Keith Arnold

Purdue v Notre Dame

Irish A-to-Z: Steve Elmer

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At this time last year, Steve Elmer was on track to start at guard for the Irish—staying on the interior of the offensive line when many had projected him to be a tackle. Yet entering fall camp, Brian Kelly and Harry Hiestand pushed Elmer outside to right tackle, hoping the promising youngster could make the transition outside just as smoothly as he had done everything else in his collegiate career.

The move didn’t stick, and Elmer’s learning curve contributed to a slow start up front for the Irish. But after sliding back inside to guard, Elmer put together a solid season, and now enters his junior year having played in 23 games and started 17, incredible experience for a true third-year player.

While he’s not likely to be the left tackle many expected when he arrived in South Bend, he’s on pace to be an excellent offensive lineman—capable of being dominant from day one against Texas.

Let’s take a closer look at Steve Elmer.

 

STEVE ELMER
6’5.5″, 315 lbs.
Junior, No. 79, RG

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A blue-chipper, Elmer’s only sin in the recruiting world was a super early commitment to Notre Dame, and an unwillingness to waver on that pledge. Elmer started as an elite, 5-star-level prospect. Some challenges on the summer circuit dropped that ranking, but after dominating at the U.S. Army All-American Bowl, his stock moved back up.

Elmer was chased by Michigan to no avail and likely would’ve fielded offers from just about any program in the country if he wanted them. He received the Anthony Munoz Award as the top prep lineman in the country.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2013): Played in 10 games, starting four after Christian Lombard’s season ended with back surgery. Shared time with Conor Hanratty at guard.

Sophomore Season (2014): Started all 13 games for the Irish, one of just eight players on the team to start every game. Played the first three games of the season at right tackle.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

I wrote this not knowing that Notre Dame’s staff would reshuffle their offensive line, pushing Elmer into the right tackle job he never fully got comfortable playing.

While I don’t think he played up to the level we maybe expected, another year at guard will give the cerebral Elmer time to hone his craft.

There are few linemen I like more than Elmer, a solid kid who is showing quite a bit of maturity by sliding inside to guard and taking one for the team. In the end, if he’s as good as we all tend to think, it could end up helping. A Swiss-Army lineman could do similar things in the eyes of NFL scouts as Zack Martin — and Elmer doesn’t have “size” issues that plagued Martin.

Putting him in Martin’s class is a bit premature. At least until we see him dominate like Martin did from the moment he hit the field. But Elmer didn’t get the benefit of redshirting like Martin did, so he has some work to do before he wins multiple lineman of the year awards at Notre Dame.

Ultimately, Elmer, Stanley and McGlinchey have the opportunity to do something very special and form a nucleus that will elevate the Irish offensive line to heights we haven’t seen.

(And no, I’m not talking about the trio being tall.)

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

There’s an NFL lineman in Elmer, and these next two seasons will determine whether he’s an early-round pick or a guy that goes on day three. The “stigma” that comes with being a guard is long gone in NFL circles, so the worry that getting shoved inside ruins Elmer’s value at the next level went up in smoke when guards started becoming Top 10 picks and Zack Martin played a near-perfect college career at left tackle and then became an All-Pro rookie at guard.

Comparing Elmer to Martin helps nobody. Elmer needs to continue to improve his feet and his technique, and to tighten up his misses. When the rising junior looked bad last season he looked really bad—some blown blocks turning into olé! situations.

But Elmer has everything you want in a lineman. A great frame, good length, size and power. Not to mention a good head on his shoulders. The future is bright.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I fully expect Elmer to be a critical part in the best Irish offensive line since the Holtz era. With another season at guard and growing chemistry between Nick Martin and Mike McGlinchey, Elmer’s entering his third season as a major contributor, and it’s time for dominance to take hold.

Being a piece of the puzzle and one of the dominant performers are two very different things. As an upperclassman and a multi-year starter, Elmer needs to look at himself as one of the three elite performers up front, unwilling to let Martin and future first-rounder Ronnie Stanley carry the weight.

This will be Elmer’s offensive line in 2016. But laying that groundwork begins now.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL

Irish A-to-Z: Micah Dew-Treadway

247Sports.com
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Early enrollee freshman Micah Dew-Treadway jump-started his college football career this spring, joining classmates Tristen Hoge, Te’von Coney and Jerry Tillery learning about life at the next level. The Chicagoland product, with projectable size and length, will now go about transitioning from high school standout to freshman defensive lineman—quite a fall down the totem pole.

In Dew-Treadway, the Irish coaching staff identified a projectable defensive lineman. He’s a raw athlete who looks the part of a defensive tackle, though they hope he turns into someone with pass rush ability as well. That could take some time, especially along a defensive line filled with talent. But for as quickly as someone like Jerry Tillery emerges, there are developmental talents that end up in the same place.

Let’s take a closer look at the early enrollee.

 

MICAH DEW-TREADWAY
6’4″, 295 lbs.
Freshman, No. 97, DL

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A Semper-Fi All-American, Dew-Treadway picked Notre Dame in June and stuck with his commitment. A three-star prospect, he notched eight sacks and 12 TFLs as a senior, earning All-State first-team by the Champaign News-Gazette and All-Area by the Chicago Sun Times.

Had offers from Mississippi State, Kentucky, Maryland, Virginia, Wisconsin and others.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

When looking at the 2015 recruiting class, Dew-Treadway probably embodies the “developmental prospect” tag better than just about anybody else. There are things that he possesses that you just can’t teach—namely being 6-4 and weighing 295 pounds. But after that? New defensive line coach Keith Gilmore has a lot of work to do.

The good news? There’s no reason that Dew-Treadway should feel the pressure of needing to see the field immediately. But on Signing Day, Brian Kelly talked about the ability they see in the young defensive lineman to rush the passer, and ultimately that could be a differentiator for the tackle prospect.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

Barring a nightmare scenario, I don’t see Dew-Treadway on the field this season. And that’s not a bad thing. Watching highlights from his senior season of high school, you saw Dew-Treadway do some very good things, displaying the type of player who could very easily turn into a Jarron Jones type performer. But there are also the habits of a high schooler on display, things that will need to be drilled out of him.

Fifteen practices this spring won’t necessarily do that. Nor will a fall playing behind veterans Sheldon Day and Jones. But as the Irish rollover their interior depth, newcomers will need to step to the forefront. So throw Dew-Treadway into a promising group that’ll include Jay Hayes and Jon Bonner, developmental players who could be key to providing the next level of reinforcements.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB

 

All eyes on The Opening

Rivals.com
40 Comments

Some of college football’s elite prospects are soaking up life in Beaverton, Oregon, hosted by Nike and taking part in The Opening. Never heard of it? It’s the now-annual training combine and 7-on-7 tournament that serves as a mecca to the college football recruiting industry.

(Where else is it acceptable to have team names like “Alpha Pro,” “Fly Rush,” and “Lunar Beast?”)

With the Elite 11 quarterback camp taking place at the same time on Nike’s campus, it’s a very good time to be an elite high school athlete—with Nike swag and recruiting analysts doing their best to woo you as you do your best to look excellent in shorts and Dri-FIT. But it’s also a very good chance to get an apples-to-apples look at some of the top prospects in the country, with SPARQ testing all but taking a hammer to the self-reported 40 times and vertical leaps that come along with the YouTube highlights.

Last year, we saw Notre Dame commit C.J. Sanders stand out during the competition, running a blazing sub-4.4 forty time as he made it to the SPARQ Finals. The Irish have three commitments taking place in the festivities at Nikeville, and the early reports all seem to be positive.

A week after pulling a bus in his commitment music video, Irish commitment Parker Boudreaux is backing up that chutzpah with a nice performance in Oregon. Boudreaux was the top-testing offensive lineman at the camp, running a legit 5.1 forty, while also doing very good things in the strength categories.

At 6’4.5″ and 289 pounds, Boudreaux also silenced the questions about his size and length. And his quickness—his 20-yard shuttle time was the best of any lineman in Oregon and would’ve been the best last year as well—gives Harry Hiestand a nice piece of clay to mold moving forward.

If Boudreaux looked the part of a mauler, offensive tackle commit Tommy Kraemer continues to solidify his reputation as one of the country’s best players. Irish 247 published a glowing review of Kraemer’s first day, and at 6’5.5″ and 308 pounds, it sure looks like Notre Dame landed the tackle they needed to add in this recruiting class.

“I liked Tommy Kraemer a lot,” 247Sports Director of Scouting Barton Simmons said. “He’s enormous and they moved a lot of true tackles to guards because when you have so many elite guys, some of those guys have to kick inside, and Kraemer has been one of those guys that has stayed on the edge and looked really good with his feet mirroring quick defensive linemen and has the wide-bodied frame, it takes a lot of geography for a defensive lineman to actually get around him. He’s not a guy that lets guys bully him also. I think he had complete day.

The third Notre Dame commitment at The Opening is running back Tony Jones Jr. Checking in at 5’11” and 210 pounds, Jones has the physique you want out of a power runner, and there’s definitely room to put on 15-20 more pounds once he gets to South Bend.

Jones ran in the high 4.6s—about what you’d expect—and looked good catching the football, per multiple reports. With 5-star Ohio State commitment Kareem Walker missing his flight and nursing a tweaked ankle, there wasn’t a chance to measure Jones against the elite of the elite, but only the freakish 258-pound Devin White ran better among the big backs, so the IMG Academy product had a good opening day.

The Irish are in the hunt for several other prospects. Most look at Canadian receiver/freak athlete Chase Claypool as a possibility to be the next commitment in Notre Dame’s 2016 recruiting class.

Claypool will announce his intentions on Friday, but on Wednesday he showed off a unique skill-set that should have Irish fans very excited if he indeed decides to head to South Bend. At 6’5.5″ and 214 pounds, Claypool ran a 4.66, while also vertical leaping 35-inches.

While those numbers could make staying at receiver a possibility, Notre Dame’s looked at Claypool with the potential to play safety. He’s also basically a slightly taller, slightly faster, slightly better built version of last year’s 5-star defensive end Keisean Lucier-South, who the Irish chased but he ended up at UCLA, so the possibilities seem endless. There’s been no better coach at just getting a great athlete to campus and then figuring out what to do with him than Brian Kelly, so if the Irish do reel in Claypool, they’ll be getting a very intriguing gem in their recruiting class.

The Irish are also after a pair of elite linebackers. Once again, Notre Dame is back in Fresno, this time chasing after 5-star prospect Caleb Kelly. While most only remember the ones that got away (Deontay Greenberry, Tee Shepard, Michiah Quick), credit Kelly for acknowledging the past and also saying it won’t effect his decision.

“Fresno isn’t some blackhole,” Kelly told Blue & Gold’s Andrew Ivins. “It has just been that everybody has been close. Everybody in Fresno has liked Notre Dame, I mean Tee Shepard he had a chance to go there, and Michiah Quick he was choosing between Notre Dame and Oklahoma, so I mean Notre Dame has been it, but we just haven’t ended up there.”

At 6’4″ and 219 pounds, Kelly has the length and size you want in a linebacker. While he didn’t run the 40, he tested well in other drills and seemed to reinforce his 5-star ranking. He’s trying to get to campus later this month and will also use an official visit to get a look at Notre Dame.

 

Lastly, Houston linebacker Jeffrey McColloch opened some eyes when he made the SPARQ testing finals. With a 38-inch vertical and a 4.0 agility time, the 4-star linebacker showed some serious explosiveness along with a 230-pound frame. He also revealed that head coach Brian Kelly has taken on some of the recruiting duties with him.

“I talk to the head coach pretty much every day,” McCulloch told Rivals.

He’ll also make a trip to South Bend later this month, family in tow.

 

 

Irish A-to-Z: Michael Deeb

Deeb
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Last spring, Michael Deeb looked like a front runner to emerge in the middle of Notre Dame’s defense. This spring? He was buried behind a group of talented players and experimenting with a position change.

That’s life in Notre Dame’s defense, a reloaded group that relied on young players to fill the holes in 2014 after the starters went down. Deeb looks the part of a prototype middle linebacker, the type of hulking player you want among the first off the bus. But entering his third season in South Bend, he’s yet to find a role on the Irish defense.

With depth up the middle and an a potential injury that needs rehabbing, let’s see where Deeb stands in the middle of his Notre Dame career.

 

MICHAEL DEEB
6’2″, 255 lbs.
Junior, No. 42, MLB/DE

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

Deeb was a three-star recruit, a middle linebacker that the Irish looked at as both a junior, as a on-campus visitor at summer camp before Bob Diaco and Brian Kelly decided to pull the trigger and make an offer.

Deeb had an offer from Florida State, but didn’t have them from Miami or Florida—though he earned MVP honors at Al Golden’s summer camp. Deeb looked the part of a readymade thumper, but questions about his athleticism existed.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2013): Did not see action.

Sophomore Season (2014): Played against USC and LSU. Did not register a tackle, though served as a scout teamer at linebacker.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

It was indeed Nyles Morgan that kept Deeb off the field — with a healthy Joe Schmidt indispensable on the interior. But it was a surprise that Deeb wasn’t a special teams regular in either his freshman or sophomore seasons, though the Irish changed their philosophy on coverage teams to find faster more athletic players.

Kelly has talked about the desire to stay multiple, and a linebacker like Deeb allows the Irish to shift into a 3-4 if the time calls for it. And at 242-pounds, there’s no question he’s hefty enough to stand up at the point of attack, something Joe Schmidt could struggle with an Morgan initially as well.

Ultimately, it’s likely Morgan who will determine how much football Deeb plays on the inside of the Irish defense. They are essentially classmates, with nobody thinking Morgan will need a year of seasoning before hitting the field.

Looking into the crystal ball, it’s hard not to see some of the limitations that Deeb showed as a high schooler not showing up as a collegiate player. Sure, coaches talked about Deeb’s relentless work ethic and willingness to improve in the passing game and in coverage. But it’s hard to see Carlo Calabrese taking a lot of snaps on the interior of a 4-3 defense, and right now Deeb feels a bit like Calabrese as a young player.

All that being said, Deeb looks a bit like a cinderblock in a football uniform. And after watching the Irish special teams bumble their way through the 2013 season, expect to see No. 42 running down the field with reckless abandon on multiple coverage teams for the next four seasons.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

There were whispers that Deeb underwent a significant surgery in May, though that was never confirmed by anyone inside Notre Dame’s program. But either way, I’m not sure Deeb’s potential in the Irish program will be changed.

At this point, it’s hard to see Deeb finding a role in the Irish defense, at least at linebacker. There were whispers that Deeb was going to get some reps at defensive end, a logical place for a guy who is pushing 260 pounds and can move.

(While the Irish don’t employ one, there are also maybe some cross-training opportunities at fullback, though the last time Notre Dame lined up a thumping inside linebacker in the backfield, Carlo Calabrese was chasing a USF safety down the field.)

Deeb’s limitations—a worry in Diaco’s 3-4 scheme—are only amplified in a 4-3 that demands fleet, instinctive linebackers. But with three seasons of eligibility left, there’s a chance Deeb finds a niche in the program.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

Deeb seems to be the type of glue-guy that you want in the program. So if his role this season is serving as the best scout team linebacker in America, he’s likely happy to do that. Right now, Joe Schmidt, Jarrett Grace, Nyles Morgan, Greer Martini and likely Te’von Coney all will factor into the defense before Deeb does. That means Deeb’s going to have to make some significant improvements in his game, and also find another role to play on this defense.

Ultimately, it could be as a in-the-box goalline defender. Or a situational player along the defensive line. Or a great piece of the kick-return wedge. With 85 scholarships, Deeb’s a part of Notre Dame’s plans for two more seasons. Finding a way to contribute should be the goal, whether that be in limited opportunities or not.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL

Dilfer praises Malik Zaire at Elite 11

Malik Zaire, J.R. Tavai
28 Comments

Camp counselor or participant? Those watching Malik Zaire at The Opening were struggling to figure that out.

With some of the nation’s top recruits heading to Nike HQ this week for the Elite 11 quarterback camp and the prep combine The Opening, Zaire returned to his quarterbacking roots to serve as a camp counselor.

It wasn’t too long ago that Zaire was an option quarterback looking to make a name for himself as a camper. He did that—nearly winning the competition, and making quite an impression on Elite 11 head coach and ESPN analyst Trent Dilfer.

Zaire was back working with Dilfer in Oregon, now serving as a counselor. And Irish Illustrated’s Anna Hickey caught up with Dilfer, who sung Zaire’s praises after watching him compete and coach during the first days of camp.

Dilfer wasn’t shy with his words, when talking about the quarterback’s work ethic.

“He’s a machine. He’ll go until he dies,” Dilfer said, before telling Hickey that he’s already spoken with Notre Dame quarterbacks coach and offensive coordinator Mike Sanford about the new starting quarterback.

Zaire’s holding his own as a thrower as well. First-round prospects like Penn State’s Christian Hackenberg and USC’s Cody Kessler at also in Beaverton. And according to Dilfer, Zaire’s capable of throwing the ball with those two pocket passers as well.

Here’s Dilfer when asked by Hickey about his evolution as a passer.

“He’s so much more advanced as a passer. Not that he wasn’t before, but I remember getting him from high school, and everybody was saying he’s just a runner who can throw a little bit. And anyone who’s still saying that, I think it’s crazy. He is going toe-to-toe with (Penn State quarterback) Christian Hackenberg, (USC quarterback) Cody Kessler, with all of these supposed passers, and he’s ripping it around as good as anybody. I think Malik has the curse like a lot of college quarterbacks these days that they’re so dynamic as runners that they get devalued as passers. But I think Malik is an exceptional passer.”

Zaire hasn’t had a chance to establish himself as a college quarterback like the other counselors working. But for those in Oregon watching Zaire give back to the camp that helped establish him as a rising senior in high school, Zaire’s leadership is apparent, as is his comfort level now that he’s ascended to Notre Dame’s starting quarterback.