Keith Arnold

SOUTH BEND, IN - OCTOBER 29: Durham Smythe #80 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish leaps for a touchdown but would go on to fumble the ball during the game against the Miami Hurricanes at Notre Dame Stadium on October 29, 2016 in South Bend, Indiana. Notre Dame defeated Miami 30-27. (Photo by Michael Hickey/Getty Images)
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The good, the bad, the ugly: Notre Dame vs. Miami

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The celebration was likely cathartic. The night of, less a time to dwell on the negative, but rather let loose after finally—finally—winning a tight game.

Of course, that doesn’t make Sunday morning’s tape session any easier. It doesn’t erase some of the frustrating mistakes that kept Miami in the game early as they were wobbling on the ropes, propped the Canes up with special teams blunders, and very nearly handed them the win until snapping back to reality.

In other words, the win was good. But there was plenty of bad and ugly mixed in there as well.

Let’s get to it.

 

THE GOOD

Jarron Jones. The afternoon Jones put together was nothing short of extraordinary. The fifth-year senior earned his first game ball, and had the most tackles-for-loss of any FBS player in a single game this season. And it wasn’t against a directional school, it was Miami.

Jones was too good to take off the field, playing a season-high 54 snaps, far and away the most he’s played this season. But he was asked to hold the point of attack and do so in a game where Daniel Cage left the field after just 22 plays and went into the team’s concussion protocol.

Jones gave the game ball to his mom. Which is always the right decision.

 

The Defense. Give it up to the rebuilt Irish defense, essentially winning the game for Notre Dame by playing an absolutely dominant first 20-plus minutes and closing the game off with a big-time sack of Brad Kaaya. The Irish dominated at the point of attack with 12 TFLs, the most the Irish have made since 2005. The secondary held up, playing plenty of man coverage and not giving up a single catch of 25 yards or more.

In short, if this is what an on-the-fly staff can do with this crew, there might be some hope that this could be a job that’ll attract a high-level national candidate. Because there’s young talent on this defense. And we’re watching it come together quite nicely.

Kelly applauded the defensive game plan postgame. And no play epitomized the job the rebuilt staff did more than the game’s final snap—when the Irish caught the Miami offensive line with a delayed Nyles Morgan blitz, a sack that ended the game.

 

The Resolve. Could you have blamed the Irish for giving up? Because looking at my Twitter mentions and the general well-being of fans watching this game go backwards in real-time, it was ugly out there. Very ugly, with most of you having given up.

So while we can nitpick about the way the Irish won (I’m not sure this resolve could’ve handled a Miami recovery on Durham Smythe‘s goal line fumble), the Irish were technically due a break, and credit should go to this young team for not packing it in after another week where crisis hit.

Quick Hits: 

Tackling. How much better did this team tackle? Watching Drue Tranquill come up and hit, Nyles Morgan make eight solo stops and the young secondary do their job limiting yards after catches, it was a nice piece of in-season progress for a group that looked woeful early in the season.

DeShone Kizer. He missed some throws—something Kelly almost made light of Saturday night. But he also kept the Irish on schedule, out of long down-and-distances, and did a much better job of converting on third down, 8 of 16 on the day.

After feeling like he was the lone contributor on the offense the past few weeks, the Irish seemed to almost purposely spread it around—10 different players making catches and Josh Adams supplying the game’s defining offensive play. More importantly, Kizer didn’t turn the ball over, a mistake that would’ve been too much to overcome the way the Irish were already giving it away on special teams.

Devin Studstill might not have had his name called once on the NBC broadcast. And you know what? That’s a good thing. The Irish safety play in the run game was critically important, and Studstill was a big part of that.

Julian Love & Donte Vaughn. Just a reminder, those are freshman cornerbacks—and a duo that really didn’t play much until a quarter of the way into the season. But Love and Vaughn held their own out there against a talented Miami receiving corps, with both Love and Vaughn making very nice plays on the football.

Kevin Stepherson & Equanimeous St. BrownTwo young receivers making big plays. St. Brown’s touchdown catch was critical and Stepherson showed why Brian Kelly likes him outside at the X receiver spot.

 

THE BAD

The 27-point run.  When this team goes cold, it goes ice cold. And while they managed to get out of the tailspin before they crashed and burned, these type of swings are just so, so damaging.

Want to know how you let a team back in the game? You take a hot start and you go like this after thre-straight scoring drives:

Punt, FG, Fumble, Punt, Halftime, Punt, Turnover on Downs, Punt, Fumble.

Thirteen possessions. Three to start the game with scores. Two to end the game with scores. And then the nine in the middle. Yuck.

 

Seniors Coming up Short. With the game at pivotal places, three veterans had a chance to do big things. Instead, they did the opposite.

With two receivers for one defensive back, captain Torii Hunter Jr. had to make a block to spring C.J. Sanders on 4th-and-1. Instead, he swung and missed and Sanders was drilled for a loss, a huge momentum swing that had Miami tie the game with a field goal heading into the 4th quarter.

Senior tight end Durham Smythe made the bone-headed decision to extend the ball for the goal line as he leapt for the end zone. Instead, he fumbled away what could’ve been the game until DeShone Kizer bailed him out.

(Smythe took to Twitter in appreciation, a move I respect immensely.)

Lastly, captain Mike McGlinchey made a head-scratching mistake, jumping offsides when the Irish had the ball at the Miami one-yard line with a chance to give the Irish some serious breathing room by punching in a touchdown. Instead, the veteran inexplicably jumped, pushing the Irish back outside the 5-yard line, forcing the Irish to make a special teams play—something they struggled to do most of the day.

All three of these mistakes are things that happen in football games. But they’re mistakes from a young team you expect out of your young players, not three veteran leaders.

Quick Hits: 

The offensive line is still really inconsistent. And a look at the postgame grades from PFF tell you why. McGlinchey had his worst game of the season. On the other side, Bars played his best game since Duke, a big afternoon for the first-year starter in a tough matchup. After Colin McGovern only lasted five plays before going into the concussion protocol, Hunter Bivin struggled badly at right guard—the second really tough game in a row he’s played.

Next to him, Sam Mustipher got his bad snaps out of his system. But he got dominated, according to PFF’s grading. Put it into context: Jarron Jones made Miami center Nick Linder look like a high schooler out there, grading out as a team-worst -4.7. On the other side of the ball, Mustipher had a -4.6.

Troy Pride, there will be days like this. The freshman struggled in coverage and got picked on by Miami’s receiving corps, targeted five times and giving up four catches. Throw in a pass interference call and the muffed punt that hit him and it was a tough day at the office from the freshman.

 

THE UGLY

The special teams. At this point, it’s difficult to ignore. Scott Booker’s special teams are horrendous, and it’s a really horrible mix of bad execution, shoddy fundamentals and back-breaking mistakes.

The Irish have plenty of young players on the field and it’s easy to say mistakes by underclassmen like Pride, Jalen Elliott and C.J. Sanders are part of the maturation process. But after losing the NC State game on a rugby punt call, the Irish almost lost this one because of four crucial mistakes—the muff, getting caught on an onside kick (something Mark Richt acknowledged that they saw on film from previous weeks), another blocked punt and Sanders’ inexplicable gift to the Canes for a go-ahead score.

Booker is a young coach. He’s a good recruiter. He’s got a harder job than usual with the tight end missing Alizé Jones and no other coach able to take over the special teams. Both Mike Elston and Mike Denbrock have experience coaching the unit, but Elston runs the Irish recruiting efforts and Denbrock is the team’s play caller and associate head coach.

Kelly has defended Booker publicly. Then again, he did the same thing before relieving Brian VanGorder of his duties.

Five things we learned: Notre Dame 30, Miami 27

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It’ll likely be relegated to the online supplement of the coffee table book memorializing the historic Notre Dame-Miami rivalry. But that doesn’t take away from the drama in the Irish’s 30-27 victory, a win that had all makings of a nightmarish year-in-review for Brian Kelly’s squad, until a young Irish roster rallied after giving up 27 unanswered points, sealing the win on the game’s final play.

But as Brad Kaaya laid pinned under a stack of bodies as the clock mercifully hit 0:00, the Irish finished off a much-needed victory—especially gratifying after spending the midsection of the game finding new ways to give it away.

These sixty minutes embodied the Irish season. There were moments of brilliance—a quick start and dominating first quarter that had Irish fans thinking back to the 2010 post-bye week jumping of a ranked Utah team.

But then—of course—there were the next 40 minutes, a toxic brew of stalled-out offense, self-inflicted mistakes and special teams implosions, with the Irish giving away a 20-point lead to find themselves trailing 27-20 with under seven minutes remaining after C.J. Sanders gift-wrapped Miami’s go-ahead touchdown, muffing a punt inside his own 5-yard-line, the cherry on top of the Irish special teams implosion.

But even with the collective stomach of the stadium queasy and remote controls tossed around ND Nation, Brian Kelly’s team found itself, scoring the game’s final 10 points to pull out the win.

“No one was surprised,” Kelly said of his team’s late-game resolve. “They were just happy as heck that it’s finally over, that they got through it in a close game, that they found a way to win.”

That the Irish did, earning their third victory of the season and keeping those bowl eligibility alive to fight another week.

Let’s find out what we learned.

 

Jarron Jones was unblockable today. 

Notre Dame’s fifth-year senior earned not just the game ball on Saturday, but probably a few job offers for next year. Because the 330-pounder absolutely dominated the trenches, looking like the Jarron Jones many of us thought would emerge after his coming out party against Florida State two seasons ago.

But Jones has traveled a long road since then, injuries turning him into a shell of his former self. But after the tweak in defensive scheme and a renewed commitment to being a senior leader, the Rochester, New York native supplied what could be used as his NFL Draft sizzle reel on Saturday alone, a one-man wrecking crew as he racked up seven solo tackles and an astounding six tackles-for-loss, dominating Miami center Nick Linder.

“I think that was as good of performance that we’ve had in a while here. Jarron was outstanding. He was awarded the game ball,” Kelly said postgame. “What stands out to me more than anything is that when your senior is playing his best ball, that says a lot about how he feels about coming to work every day, getting better, regardless of the record. I think that’s a real positive for our program and for him individually. He was a beast today.”

You saw that buy-in on Jones’s face postgame after the Stanford loss, an emotional veteran proudly defending his team. From the sideline after the victory, Jones talked about the goal of getting to the postseason, the win a huge first step for the team.

“It lifts us up. It lifts us up in a big way,” Jones told NBC’s Kathryn Tappen. “We’ve got to win out to go to a bowl game, so we’ve got to keep pushing, keep it moving.”

 

DeShone Kizer got a huge monkey off his back. 

Notre Dame’s junior quarterback hasn’t been having much fun lately. Stuck amidst the longest losing streak of his lifetime—at any level–Kizer didn’t hide his relief postgame.

“I feel like this whole stadium is off my shoulders,” Kizer said. “The last couple games in this stadium haven’t gone the way we wanted them to. But to come out and get this done the way we did today was awesome.”

Kizer’s play was a big part. He completed 25 of 38 passes for 263 yards and two touchdowns. He threw no interceptions. He got the ball out in rhythm, making big plays both down the field and also on quick routes, spreading the ball to 10 different receivers on Saturday, with the offensive staff deciding that up-tempo would be the best way to slow down a Miami defense that came into the game as the top team in the country in tackles-for-loss.

“Really, really pleased with some of the play within the play,” Kelly said of Kizer’s game. “For me, my eye is focused on rhythm, timing, getting the ball out of your hand. And I thought it was the best since he’s been here, in getting the ball out of his hand.”

That was necessary, as the Irish offensive line still struggled at the point of attack against the Hurricanes. And while Kizer’s been victimized by his own success (and maybe the echo-chamber that has his name still climbing the rungs of mock draft ladders everywhere), Kelly tried his best to praise the game his quarterback played, while reminding everybody that he’s still a work in progress.

“He’s not flawless yet. So, sorry guys. He’s not flawless yet,” Kelly said. “He’s got some work that he’ll continue to work on, but he was really good today. He did a lot of really good things today.”

 

Notre Dame’s special teams nearly lost this game for the Irish. 

Notre Dame’s special teams continue to be horrendous.

(Pause for emphasis)

Scott Booker’s unit didn’t cover itself in glory on Saturday. Two critical mistakes on punt returns gave Miami the ball back and a go-ahead score. They got out-schemed on an onside kick with freshman Jalen Elliott looking like he forgot the rules of the game. And they got another Tyler Newsome’s punt blocked for good measure, enough mistakes to drive the Irish’s early-game momentum into a brick wall.

The special teams didn’t cost the Irish the football game. And to their credit, they actually executed when it was needed, as Chris Finke broke off a huge 23-yard punt return to start the Irish in Miami territory on the game-clinching drive that ended with Justin Yoon booting a game-winning chip shot with 3o seconds left.

But at this point, Irish fans likely yearn for the days of John “Fair Catch” Goodman back returning kicks, hoping that a no-joy approach will at least kill any chance of disaster. Because Sanders delivered a ton of that, making the worst decision of the evening that resulted in seven points for the other guys and also failing to keep Troy Pride away from a short punt that flipped possession and kept Miami alive.

Kelly tried to keep things positive postgame, understandable because the Irish broke their losing streak. And as Kathryn Tappen reported from observing Kelly’s conversation with Sanders after the punt-touchdown debacle, he didn’t undress the sophomore, but stressed being decisive, something Kelly echoed after the game.

“We have to be more confident. We’ve got really good players who care a lot and have a lot of pride in what they do every single day,” Kelly said. “I just need to reinforce with those guys to be more decisive. They’re coming on the other end of that.”

 

Notre Dame’s defense continues to make gigantic strides in life after Brian VanGorder. 

Brian Kelly has talked about some of the limitations that come with the main objectives of not giving up big plays and simply limiting the points. But at this point, Kelly should look at what the results have been—a completely transformed defense that looks nothing like the unit that was a four-alarm fire under Brian VanGorder.

Saturday, Notre Dame’s defense dominating the trenches. They held the Hurricanes to just 18 net rushing yards and had five sacks and 12 total TFLs on the evening, beating Brad Kaaya to a pulp and slowing down some skill players who looked like very tough matchups for Notre Dame’s three freshman cornerbacks.

After the game, Kelly took a moment to respond to the criticism of his team’s pass rush (“We do sack the quarterback here at Notre Dame”) while also crediting his restructured defensive staff for their game plan.

“We knew, more than anything else in this game, that we had to attack the line of scrimmage,” Kelly explained. “I thought it was an outstanding game plan that our defensive coaches put together, and that was we really needed to be aggressive at the line of scrimmage.”

To do that, the secondary had to hold up in coverage. And they did, with Cole Luke nearly taking an interception to the house and Dante Vaughn and Julian Love making some very big pass break-ups.

With Nyles Morgan cashing in nine tackles and two more sacks of his own, this defense is starting to play like we thought it could before the season started, a frustrating footnote considering the early-season futility we saw under VanGorder.

 

Some fans will write this off as a meaningless victory. But Brian Kelly views it as a building block for the future of his program. 

Don’t tell Kelly—or his team—that this win didn’t matter. So some will (somewhat understandably) scoff at this victory, Kelly views it as a first step towards getting this young roster on track to build the mindset of a champion.

After the game, Notre Dame’s seventh-year head coach talked about what a win does for this team, allowing them to avoid another week of toxicity that’s been difficult for his young team to ignore.

“It just meant that we’re not going to have to go through this again,” Kelly said. “We were all going to have to listen to, ‘Okay, the locker room is falling apart,’ a bunch of baloney, and we’d have to go through all this again.”

This staff believes in the process they’ve laid out. But they also understand that you need to see success if you’re going to keep preaching that the wins will take care of themselves if you just put in the work.

“We were still going to do the same thing. The attitude would have been great. Their preparation would have been great,” Kelly said. “But they were going to have to figure out how to win a football game late, and that meant they had to execute better, they had to play all phases better at the end, and they did.”

Scoring the game’s final 10 points helped. So did some luck—DeShone Kizer miraculously recovering Durham Smythe‘s goal line fumble—averting disaster that would’ve been the third critical mistake made by a senior on the afternoon (Torii Hunter’s olé block on 4th-and-1 joined by Mike McGlinchey’s inexplicable false start).

But a win is a win. And coming back from the brink is something that this young roster needed to badly pull off.

“Now they know how to do that,” Kelly said of the late-game win. “Now there’s a lot more confidence in that room that they believe that they can do it, and if they just pay attention to the little things and are more decisive, they’re going to win.”

Where to watch: Notre Dame vs. Miami

Theo Riddick
AP
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If you’re out and about this afternoon and can’t find time to park on the couch and check out the game, we’ve got you covered. As we do with all home games, you can watch Notre Dame vs. Miami anywhere—on your computer, mobile device, or tablet. So either download the award-winning NBC Sports app, or click the following link below.

Coverage begins at 3:00 p.m. ET, with the pregame show also airing on NBC. The game broadcast begins at 3:30, and you’ll be able to stream the halftime bands as well.

With full DVR functionality and an HD broadcast, you’ll have the game at your fingertips.

 

CLICK HERE TO WATCH NOTRE DAME VS. MIAMI

 

Pregame Six Pack: Finding answers

SOUTH BEND, IN - OCTOBER 15: DeShone Kizer #14 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish runs the ball during the game against the Stanford Cardinal at Notre Dame Stadium on October 15, 2016 in South Bend, Indiana. Stanford defeated Notre Dame 17-10. (Photo by Michael Hickey/Getty Images)
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With a week off to step away, the Irish are back with a hefty challenge. Find a third victory and keep bowl eligibility alive with a win against Miami.

On paper, the odds aren’t that long. The Irish actually opened as a favorite this Saturday, though that turned quickly to two-point underdogs. It’s a common move these past few weeks—Vegas believing that Notre Dame will eventually snap out of this funk, though the betting public thinks otherwise. So far, the betting public has been right.

So while most fans look for a silver lining (one that won’t likely be coming until next season), this football team looks for a win. And as Kelly’s young depth chart seeks validation after some hard work and even harder losses, the Hurricanes are coming.

Let’s get to the Pregame Six Pack. Before a 3:30 NBC kickoff at Notre Dame Stadium, let’s look at six potential slump busters for the Irish as they look to break through.

 

COLE LUKE. Notre Dame’s senior cornerback needed a rest. And let’s hope he got it last week because one of Miami’s all-time receiving leaders is coming to town.

Luke may not draw Stacy Coley every snap, but he’s slowly returning to his spot as the playmaker in Notre Dame’s secondary. Coming off a big game that would’ve been even bigger had an early whistle not taken away a strip-and-score, Luke needs to find a way to make an impact against Brad Kaaya—who will likely be taking dead aim at the freshmen surrounding him.

Since Luke moved inside to the slot, he’s rejuvenated his game. And we saw that against Stanford, his best performance, though in a losing effort. And with Miami likely expecting to complete a high percentage of their throws, Luke needs to capitalize a few times, taking a shot—and cashing it in—when the opportunity presents itself.

 

JOSH ADAMS. Brian Kelly admitted this week what everybody watching Josh Adams was wondering all season. Is the sophomore running back really 100 percent?

No, he’s not—banged up and working through things since fall camp, a variety of soft-tissue issues making it difficult for Adams to display the horsepower and speed he showcased in the most impressive freshmen seasons in school history.

But against Miami’s beat-up defensive front, the Irish need to establish a running game to call off a pass rush that’ll want to pin its ears back and get after DeShone Kizer. And if Adams was able to catch his breath after a week off, he’ll be the best answer for a running game that’s looking for big, explosive plays.

 

TORII HUNTER. What’d you do on your off weekend? Well, Torii Hunter got married. The newlywed now needs to turn these next few weeks into a honeymoon (see what I did there?), five weeks to finish a regular season off strong after he had his year derailed in the season opener against Texas on a dirty hit in the end zone.

One tweak to Hunter’s game is where he’s lining up. The Irish featured Hunter less at the X receiver and more in the slot last week, an idea some blogging idiot around here (the one typing) had been advocating. It’s put Kevin Stepherson in a position to make more plays one-on-one, while putting Hunter into a spot where his skills and savvy can get loose over the middle.

Hunter’s best trait is his versatility, something that Kizer can also utilize. And while the offense had a poor outing against Stanford’s defense, Hunter found some openings, four catches for 70 yards. That’s momentum worth following.

 

SAM MUSTIPHER. After losing his mojo the last few weeks, Mustipher needs to get his shotgun snapping back under control. And just as important, he needs to get his mind off the mechanical first step of his job, because Miami’s Kendrick Norton will be looking to do some damage across from him.

Norton’s had a nice impact as a run defender this season and the Irish have struggled on the interior, with Mustipher, Colin McGovern and Hunter Bivin struggling. McGovern is healthy again, back in the lineup after missing the Stanford game. And for the Irish to keep the ball moving and stay ahead of the chains, they can’t afford any wayward snaps—or blown assignments on the inside—to derail them.

The staff believes Mustipher will pull out of his funk—watching him get right after sailing a safety past Malik Zaire against Stanford. Now he’s got to trigger a ground game that should have opportunities, the Hokies running for over 250 yards last week against Miami.

 

ISAAC ROCHELL. It’s been a quiet season from Rochell, a senior defensive lineman who made his best impact as an iron man last year, but a member of the supporting cast. So while he’s been steady this year, he hasn’t been spectacular, failing to make the leap to leading man that many of us expected this season. That’s not to say that Rochell has been bad, he’s excelled at times, and he was mostly anonymous against Stanford.

There’s an opportunity to change that. Miami’s offensive tackle depth chart is ravaged, with Sunny Odogwu out and Tyree St. Louis struggling mightily. Virginia Tech sacked the quarterback a ridiculous eight times last week—more than the Irish have on the season.

With the Notre Dame defense likely leaving defenders in coverage to slow down Kaaya and the passing game, it’ll be up to the defensive line to generate some pass rush. And while it’s not a trait that stands out for him, Rochell has a chance to win his one-on-one matchups, something he’s more than capable of doing.

 

DESHONE KIZER. Notre Dame’s chances to win or lose still likely ride on Kizer’s shoulders. After a tough couple of weeks and a poor performance against Stanford, expect Kizer to rally—and the Irish coaching staff to help him as they tailor a game plan that’ll play to his strengths.

That could mean added emphasis on getting the ground game going, knowing that Kizer is deadly working as a play-action passer. It’ll likely also include having protection shored up against Miami’s blitz, with Stanford’s pressure getting to Kizer.

Kizer’s second season as a starter has gone the way many go at this stage. Moments of greatness mixed in with a handful of struggles. So while many of us thought early in the year that Kizer was ready for the next level and the challenge of Sundays, this is a growth curve, hardly the straight line you’d sometimes predict.

So with a wounded Miami team in the middle of a three-game slide, it’s time for Kizer to see his opening. And a struggling Irish team that demands efficient and opportunistic play needs its best playmaker to get the job done.

 

Kelly thinks simplicity might aid offensive production

Notre Dame quarterback Kizer DeShone makes a throw during the Blue-Gold spring NCAA college football game, Saturday, April 16, 2016, at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Ind. (Michael Caterina/South Bend Tribune via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT
South Bend Tribune via AP
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Back to the basics. If there’s a refrain we’ve heard—or one that’s made its way through the echo chamber these past few weeks—it’s that Brian Kelly and his coaching staff are drilling down, looking for any way to pull this team out of their slump.

We saw the changes defensively, a gigantic detour away from the scheme and philosophies of Brian VanGorder. And while that’s helped jump-start the defense, the impact of the move may have hit the offense’s productivity.

Kelly talked about some of those aftereffects this week, the changes on one side of the ball leaking over to the other.

“We’re keeping the points down, but we’re limiting possessions,” Kelly explained. “We went from 15 possessions earlier in the season to this past game we had four possessions in the first half. That’s like playing an option team. We’re going to keep the points down, we’re probably not going to get off the field quite as quick as we did earlier in the season.”

Those lack of opportunities have shown up in the box score. Throw away the game played in hurricane conditions and it’s still clear that the Irish offense didn’t capitalize on their chances against Stanford. And whether it was DeShone Kizer’s interceptions, Malik Zaire’s three short-circuited series or a general lack of running game, Kelly is taking a similar approach with his offense that he did with the opposite side of the ball—though not running anybody out of town.

“We have fallen into a similar trap that we were dealing with earlier defensively. We’re probably doing a little too much,” Kelly said. “When you do the things that you practice every single day, it becomes second nature. You can play free, you can play fast.

“I think from an offensive standpoint, we can just be who we are. Let’s practice what we’re good at and let’s be better at execution in this kind of game.”

Do what you do, but do it better. It’s an approach that’s worked under Greg Hudson’s direction, with a defense mastering the bare essentials as they try to stop the bleeding. Offensively, it’s been a long time since we’ve seen this unit struggle. And while pointing in one direction usually takes the focus off of a multi-faceted problem, cutting down the inventory and letting the Irish talent play fast and loose could be a big help for a group that’s still really young.

“I think there’s an understanding now that we have to figure out what we are doing well and put emphasis on that,” Kizer said. “In the first half of the season there were some specific looks that are more successful than others, and we have to put emphasis on those looks.”