Keith Arnold

247 Sports

Irish A-to-Z: Tristen Hoge

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Harry Hiestand finally recruited a true center in early-enrollee freshman Tristen Hoge. Now it’s up to the two-time Idaho state player of the year to earn the opportunity to replace Nick Martin at the heart of the Irish offensive line.

On paper, Hoge looks like an ideal fit. But after the Irish all but manufactured their last two centers, moving guards and tackles to the center spot, he’ll face challengers like Sam Mustipher—and maybe others like Mark Harrell, Colin McGovern and Hunter Bivin—when a vacancy opens in 2016.

Let’s take a closer look at one of Harry Hiestand’s newest linemen.

 

TRISTEN HOGE
6’4.5″, 281 lbs.
Freshman, No. 66, Center

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

First-team Parade All-American. U.S. Army All-American. State Player of the Year for Idaho. 247Sports’ No. 1 center in the country.

Hoge turned down offers from Boise State, Cal, Florida, LSU, Stanford, UCLA and many others to commit to the Irish more than a full calendar year before Signing Day.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

It’s tough to find a recruit that has a more straight-forward profile than Hoge. A four-year starter as a center with a 47-game playing streak and the only two-time Gatorade State Player of the Year in Idaho football history, Hoge should be considering the front-runner to take over the center position after Nick Martin heads to the NFL.

But for as obvious as that natural progression looks on paper, there’s a certain caveat that should come with making that automatic assumption. Rarely does a high school team keep their best offensive lineman at center. And the fact that Hoge managed to be the state’s most decorated player, all while playing a position that’s usually where high school teams hide their undersized or less-skilled linemen, well—it leaves some doubt in the equation until we actually see Hoge work at the college level.

A viewing of high school tape goes a long way towards eliminating those limitation worries. But Hoge had some struggles at the Army game in San Antonio, again understandable after making the jump from the Idaho prep scene to dealing with some of the nation’s toughest interior linemen. So before we annoint Hoge as the next center, let’s see how he progresses under Hiestand and strength coach Paul Longo.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

Hoge isn’t playing in 2015. Not unless something goes terribly wrong. So anything written or assumed about Hoge’s future at Notre Dame won’t need to be decided until after he’s established himself in the system, giving the coaches a very good look at his capabilities to take over the center job as a first-year contributor.

Right now, that seems like the most likely scenario, especially after seeing Sam Mustipher struggle with the consistency of his snaps. But in a depth chart that’s as competitive as the one that currently exists in South Bend, nobody is handed a job. And next spring is critical for Hoge, a 15-practice try-out for a starting job that many assume is his if he’s capable of taking it.

Hoge is in perfect position to take over come 2016, but he’ll have to earn it.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB
Tarean Folston, RB
Will Fuller, WR
Jarrett Grace, LB
Jalen Guyton, WR
Mark Harrell, OL
Jay Hayes, DL
Mike Heuerman, TE
Kolin Hill, DE

Offseason Q&A: Pitt

Pat Narduzzi
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Another season, another head coach for the Pitt Panthers. In what seems like a revolving door atop the Panthers program since Dave Wannstedt was shown the door from his alma mater, Pitt has tapped former Michigan State defensive coordinator Pat Narduzzi to run the show, one of the best hires of the offseason.

For Pitt fans, the fit is a perfect one, with Narduzzi’s aggressive, in-your-face defense and refreshing energy a perfect counterpoint for Chryst. And Narduzzi also inherits a team that’s among the most talented on Notre Dame’s schedule, adding another intriguing element to a game that very quietly is one of the most difficult on Notre Dame’s schedule.

Getting us up to speed on the Panthers is our friend Anson Whaley of Cardiac Hill. He was kind enough to answer some questions as we look at November’s first Saturday, when the Irish travel to the Steel City.

Hope you enjoy.

 

Another year, another move at head coach. But in Michigan State defensive coordinator Pat Narduzzi, it looks like Pitt hired the best candidate on the market, and someone who feels pitch perfect for the program.

Are we still in the honeymoon period? What’s been your early reaction to Narduzzi, the staff he’s built and his first spring?

Definitely still in the honeymoon period and that will probably last for at least the entire first year, to be honest. Pitt fans have been starved for a guy like Narduzzi to come along for quite some time and I expect that even if the team stumbles this season, that he will still have a lot of fans behind him. The early reaction to him has been overwhelmingly positive. A few people will tell you that it’s even been too positive since it seems like he’s being anointed as the team’s savior without having coached a single game. Overall, though, he’s done a lot of things right.

His first big test came with the hiring of assistants and nearly all had not only prior experience in the same position in which they were hired, but many were viewed as good recruiters and had been in big programs in some capacity. It’s also early in the recruiting season, but Narduzzi has won fans over with his aggressive style. He and his staff are all over Twitter and really seem to ‘get’ the whole recruiting thing. That’s a far cry from the last head coach, Paul Chryst, who not only seemed to want to distance himself from the recruiting game, but also lacked a staff of dynamic assistants.

Pitt’s class has started off pretty slowly thus far, but Narduzzi and his staff are displaying a go-getter mentality that’s been refreshing. One thing I keep coming back to is that Narduzzi has openly admitted to enjoying the recruiting process – I’m not sure Chryst ever felt that way and while he certainly did some good things (such as building up a very weak offensive line), you just don’t get the sense that recruiting is his thing.

Narduzzi also brought back the spring game, which Chryst didn’t even bother with last year. Chryst’s mentality was essentially that it’s more important to get an extra practice in, but so much of spring games is simply the opportunity to market your program. Some schools might not particularly need that, but Pitt is starved for any publicity it can get in an area dominated by the Steelers, Pirates, and Penguins. To not hold the game and give your program a chance to sell tickets, push the football program, etc., was a mistake. Pitt held the event in a small venue this year and while the attendance wasn’t huge, there was a noticeable buzz from the fans afterward.

Narduzzi’s personality has also won him some praise. He is making the rounds at Pitt alumni events throughout the state and reports at every stop have been overwhelmingly positive. Fans have been quick to point out that he comes off as sincere and enthusiastic. Former head coach Todd Graham came off as having a dynamic personality, but there wasn’t the talk of him coming off as a sincere guy. Chryst came off as having the sincerity and down-to-earth personality, but lacking Graham’s attitude. Narduzzi seems to be the perfect mix of both and is winning a lot of people over with that style.

The true test won’t come until later but so far, Narduzzi has made quite the impression.

 

There’s some star power taking the field in the dynamic duo of James Connor and Tyler Boyd. The juniors are All-American caliber players and will certainly be a handful for any opponent.

How good are these two? (Leaving the recent news about Boyd’s legal troubles out of it for now…)

Point blank, both are among the best at their positions. Conner received a lot of Heisman discussion early last year and Boyd still managed to have a big season after a slow first half. Conner, of course, took the world by storm on his way to a monster season, but Boyd’s year shouldn’t be downplayed considering how small of a role he had in the offense early on. He was held to only one 100-yard game in his first seven contests before averaging 127 yards per game over his last five. If Pitt had any semblance of a passing game the first half of the season, Boyd would have had an even bigger season.

Both are All-American candidates for 2015 and it would be a surprise if either came back after this season. Boyd is routinely mentioned as a first-round draft pick and while running backs are devalued in this day and age, Conner should still be picked near the top of his position. Conner, in particular, is really going to benefit by leaving early since his bruising style of running limits his shelf life even more than the typical back.

 

One of the bigger off-field stories in the last few weeks was Tyler Boyd’s arrest for DUI. How big of a deal is this? And what’s it say when one of the program’s most high profile players gets arrested for making a really boneheaded decision?

The stance from several readers on our website was that it wasn’t a big deal. The problem for me was, as you said, he is one of the team’s leaders. While it could have been worse, several bad decisions were made by Tyler. Underage drinking happens on every campus, so the idea that this is some unforgivable crime would be foolish. But to get behind a wheel after you’ve had even a few drinks at approximately 2:30 in the morning, as the reports suggest, just isn’t a great idea. To do it when you’re seen as a team leader is, frankly, even worse.

It’s not the biggest deal in the world but certainly a noteworthy incident that warrants some sort of suspension. And when you consider that under Dave Wannstedt and Paul Chryst, Pitt had a string of embarrassing off-field events, it’s not the kind of publicity the program wants. It took some steam out of a lot of momentum that had been building since Narduzzi’s hire.

 

Notre Dame fans have seen these mistakes punished in different ways. Draconian season-long suspensions. And seemingly progressive changes, like we saw when Michael Floyd returned after being suspended all spring to play his senior season.

What do you expect Boyd’s punishment to be, especially with Narduzzi’s first accountability test as the team’s head coach? And how important do you think the head coach’s handling of this situation will be to his tenure at Pitt?

The general consensus seems to be that it’s a one-game suspension sort of deal, and I’d be fine with that. But with a new head coach, we don’t really have any idea how Narduzzi will handle this. Does he make it a longer suspension to set an example? Does he not suspend him at all and simply make him work harder in practice since Boyd is so valuable? Since Narduzzi is a new coach, we’re kind of in uncharted territory here.

I would be very surprised if it were a long suspension. What he did wasn’t smart, but most reports seem to indicate that he was pretty aware at the time of being pulled over. Also, by giving Boyd a harsh penalty, you leave less wiggle room for bigger penalties for bigger crimes. Drinking and driving is not a minor issue by any stretch of the imagination, but assuming Boyd had little to drink that night, players have done far worse and received lesser suspensions. All of that said, it’s difficult to speculate too much since we’re still waiting on more details.

Whatever the punishment, Narduzzi’s handling of it is extremely important on a couple of fronts. It not only sets the tone in what we can expect from him in terms of being a disciplinarian, but establishes some sort of benchmark for the future for similar incidents.

(Editor’s note: In the time between this Q&A and it’s publication, Narduzzi addressed Boyd’s punishment, though didn’t declare whether Boyd would sit out any games.)

 

Offensively, Paul Chryst seems to have left the cupboard full for new offensive coordinator Jim Chaney, who just came from coaching with Bret Bielema — about as good as you can do from continuity purposes.

Chad Voytik returns after a good season. There’s a star at WR and RB, and J.P. Holtz feels like he’s been playing at Pitt since Dave Wannstedt was coaching. Throw in a really experienced offensive line and it sure feels like this could be a terrifying offense to face. Am I crazy?

Not at all. In fact, I think many Pitt fans would be disappointed if the offense wasn’t terrifying. There’s really no reason for that group to not put up a lot of points.

There are some questions to be sure. The offensive line lost their best player in tackle T.J. Clemmings (widely projected as a first-round draft pick until an injury issue popped up) and another starter in Matt Rotheram. The team is also trying to determine who will start opposite Boyd at wide receiver – after Boyd, the leading returning wide receiver is Dontez Ford, who had only three catches last year. If you take the unit as a whole, however, there’s good reason for optimism. Voytik has a year under his belt after being a first-time starter, the offensive line has some quality depth, and there’s real talent at the skill positions. Barring injuries, the offense has a chance to be special.

 

The defense has had to retool, but it brings in the country’s finest defensive mind as a head coach and a Broyles Award finalist as defensive coordinator in Josh Conklin.

What type of style change will Narduzzi and Conklin bring to the Pitt defense? And how did the transition go this spring?

Mostly, I would look for the unit to be more aggressive. One example of that is that Pitt often had its secondary play more off of receivers and I think we’ll see the corners get to be a little more physical at the line. But the bottom line is that Narduzzi and company know that unit has a long way to go.

This is really one of those situations where the players will need to be coached up as there’s not a lot of clear, identifiable talent on defense. The unit had next to no pressure last year from the defensive line after the departure of Aaron Donald. The top two linebackers and 2/3 of the starting linebacking corps, Todd Thomas and Anthony Gonzalez, have both graduated. The secondary was questionable for much of the season and while they get a boost with top recruit Jordan Whitehead at cornerback, there are still many questions surrounding that group that was torched repeatedly on long pass plays.

Reports out of the spring were reasonably favorable but it’s also worth pointing out that the defense will look considerably different in the fall. Pitt adds Whitehead, the true freshman, who wasn’t yet with the team in the spring but could potentially start at corner. The Panthers will add Mark Scarpinato, a defensive lineman transfer from Michigan State. There are also several position battles that will take place and things are far from firm. The transition got underway in the spring but is going to continue right up until the start of the regular season. I’d even expect changes once the games begin since that will be the first time the coaches get to evaluate those guys in actual games from the sidelines.

 

Favorable schedule, 15 returning starters, and the energy that comes with a first-year coaching staff. On paper, you could argue this is the most exciting time in Pitt football since… when, exactly? 2008-2009?

That 2009 team approached the top ten and was having a tremendous season that was eventually derailed by the disappointing 45-44 loss to Cincinnati in the unofficial Big East title game. That was the last time a Pitt team had this kind of optimism that I can remember.

In terms of actual buzz, there’s a lot of excitement around this team. There was certainly some enthusiasm after the hirings of Todd Graham and Paul Chryst, but even that was tempered because of the drastic changes in style on offense each time. Narduzzi not only has some talent to work with, but is also keeping the offensive system pretty similar to what was already in place.

Fans would probably feel a little better if Narduzzi had a year of experience heading into this one but things line up pretty well for the Panthers in 2015 to, if nothing else, break their string of four consecutive 6-6 regular seasons.

Irish A-to-Z: Kolin Hill

Stanford v Notre Dame
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Freshman Kolin Hill had quite a debut for the Irish, making a major impact against Michigan in the season’s second game as a designated pass rusher. The outside linebacker essentially served as a defensive end, wreaking havoc off the edge against the Wolverines, helping to send away the Michigan rivalry with a 1.5 sack day that included two total tackles for loss.

It was the high point of Hill’s first season in South Bend, who basically served as the poster child for Brian VanGorder’s sub-package heavy defensive scheme. And while he disappeared down the stretch, Hill’s unique ability—getting after the quarterback–should serve him well in 2015 and beyond.

 

KOLIN HILL
6’1.5″, 230 lbs.
Sophomore, No. 43, LB

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

An under the radar prospect until his senior season, Hill entertained mostly regional offers until Texas came calling late in the process—after he had committed to Notre Dame. Hill committed to the Irish in December after visiting Colorado, while his twin brother went to Boise State, one of the final recruiting wins for Kerry Cooks.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2014): Played in nine of Notre Dame’s 13 games, notching four tackles on the season, three coming against Michigan. Did not see action against Rice, Florida State, Arizona State or Northwestern.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

It looks like I was on to something when I called Hill the ideal candidate to be a situational pass rusher. Now we just need to see why the quick start against Michigan turned into nothing more than one big game.

If you were a betting man, Hill seems like a perfect redshirt candidate. But if there’s one type of player that can get on the field quickly for Kelly, it’s a situational pass rusher. With Brian VanGorder’s defense hoping Ishaq Williams and Romeo Okwara can provide the heat off the edge, Hill’s explosiveness could be enough to get him some snaps at defensive end or rush linebacker and just let him loose with one thing on his mind: Getting the quarterback.

Recruits like Hill are intriguing because they show how different players fit different schemes and profiles. Never a guy that would’ve fit in Bob Diaco’s scheme, if Hill comes in and has an impressive career in South Bend, it’ll be a reminder that playmakers come in all shapes and sizes.

When the Irish defense was dominant under Diaco, the size and strength of the front seven could’ve served as an indictment on the speed and athleticism that defines Hill’s profile. But if the Irish defense succeeds with smaller, more athletic players on the edges, it’s not necessarily a black mark on Diaco, but rather an impressive feat by Kelly, a head coach with the ability to play stellar defense in two very different styles.

All that being said, it’s not a black or white issue. Give Hill a few years in a college weight room and he’s Prince Shembo, a four-year contributor in the Irish’s 3-4 defense. Shembo profiled similarly to Darius Fleming, the first Cat linebacker in Kelly’s defense.

The bottom line for Hill is that his talent will take him where he needs to go. And on a roster in need of pass rushers, if he’s got enough of it, this staff will find a job for him.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Finding playing time in Notre Dame’s linebacking depth chart doesn’t look so simple until Jaylon Smith, Joe Schmidt and Jarrett Grace depart. And even then, Brian VanGorder has quickly restocked the position, with an impressive freshman class coming in right behind Hill.

Right now, the future for Hill still seems to be as a pass rusher, and Notre Dame isn’t exactly flush with weakside pass rushers. So while Hill’s sub-6’2″ height and marginal size don’t scream defensive end, the lack of established options to rush the passer at least guarantee Hill the chance to be a third-down weapon.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

On Signing Day in February, Brian Kelly singled out Bo Wallace as the best pass rusher of the recruiting class. Wallace never ended up coming to South Bend, meaning there’s nobody walking through the door to answer the Irish’s need to find someone who can get after the passer.

That’s where Hill comes in. Without an every down defensive end who can dominate on third down, it’ll be a group approach to chasing down quarterbacks. That might include Jaylon Smith, whose value also comes with his ability to shutdown everybody but the nation’s most elusive wide receivers. But it should also include Hill, who’ll have another year of knowledge in an NFL system that likely limited his effectiveness in 2014.

The jury is still out when it comes to deciding if Hill has three-down talent to play in this system. But in passing situations, Hill might be Notre Dame’s best option to chase down a quarterback, a role he’ll gladly service as a sophomore.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB
Tarean Folston, RB
Will Fuller, WR
Jarrett Grace, LB
Jalen Guyton, WR
Mark Harrell, OL
Jay Hayes, DL
Mike Heuerman, TE

 

Irish A-to-Z: Mike Heuerman

Heuerman
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When Notre Dame recruited Mike Heuerman, they were chasing a tight end unlike any other on their roster. Undersized but highly-touted, Heuerman didn’t look like Kyle Rudolph, Tyler Eifert or Ben Koyack, but he certainly came with a similar recruiting pedigree.

Fast-forward to his third year in the program and the Irish are still waiting for Heuerman to break loose. Still undersized and not looking capable of adding weight to a shorter-than-ideal frame for a tight end, Heuerman looks and feels like an H-back in an offense that doesn’t feature one.

With a young depth chart that seems to be passing him by, let’s take a look at where Heuerman stands in the Irish offense.

 

MIKE HEUERMAN
6’3.5″, 225 lbs.
Junior, No. 84, TE

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

Notre Dame out-dueled Ohio State for Heuerman’s signature, noteworthy considering his brother was playing for Urban Meyer at the time. There was a long line of suitors for Heuerman, who counted offers from Alabama, Auburn, Florida State, Michigan, Oregon and others.

There was a lot of projecting when teams looked at Heuerman, who did most of his work as a defensive end as a senior. His high school switched to a Wing-T system, limiting Heuerman’s ability to do much as a pass catcher.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2013): Did not see action.

Sophomore Season (2014): Underwent hernia surgery prior to the start of the season. Did not see action.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

Heuerman’s injury during camp made it impossible for him to get a jump start on freshman Tyler Luatua and sophomore Durham Smythe. But it’s unclear whether even a healthy Heuerman would’ve found a place in Notre Dame’s offense.

Having just committed a few paragraphs to ways the Irish offense could use Heuerman, I’m still skeptical that we’ll see that many new wrinkles in Kelly and Mike Denbrock’s system. And while I don’t think Heuerman’s lack of prototypical size is going to be a death blow, I still think he’s a work in progress that will need to prove he can block before he gets the opportunity to catch the football.

One place I think Heuerman will help immediately is special teams. With the Irish struggling to cover kicks in 2013, Heuerman is the perfect combination of power and speed that can run down the field and make a tackle.

The depth chart at the position certainly works in Heuerman’s favor… for now. Ben Koyack will most likely have every down duties. Smythe has drawn some rave reviews this summer and Kelly spoke highly of him during bowl prep as well. But before freshmen Tyler Luatua (another undersized blocker) and Nic Weishar (still a string bean) begin competing, Heuerman will have a chance to establish a niche in the offense.

So for a redshirt freshman will four years of competition remaining, 2014 could be an important year.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

It’s not necessarily a good sign when your number gets handed over to a freshman. And Heuerman will be wearing No. 84 moving forward, with freshman slot receiver CJ Sanders donning No. 9.

(Of course, numbers aren’t official until the season—and Sanders isn’t guaranteed that jersey, just ask Cole Luke.)

But finding a place for Heuerman in this offense is difficult, even as it likely undergoes some changes as Mike Denbrock, Mike Sanford and Brian Kelly retool things for Malik Zaire. Spring practice came and went, with Heuerman mostly anonymous. And the tight end depth chart will welcome in Alizé Jones, a stretch tight end who already looks like a supersized Heuerman as an incoming freshman.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

Not playing in his first two seasons isn’t necessarily a death blow, but Heuerman’s inability to gain weight or stay healthy are two major ingredients when you’re trying to project the football future of a tight end. Heuerman is a very good athlete who has hands and an ability to run well. But so does the rest of Scott Booker’s depth chart.

I won’t be the first one to suggest that Notre Dame’s staff should kick the tires on Heuerman the defensive end, a position he was dominant at as a senior in high school. Without too many natural pass rushers on the roster, a 230-pounder coming flying off the edge could be a complimentary part of the Irish defense—something that’s hard to see if Heuerman stays at either tight end or jumbo receiver.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB
Tarean Folston, RB
Will Fuller, WR
Jarrett Grace, LB
Jalen Guyton, WR
Mark Harrell, OL
Jay Hayes, DL

 

 

Mailbag: Part 2 (A-to-Z, Ishaq, CJ and more)

C. J. Prosise
26 Comments

Happy Monday to you all. Hope everybody is enjoying the fireworks at the Old Course, with one of the more interesting leaderboards I can ever remember.

But golf? That’s not why you guys are here. So let’s finish the mailbag before we get back to our regularly scheduled programming.

 

@AndrewWinn: 29 profiles of #NDFB players complete for Irish A-to-Z series 56+ players to go 50 days untill kickoff. Can he do it?!

I’m plowing away. It’s both suicidal and fun—a great way to get yourself familiarized with a roster that has a ton of talent on it… and enflame your carpal tunnel.

But don’t worry, I’ve got a handful of profiles mostly written, so while it looks like I’m only on Jay Hayes, I’m waaaaay ahead — (who am I kidding?). But we’ve got a lot left to do this summer, finishing up the Offseason Q&As and another Top 25 ranking of the roster.

 

ncdomer: When Kelly talked about the academic challenges our players face, he referred to “playing on the road, playing night games, getting home at 4 o’clock in the morning” Missing a whole night of sleep sounds like an athletic challenge for the next week too. Why doesn’t the team spend the night after a late road game?

I wondered that for a while, too. But I’m guessing it’s a matter of cost—both money and time. It’s not an inconsequential number to pay for another night in a top-flight hotel for 70 players, 20 coaches and staff members, and a contingency of school officials as well.

Plus, for anybody who travels from the West Coast back to South Bend, you loose a ton of day in the air, so while you’d probably get to sleep that night in your hotel, you’ve put yourself back to campus much later on Sunday than you’d want.

Now throw in things like treatment, film review, prep for the following week’s game… and you really don’t have the luxury of giving away that night, just so you can sleep for an extra few hours.

 

domer521: Summer school ends July 24. How soon after that will we learn Ishaq Williams fate ?

As Brian Kelly pointed out, this is an NCAA issue now. So I’m putting the window at roughly 48 hours before opening kickoff against Texas. (I wish I was kidding.)

While the details of this situation are still really hard to pin down, Williams is likely dealing with some retroactive GPA issues, especially if there were multiple courses in question. But the fact that Notre Dame is working (and I’m assuming, on Williams’ behalf) with the folks in Indianapolis about a way to get Williams back on the field is at least promising.

I’m hoping it works out for Williams, who I still think has an NFL future, even if he only spends the season on the scout team.

 

twebb2: Hey Keith, can you talk about the special teams at some point, especially kick returns and punt returns? This seems to be one of those lingering problems of the Kelly era (like, “Is this the year Ishaq finally breaks out?” – hah)… do you think we’ll make some progress on special teams this year?

For as evergreen as this question seems, complaining about Notre Dame’s special teams under BK also seems like a rite of preseason camp.

I actually think Notre Dame’s special teams were vastly improved last year, but after the Brindza/holder meltdown, you tend to forget about the nifty returns Greg Bryant had and the much improved work on coverage units that we saw from Scott Booker’s troops.

I know, you didn’t ask about coverage teams or kickers. (And you really didn’t complain, either.) But I expect someone like CJ Sanders to come in and potentially add some electricity to the return game, and it sure feels like CJ Prosise would be a fun guy to see get an opportunity as a kickoff return man.

I was not a big fan of George Atkinson as a kickoff returner. While he had a few home runs, he lost me with the tip-toeing, the fastest way to take a 10.3 100-meter sprinter and turn him into a slow-poke. But I’d be surprised if Amir Carlisle was back returning kicks again this year, and I’d hope that Kelly and Booker would be open to giving a young player like Sanders a shot at impacting a game in the third phase, especially when snaps look tough to earn.

 

irishsoccerfirst: Keith, it appears that we have more depth than at any time in recent memory. Can we use this depth to our advantage on game day or is it more important as an insurance policy in the case of injuries? I remember reading that one of the keys to the Seattle defense is rotating D line by series. Supposedly, the fresh linemen are more likely to get pressure on the QB without placing so much reliance on blitzing.

I don’t think there’s anybody inside the Gug who wants to create depth for an insurance policy. I suspect they agree with you, and hope that Notre Dame is able to play as many bodies as possible, especially up front on defense. While there’s been growing grumbling about the Irish staff’s inability to land impact defensive linemen, I’m looking at a front seven that has the most depth we’ve seen in the last 10-15 years.

Now we have to see if that depth is good depth, and if last year’s experience for guys like Jay Hayes, Jacob Matuska, Daniel Cage, Andrew Trumbetti and Grant Blankenship will help in 2015.

I’m not sure we’ll find many similarities between Pete Carroll’s Seahawk defense and the group of guys Notre Dame runs out there. And while depth is helpful for Seattle, so is elite personnel. The Irish have two guys that most think can be elite on the defensive line (Sheldon Day and Jarron Jones). They have a great linebacking corps that can supplement if the pass rush needs it.

But the key to depth is to be able to use it on your own terms. If Notre Dame can do that, it’ll mean Brian VanGorder’s defense looks a lot like the group that started the season, not the one that ended it.

 

smsetnor: Can we just give some love to AJ Pollock? The is an MVP candidate who plays an excellent centerfield and is hitting at a solid clip. I get irritated whenever I see the D-backs sit the guy because he should play every day.

You said it! All-Star game appearance, hitting .300 and filling out the stat sheet. I don’t play fantasy baseball anymore, but those stolen bases and runs scored sure look mighty nice.