Keith Arnold

Cody Kessler

Irish haven’t forgotten embarrassment in Coliseum

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In a 2014 season where USC quarterback Cody Kessler lit up the stat sheet, one game stands above the rest—his decimation of Notre Dame. The Pac-12’s most accurate quarterback had a career day against an undermanned Irish defense, completing 80 percent of his 40 throws, gashing the Irish for 372 yards and a ridiculous six touchdown passes.

While the current Irish defense barely resembles the group that was forced to take the field last season, it’s pretty clear that this Notre Dame football team won’t forget that afternoon in the Coliseum any time soon.

“It was an embarrassment. I think it’s fair to say that,” Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly acknowledged on Tuesday.

On what Kelly called a “red-letter day,” the Irish were blown out against USC, a place they last visited to clinch a trip to the BCS Championship game. Last year’s matchup had the Trojans’ immensely talented group of skill players exposing Notre Dame’s ability to cover—and tackle—in space. This year, some of the same players that were on the field for that blowout, will need to step their game up.

Safeties Elijah Shumate and Matthias Farley played a significant part of that game. Max Redfield did as well, until a rib injury pulled him from action. After playing strong football all season against a difficult schedule, Cole Luke had his worst Saturday of the season. Devin Butler struggled in coverage as well, forced into action after Cody Riggs’ foot wouldn’t let him answer the bell.

Yes, KeiVarae Russell will be playing this year, a huge addition to a group that needs his athleticism and competitiveness on the field. And more importantly, Notre Dame’s front seven will actually look like their front seven. But after watching Washington successfully disrupt Kessler and force him into one of his career-worst performances, the Irish will attempt to do the same.

“We saw what he did against us last year when we weren’t able to generate any pressure against him. It was shooting fish in a barrel against us,” Kelly said. “So I think it’s very important that we get him moving his feet, but I think that that’s probably every defensive coordinator’s objective in every game, to get the quarterback out of rhythm.

“He’s hard to do that with. So we have to launch a plan that certainly gets him out of rhythm. If you can do that, you can have success with any quarterback, not just Cody Kessler.”

The Trojans are missing starting center Max Tuerk, an All-Pac 12 standout. Coming off a bye week, USC played one of its worst games up front, though their running game as remarkably stout, averaging 6.3 yards per carry when you take out Kessler’s sack yardage.

The battle in the trenches will help dictate how the Irish do against the pass, the two units sharing responsibility for slowing down a USC offense that has struggled to reach its potential at times this season. But ultimately, the secondary’s ability to stay in coverage will determine how aggressive the Irish can be in their pursuit of Kessler.

“If you can play man coverage, you get a lot more variety, and certainly we feel like we can play man,” Kelly said. “That allows us to do some more things, and we feel Cole and KeiVarae are capable of doing that.”

After living through one of the ugliest Saturdays in recent Irish football memory, the Irish expect an better outcome this weekend. But they’ll have to slow down a scary offense to achieve it.

USC Mailbag: Now Open

LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 06:  A U.S. Postal service employee leaves the loading dock to deliver mail from the Los Feliz Post Office on February 6, 2013 in Los Angeles, California. The U.S. Postal Service plans to end Saturday delivery of first-class mail by August, which could save the service $2 billion annually after losing nearly $16 billion last fiscal year.  (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
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With the week half over and USC just around the corner, let’s reopen the mailbag. Drop your questions below or on Twitter @KeithArnold.

 

 

And in that corner… The USC Trojans

against the Arizona State University Sun Devils at Sun Devil Stadium on September 26, 2015 in Tempe, Arizona.
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Every time Notre Dame plays USC, there’s intrigue. But while most thought the Trojans’ loss to Washington last Thursday night dampened the enthusiasm for a potential matchup of two Top-15 programs, the abrupt dismissal of Steve Sarkisian changed everything.

On a Saturday packed full of big-time matchups, Notre Dame’s game with the Trojans might not be the biggest when it comes to playoff implications. But all of college football will be watching as USC plays for interim head coach Clay Helton, in charge of steering the Trojans through some remarkably rough waters. Helton is the fourth different head coach to face Notre Dame in four years, shocking after Pete Carroll’s tenure building one of the finest programs of the modern era.

There to see it all has been Shotgun Spratling. One of the busiest guys on the SoCal beat, Shotgun covers the Trojans for Scout’s USCFootball.com among the half dozen other places you’ll find his byline.

In one of the craziest weeks I can remember, Shotgun brought his A-game. Enjoy.

 

Okay, let’s tackle the Steve Sarkisian suspension / firing from a football perspective first. How badly does this impact USC’s preparation for Notre Dame this weekend? What do you expect from this team now that Clay Helton is the man in charge? 

Strangely, the craziness swirling around Heritage Hall this week might actually be good for the Trojans. When any kind of big incident happens in life, “work” can be a welcomed distraction. You can lock in and focus on one thing rather than being bothered by everything else. The player that might hang out in the quad, go to a party or any other social activity might instead spend the extra hour or two watching film in their room. No one wants to answer a constant barrage of questions about someone else’s actions.

With Clay Helton’s experience taking over previously and having gone through the interim experience before, he has a great idea of what will work and what may not to get the team motivated and focused in this type of situation. If the leaders on the team step up and show the right maturity, the Trojans are likely to have an “us against the world” type of attitude.

 

Off the field, this is a horrendous story for a jillion reasons. What do you make of the 180 Pat Haden made in the time between Sunday’s meeting with the media and Monday’s decision to fire Sark? And what do you make of the man in charge of Trojan sports? He’s coming under pressure now, too, and understandably when you look at the direction football and basketball programs have gone, not to mention the gamble on Sark. 

I don’t think it was necessarily a 180 as much as Pat Haden needed some time to digest, research and decipher what exactly had just happened. He was at a basketball event at the Galen Center when he was informed Sarkisian wasn’t at practice. I actually saw him leaving as I was arriving for the event and he definitely did not have a smile on his face. Sarkisian was scheduled to speak to reporters after the Sunday afternoon practice, so when he was unavailable, someone had to take his place. That put the wheels in motion and somewhat forced Haden to make a comment.

After he had a day to determine exactly what was going on, rather than an hour, I’m sure he was able to take his findings to the legal team, those he trusts and those he reports to and eventually come to the decision of firing Sarkisian. More than a 180, I think this was ultimately a progression of events during the 24-hour span.

Haden is coming under a lot of fire for the Sarkisian hire and that pressure definitely should be on his shoulders. This was his guy and Haden has said that Sarkisian was vetted “extensively” prior to his hire. The biggest concern is that Sarkisian had been known in coaching circles to have a good time. Obviously, if done responsibly, there’s nothing wrong with that and by virtue of him having no previous incidents or run-ins with authorities, you likely assume that he had done so responsibly in the past. But with abuse of any substance, there is almost always an escalation. Sarkisian is currently in the midst of a divorce and potentially losing his three kids as well. What effect did that have on him?

After former basketball coach Kevin O’Neill had an incident that involved alcohol and led to a suspension, it seems Haden should have come down more stringent against Sarkisian after the Salute to Troy event before the season began. If he did, maybe we all wouldn’t be in the current situation.

 

All of this comes after USC laid an incredible egg against Washington in the Coliseum on Thursday. Did you see that coming? And how did the Trojan offense get stopped?

The last five years while I’ve been in Los Angeles, I’ve grown to expect the unexpected. Thursday night’s game was very similar to the Washington State game in Lane Kiffin’s final half season. Turnovers and offensive ineptitude allowed an inferior team to beat a USC squad with vastly superior talent.

The offense actually stopped itself more than it got stopped. During the Arizona State game, the Sun Devils blitzed constantly and completely shut down the rushing attack, but rather than constantly trying to run it (which UCLA tried and failed to do the next week), USC attacked with the pass. Washington was the exact opposite. With big running lanes and continued struggles in the passing game, partially due to losing All-American center Max Tuerk and two starting receivers, USC didn’t just take what the Husky defense was giving them.

They continually tried to fling it around the yard. After a fourth quarter touchdown drive that featured a pass to a running back and four runs for 46 yards, USC got the ball back and went three-and-out on three consecutive pass plays. Then on a critical third-and-6 from the 25-yard line — an area Sarkisian has often run on third down when he plans to go for it on fourth down — the Trojans tried to pass despite the four previous runs on the drive averaging 7.5 yards per attempt. Cody Kessler, who had an uncharacteristically poor performance, took a sack and then USC inexplicably attempted a field goal down five points and Washington needing just a first down to assure that it could run out the clock.

 

Notre Dame’s had its share of injury woes. Now it appears the bug has caught the Trojans. All Pac-12 center Max Tuerk is done for the year with a knee injury. Defensive lineman Claude Pelon looks doubtful. What’s the status of this team physically?

Unfortunately, all of college football has been subject to injuries. It’s terrible, but the sport is becoming a war of attrition. The team with the best top-end talent is rarely going to win any more, but the team with the most quality depth has a much better chance.

Any time you lose an All-American caliber player like Tuerk it’s a big blow. Not only is he strong at his position, but he made all the calls on the offensive line, so he made his offensive line mates stronger as well. But even more important is that he was the “heart and soul of the offensive line and probably the offense” as sophomore lineman Viane Talamaivao told me after the game. It was an emotional blow to the unit. But the good thing is that the Trojans had been rotating in seven offensive linemen most of the time. Now Talamaivao just moves into the starting lineup. Toa Lobendahn, who is the Swiss Army knife of the unit, takes over at center where some think he should have been playing to begin with (with Tuerk moving back to tackle where he began his career). If Lobendahn makes the right calls, there might not be much of a discernible drop off.

Other injuries the Trojans are currently dealing with include Claude Pelon, who is doubtful after a knee sprain that saw his leg go a different direction than the rest of his body, and a pair of receivers. One of the Trojans best blockers and most consistent route runners, Darreus Rogers, was injured on the first play from scrimmage against Arizona State and missed the Washington game while explosive slot receiver Steven Mitchell Jr. took a direct hit below the knee while being wrapped up by another defender right before halftime last week. Rogers should be back, barring a setback, but he’s dealing with a hamstring pull and those are easy to re-injure. Mitchell Jr. is questionable. Freshman starting cornerback Iman Marshall (abdominal) also left the Washington game after a vicious blindside hit, but he is expected to play this weekend.

 

Last year, the Trojans torched an injury-ravaged Notre Dame defense in the Coliseum. This year, the key matchup will be an Irish secondary that’s underperforming take on the SC skill talent. How confident do the Trojans feel about this matchup?

You can bet that USC will show some clips from last season’s game leading up to this weekend’s visit to South Bend and it will be repeated over and over to the offensive line that they have to give Kessler some time in order for there to be a repeat performance. Explosive plays have been the Trojans’ calling card all season and that’s definitely a matchup they’ll try to exploit. But the injuries to Rogers, Mitchell Jr. and Marshall (because all the cornerbacks need to be healthy in order for the always dangerous Adoree’ Jackson to have extensive side on the offensive side) could play a big role.

 

Can this team keep it together? Can Helton’s ascent be similar to what happened when Coach O took over?

If there is any team equipped with trial-by-fire leaders, it’s this squad. Fifth-year senior Cody Kessler may have the most controversy- and drama-filled tenure of any quarterback in college history. He’s pretty much seen it all with four different coaches, including Helton as the interim for the second time.

The Trojans need to circle the wagons and take on the “us against the world” philosophy as I said before. And if Helton is wise, he will draw from Ed Orgeron’s actions when he was took over as interim coach and focus on the family and make sure that everyone is playing for one another the rest of the season.

 

You’re Pat Haden. Who do you hire as the next USC head football coach? Do you think he’ll be given the chance?

All the tires will be kicked and all the rocks will be overturned. Similar to in 2013, the Trojans have a good amount of time before a hire has to be made, so there is no reason that they shouldn’t spend as much time finding the right candidate as possible.

If it was up to me, I’d really be going hard after power five conference coaches that have proven themselves already. In that regard, the first names on my list (in order) would be Gary Patterson, Dabo Swinney, Kevin Sumlin, Mark Dantonio, Kyle Whittingham and Mike Gundy. At least a passing chat with the college football bonafides (Meyer, Saban, Fisher, Miles, Stoops) would also have to take place just to gauge to see if there is any interest.

I don’t think Haden will get the chance to make the final decision, but he has a great relationship with the USC president, Max Nikias, so it’s still possible.

Even amidst chaos, Kelly expecting USC’s best

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USC head coach Steve Sarkisian was fired on Monday, with interim head coach Clay Helton taking the reins of the Trojan program during tumultuous times. Helton will be the fourth different USC head coach to face Notre Dame in as many years, illustrative of the chaos that’s shaken up Heritage Hall in the years since Pete Carroll left for the NFL.

All eyes are on the SC program, with heat on athletic director Pat Haden and the ensuing media circus that only Los Angeles can provide. But Brian Kelly doesn’t expect anything but their best when USC boards a plane to take on the Irish in South Bend.

While the majority of Notre Dame’s focus will be inward this week, Kelly did take the time on Sunday and Monday to talk with his team about the changes atop the Trojan program, and how they’ll likely impact the battle for the Jeweled Shillelagh.

“We talked about there would be an interim coach, and what that means,” Kelly said. “Teams come together under those circumstances and they’re going to play their very best. And I just reminded them of that.”

While nobody on this Notre Dame roster has experienced a coaching change, they’ve seen their share of scrutiny. The Irish managed to spring an upset not many saw coming against LSU last year in the Music City Bowl after a humiliating defeat against the Trojans and amidst the chaos of a quarterbacking controversy. And just last week, we saw Charlie Strong’s team spring an upset against arch rival Oklahoma when just about everybody left the Longhorns for dead.

“I think you look at the way Texas responded this past weekend with a lot of media scrutiny,” Kelly said Tuesday. “I expect USC to respond the same way, so we’re going to have to play extremely well.”

Outside of the head coaching departure, it’s difficult to know if there’ll be any significant difference between a team lead by Sarkisian or the one that Helton will lead into battle. The offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach has been at USC for six years, and has already held the title of interim head coach when he led the Trojans to a 2013 Las Vegas Bowl title after Lane Kiffin was fired and Ed Orgeron left the program after he wasn’t given the full time position.

Helton will likely call plays, a role he partially handled even when Sarkisian was on the sideline. The defense will still be run by Justin Wilcox. And more importantly, the game plan will be executed by a group of players that are among the most talented in the country.

“They have some of the finest athletes in the country. I’ve recruited a lot of them, and they have an immense amount of pride for their program and personal pride,” Kelly said. “So they will come out with that here at Notre Dame, there is no question about that.”

Irish add commitment from CB Donte Vaughn

Donte Vaughn
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Notre Dame’s recruiting class grew on Monday. And in adding 6-foot-3 Memphis cornerback Donte Vaughn, it grew considerably.

The Irish added another jumbo-sized skill player in Vaughn, beating out a slew of SEC offers for the intriguing cover man. Vaughn picked Notre Dame over offers from Auburn, LSU, Miami, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, Tennessee and Texas A&M among others.

He made the announcement on Monday, his 18th birthday:

It remains to be seen if Vaughn can run like a true cornerback. But his length certainly gives him a skill-set that doesn’t currently exist on the Notre Dame roster.

Interestingly enough, Vaughn’s commitment comes a cycle after Brian VanGorder made news by going after out-of-profile coverman Shaun Crawford, immediately offering the 5-foot-9 cornerback after taking over for Bob Diaco, who passed because of Crawford’s size. An ACL injury cut short Crawford’s freshman season before it got started, but not before Crawford already proved he’ll be a valuable piece of the Irish secondary for years to come.

Vaughn is another freaky athlete in a class that already features British Columbia’s Chase Claypool. With a safety depth chart that’s likely turning over quite a bit in the next two seasons, Vaughn can clearly shift over if that’s needed, though Notre Dame adding length like Vaughn clearly points to some of the shifting trends after Richard Sherman went from an average wide receiver to one of the best cornerbacks in football, and Vaughn will be asked to play on the outside.

Vaughn is the 15th member of Notre Dame’s 2016 signing class. He is the fifth defensive back, joining safeties D.J. Morgan, Jalen Elliott and Spencer Perry along with cornerback Julian Love. The Irish project to take one more.

With Notre Dame expecting another huge recruiting weekend with USC coming to town, it’ll be very interesting to see how the Irish staff close out this recruiting class.

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