Keith Arnold

Behind the Irish: Worldwide support

11 Comments

You didn’t need to be in Dublin to kickoff the 2012 season to understand the reach of Notre Dame football. But our final “Behind the Irish” for the season takes a look at the global support the Irish football team receives, thanks to a passionate group of fans that cover the entire globe.

Listen to current Irish players like Malik Zaire, James Onwualu, Nyles Morgan and Josh Adams talk about the support they receive from one of the largest fanbases in all of sports.

And in that corner… The Virginia Tech Hokies

BLACKSBURG, VA - NOVEMBER 12: Quarterback Jerod Evans #4 of the Virginia Tech Hokies carries the ball against the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets in the first half at Lane Stadium on November 12, 2016 in Blacksburg, Virginia. (Photo by Michael Shroyer/Getty Images)
34 Comments

Notre Dame’s ACC partnership yields a new opponent this weekend, as Virginia Tech and the Irish meet for the first time. After Frank Beamer took his alma mater to unparalleled heights and a national profile on the football field, he turned the program over to Justin Fuente, and the former Memphis coach has done big things in his first year in Blacksburg.

With transfer quarterback Jerod Evans behind center, Fuente has the Hokies offense back on track. Inheriting long-time defensive coordinator Bud Foster keeps Virginia Tech’s defense among the most aggressive and stingy in the country.

To get us ready for this weekend’s game, I’m joined by Faizan Hasnany, the sports editor for the Collegiate Times, the student newspaper at Virginia Tech. Born in Pakistan and raised in Northern Virginia, Faizan is a senior studying Business Information Technology with a passion for sports analytics.

In the middle of a chaotic week and a packed course load, he took some time to get us educated on the Hokies. Hope you enjoy.
* The change from Frank Beamer to Justin Fuente appeared (from afar) to be one of the best transitions from coaching legend to new leader. Can you speak to the job Fuente has done so far, and how he’s handled taking over for the guy who essentially built the Hokies into what they are?

Justin Fuente has done an incredible job so far taking over for Frank Beamer, and has really won over the fanbase at Virginia Tech. It was definitely a very smooth tranistion for him, since Beamer left behind so much returning talent on both sides of the ball and since the Hokies did retain Bud Foster at defensive coordinator.

The one thing that sticks out to me about Fuente is that he doesn’t show a lot of emotion particularly after wins and losses. He is a firm believer in going 1-0 in each week, a statement that is echoed by him and his players numerous times in every press conference.

 

* Jerod Evans is having a big season. His two interceptions against Georgia Tech doubled his season total and he’s thrown 22 touchdown passes while being the Hokies leading rusher. There were great expectations for the JUCO transfer before he arrived. Has he exceeded them?

Surprisingly, with Jerod Evans, despite being such a highly touted JUCO recruit, nobody was truly certain until the season started that he would be Tech’s starting quarterback. Evans and redshirt-senior Brenden Motley, who filled in as the starter for Michael Brewer most of last season, split first team reps throughout the entire offseason.

That being said, Evans undoubtedly exceeded expectations, and is on his way to surpassing Tyrod Taylor’s record for most passing touchdowns in a season of 24. He has also led the Hokies in every rushing category with 608 yards on 132 attempts and six touchdowns on the ground.

 

* Hiring Fuente felt like a coup for Virginia Tech. But getting Bud Foster to stay as defensive coordinator may have been even bigger. How has that relationship been, considering some people expected Foster to be the guy who took over for Beamer when he hung them up?

Retaining Bud Foster as defensive coordinator was huge for Virginia Tech. In addition to his abilities as a defensive coordinator and recruiter, Foster has also been important by just giving the Hokies continuity and easing the transition between head coaches.

The relationship between Fuente and Foster seems great so far, with Fuente granting Foster the freedom to just keep doing what he has been all these years as the main defensive playcaller for the Hokies.

 

* Tremaine Edmunds and Woody Baron are wreaking havoc behind the line of scrimmage for the Hokies, a combined 31 TFLs and 9 sacks between them. What do they do so well that allows them to be so disruptive? What other defenders will be key in slowing down DeShone Kizer and the Irish offense?

Both Woody Baron and Tremaine Edmunds are exceptionally athletic and quick at their positions, allowing them to get in the backfield with ease. Baron is very explosive off the ball and has great hands and technique.

Another player on the defensive end who will be a key in slowing down Kizer and the Irish offense will be Tremaine’s brother, Terrell Edmunds. Terrell has 61 tackles this year along with three interceptions and six passes defended and is extremely versatile at that rover position.

 

The lopsided loss to Georgia Tech seemed to be a huge let down. Was that a product of facing a triple-option opponent—something Irish fans know well—or an inconsistent team still learning how to play under a new head coach?

The loss to Georgia Tech showed on full display something that has plagued the Hokies defense consistently in recent years. Not specifically the triple option, but just mobile quarterbacks in general that the Tech defense has struggled with.

 

* Vegas has Notre Dame slightly favored at home on Senior Day, yet the Hokies are tied for 1st in the ACC Coastal division while the Irish are fighting for postseason eligibility. In the first ever matchup between these two programs, how big of a game is this for Hokie fans, and what does VT need to do to earn their eighth win?

This is definitely a big game for the Hokies being that it is the first matchup between the two and they don’t want to drop two games in a row at this point in the season, though it is probably a bigger game for the Irish, fighting for postseason eligibility. Since it is an out of conference match-up this game won’t have any implications on Tech’s chances at winning the division. Tech will need a consistent offensive performance up front from its line. Last week they allowed five sacks and were unable to create holes consistently to get the run game going.

 

Kelly prepared for unique Senior Day send-off

SOUTH BEND, IN - NOVEMBER 17:  Players, coaches, cheerleaders and students for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish sing at alma mater following a win over the Wake Forest Demon Deacons at Notre Dame Stadium on November 17, 2012 in South Bend, Indiana. Notre Dame defeated Wake Forest 38-0.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
9 Comments

Notre Dame will honor the program’s seniors on Saturday, a send-off that would be made sweeter with a victory over Virginia Tech. But while Brian Kelly will greet and appreciate 28 seniors who’ll run out of the tunnel in the season’s final home game, he’s hopeful that this won’t be goodbye for most.

Because while Jarron Jones, James Onwualu, Isaac Rochell, Cole Luke, Mark Harrell, Scott Daly and Avery Sebastian are saying goodbye, there’s plenty of eligibility remaining.

So that turns Senior Day into a different one than most. Especially when Notre Dame’s head coach thinks back to what could have been.

“We don’t have as many seniors that have used up their eligibility,” Kelly explained when asked about the emotions of the upcoming weekend. “I’m crying right now because I don’t have Will Fuller. He didn’t have a senior day. Jaylon Smith, Ronnie Stanley, Kavari Russell, is that enough?

“Those guys, they’re all juniors, and they really didn’t have a true senior day. And then there’s a number of guys that have eligibility remaining. So it’s kind of changed a little bit. Where my first couple of years you knew who those guys were. Now it’s a lot grayer as to who is a senior and who’s not a senior.”

That gray area is a source of optimism, especially for a staff looking to build on the tail-end of the season. So while the decisions on staying or going will be left until later, Saturday’s game will honor the group of established contributors that’ll be playing for a final time in an Irish uniform.

Kelly singled out his two graduating captains, seniors James Onwualu and Isaac Rochell, strong leaders who led from the front during a challenging season.

“The hardest workers during our toughest times were Isaac Rochell and James Onwualu in particular, those two guys,” Kelly said. “It was crucial when we made a change defensively, playing all those freshmen, we needed guys to lead by example. We didn’t need a guy yelling and screaming. And those two guys led by example.”

As much as this season turned into taking lumps and getting experience, there’s always going to be some of that in South Bend, a place that forces student-athletes to graduate before applying for a fifth-year. While that gives veterans and role players a shot at college football’s version of free agency, Kelly understands that’s part of the deal.

More importantly, if he’s doing his job, he expects more senior days like this one.

“When you have really good football players that have the opportunity to go to the NFL, that’s going to be a reality here at Notre Dame,” Kelly said. “I’d love for everybody to stay and use their four years of eligibility, and have their degree and do all that. But the reality of it is that those situations are going to keep coming up.”

BK breaks down Shamrock Series win

19 Comments

Before Brian Kelly breaks down Virginia Tech on Tuesday, listen to BK talk about the Shamrock Series victory with Watch ND’s Jack Nolan.

He discussed the development of Kevin Stepherson and C.J. Sanders‘ kickoff return to jumpstart the effort. He also talks about the defensive play by veterans like Cole Luke, James Onwualu and Isaac Rochell as well as youngsters like Julian Love.

The good, the bad, the ugly: Notre Dame vs. Army

SAN ANTONIO, TX - NOVEMBER 12: Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly leads his team onto the field before the start of their game against Army in a NCAA college football game at the Alamodome on November 12, 2016 in San Antonio, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Cortes/Getty Images)
Getty
36 Comments

The Shamrock Series was a snoozer. But that doesn’t mean it wasn’t refreshing. After all, that’s what a good nap does. Recharge the batteries, unplug for a moment, and wake-up refreshed and ready to tackle what’s ahead.

Let’s hope that’s what Army does for this Irish team. Because what’s ahead looks daunting, even if Virginia Tech had its own problems with the triple option.

With two weeks left in the regular season and Notre Dame needing to sweep weekends with the Hokies and that scrappy upstart in South-Central Los Angeles, a postseason bowl berth may only get the Irish an extra handful of practices before a tier-two destination, but the reward will be much greater.

Because in a year like this, that’s enough to feel good about the season—at least from a momentum perspective. (Relax, everyone—just from a momentum perspective.)

So with the Hokies preparing for South Bend and Senior Day ahead, let’s take a look at the good, bad and ugly from Notre Dame vs. Army.

 

THE GOOD

James Onwualu. This might be one of those seasons that gets overlooked because of the performance of the team as a whole. But Onwualu’s senior year is everything you could’ve asked for from the captain, leading the defense in TFLs and just a single pass break up behind the team leader, his diversity on display both on the stat sheet as well as on the field.

On Saturday, Onwualu led the Irish in tackles with 13 stops and also made a few key plays behind the line of scrimmage. He was comfortable in coverage and chasing down the quarterback. He played like a natural at a position that was hardly his first stop.

Onwualu came into Notre Dame as a wide receiver after playing everywhere on the high school field. After starting games as a freshman (mostly for his blocking), he moved across the line of scrimmage and immediately found his way onto the field, starts in all four seasons in one of the more impressive developmental trajectories we’ve seen in the Kelly era.

 

Durham SmytheLooks who’s getting at home in the opponent’s end zone? Smythe, a senior we’ve waited to see break loose for the better part of his four seasons, did so against Army, two catches and two touchdowns.

End zone safety valve is a much better place to be than thanking quarterback DeShone Kizer for saving his rear end after his goal line fumble against Miami very nearly put the game at risk. And after two-straight games with scores, Smythe is on his way to getting some of that missing tight end production back.

Smythe had his big game a few hours from his hometown, scoring twice in front of family and friends. And while he won’t become the next Tyler Effect or Kyle Rudolph, Brian Kelly praised the veteran for carrying the load this season, especially after losing Alizé Jones before the season.

“Durham is a veteran. He’s seen a lot of things, played a lot of football,” Kelly said. “I’ll tell you his biggest contribution is he’s a guy that has to do a lot for us, whether he’s blocking or running vertical routes or option routes. He’s asked to do a lot. He’s a committed player. He’s high character and well-respected by his teammates.”

 

Julian Love. Notre Dame’s freshman earned himself a heap of praise postgame and I was ready to anoint him the next big thing in the Irish secondary, too. Even if his stat-line didn’t wow you—three tackles (half a TFL) and an interception—his ability to step in at safety and play strong in support gives you a taste of just how cerebral Love is as a football player.

Love led the Irish defense from a PFF grading perspective, a credit to his job in coverage as well as his steady run support. And after the game, he earned a whole lot of praise from his teammates.

“If he can keep it up and still have the off-the-field traits and still work hard, I think he definitely has the potential to be a captain,” fellow cornerback Cole Luke told Irish Illustrated’s Pete Sampson.

“To a lot of people football is important but it’s not everything. To Julian football is important and it’s damn near everything. It’s very close. He shows it in practice, he shows it on the field too.”

There isn’t anything that Love does that jumps out at you. He’s not the biggest, fastest, or freakiest guy on the field. But as this secondary looks for a new foundation next season, Love might be a key piece, capable of playing just about anywhere.

 

Quick Hits: 

Another option opponent, another monster game by Greer Martini. His two-play sequence essentially shut down an Army red zone appearance, with Martini stuffing back-to-back plays for the Black Knights in scoring range.

Let’s thankfully put to rest the Jarron Jones doesn’t like playing against the option. (What defensive lineman does?) The fifth-year senior played 20 snaps—a handful of them with the game well out of reach and he was productive in run support. He only made two tackles, but he graded out as the team’s second-best front seven player in run support.

The postgame, he won with this tweet.

DeShone Kizer‘s completion percentage was only a shade above 60 percent, but he seemed better on the possession throws and once again was rock-solid on third down. Watching Kizer work through his reads and get to both sides of the field was a nice benefit to the offensive line holding its own.

He certainly doesn’t have that next gear, but Tarean Folston sure looks smooth running the football. He’ll be an interesting fifth-year candidate, a year of eligibility remaining but uncertain to win any more carries.

What we see from Folston these next two weeks is anybody’s guess. But it’d be great to see him pick up some critical carries, and even better if he’s able to add a spark.

It was very good to see Malik Zaire out there running around with the football. Well deserved, even if he didn’t get a chance to air it out.

Welcome to the starting lineup, Mark Harrell. The fifth-year senior finally earned a start and backed it up with a strong performance in the trenches. At this point, you almost have to think that Harrell will get the chance to do it again against Virginia Tech, the right guard job up for grabs it appears.

C.J. Sanders. Can’t ask to start a football game any better.

 

THE BAD

For the first time this year, nobody stands out for solo billing. But let’s run through a few (mostly ticky-tacky) issues I spotted:

Center Sam Mustipher had another clean game snapping the football. But he had his hands full with nose tackle Andrew McLean. Mustipher graded out really poorly per PFF, giving McLean his best game on the season by a multiple of four.

Kevin Stepherson looks like the real deal on the outside. But if he wants to emulate Will Fuller, letting sure touchdowns slide through his hands is the one part of Fuller’s game he could ignore.

I liked the fact that Jon Bonner got a ton of snaps on the interior of the defensive line. I’d have liked it better if he played a little bit better against the run.

 

UGLY

Glad to leave this empty for a week. Especially glad not to include those Shamrock Series uniforms. They might have been my favorite of the group.