times without scoring points, forcing two punts, two fumbles, an interception and a missed field goal.

Pair the defensive effort with Notre Dame’s offense controlling the clock in the second half after scoring two early touchdowns, and it’s a perfect recipe for victory against Navy.


Sheldon Day is playing the type of dominant football Notre Dame fans have been expecting for three seasons. 

From the moment Sheldon Day stepped onto campus, Notre Dame coaches thought they had something special. And during his senior season, Day is showing why.

The senior captain tied for the team lead with nine tackles on Saturday, adding two more TFLs in the process. Tasked with what he called the easiest job of anybody on the defense against the option, Day managed to wreak havoc in the trenches against consistent double teams, making up for some of the early troubles the Irish defense had slowing down Navy’s stout fullbacks and Keenan Reynolds to open the game.

Day played nearly the entire snap, shifting outside and in, taking on multiple Navy blockers as he went toe-to-toe. And after Jerry Tillery sat most of the second half with what looked like an elbow injury, Day’s consistency and work volume proved vital, with really no backup behind him.

Debating a departure to the NFL after last season, Brian Kelly and Jack Swarbrick pitched Day on the many reasons why coming back to South Bend and earning his degree would be important. Now Day’s also showing NFL scouts what the Irish staff knew all along.


The Irish once again went to their depth chart to lock down a victory.

With the Irish defense struggling with some scheme tweaks and in need of a fix against Navy’s option, Brian Kelly once again called on his depth chart to help secure the victory. Kelly made two very big moves to help slow down Navy, and both paid dividends.

Starter Max Redfield had the first shot at playing safety. But after over-running his assignment on Keenan Reynolds, Matthias Farley entered the game and didn’t come off the field until tallied seven tackles and sang the alma mater.

Kelly also went bigger with his linebacking corps. Already starting Greer Martini at one linebacker spot, the Irish swapped former wide receiver James Onwualu out of the game and inserted senior Jarrett Grace. The 255-pounder helped plug the leak that Navy’s fullbacks exploited in the first half, part of the reason Notre Dame held Chris Swain and Quenin Ezell to just 3.8 yards a touch in the second half.

“We went with Grace in the second half and he was able to get himself down onto the fullback in the second half,” Kelly said. “It was a little bit of scheme and a little bit of execution. They keep prodding and looking for opporutnities to run their offense and they did effectively until we made some adjustments at halftime.”

The opportunity for Grace had to be a cherished one and you could see the veteran’s confidence grow as the game continued. After two seasons recovering from a severely broken leg, Grace earned his first extensive playing time on defense this afternoon. While he tapped his chest and acknowledged he was late to his assignment on his first snap in after replacing Onwualu, Grace was in and around the pile nonstop, putting a big stick on quarterback Keenan Reynolds on a fake then making five tackles as he showed that the Irish have another weapon at their disposal as they get back to their winning ways.






Where to watch: Notre Dame vs. Navy

Keenan Reynolds, Justin Utopo, Cole Luke

Saturday afternoon, Notre Dame and Navy will do battle for the 89th straight season. But if you’re not in South Bend, or can’t park in front of a computer, we’ve got you covered.

NBC’s coverage of the Irish and Midshipmen features a pregame show on NBCSN and a postgame recap to follow. You can always watch on the NBC Sports Live Extra app.

Here’s how to watch Navy vs. Notre Dame:

3:00 p.m. — Pregame Show (NBCSN)
3:30 p.m.  — Navy vs. Notre Dame (NBC)
7:00 p.m.  — Postgame Show (NBCSN)


With an HD feed, DVR capabilities and a bonus camera, logging in and watching from your tablet or mobile phone makes it easier than ever to catch Notre Dame on NBC.