C. J. Prosise

Can spring stars deliver in the fall?

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Just like spring marks the end of winter, it also begins another unofficial season on the gridiron. The emergence of spring stars. These breakout stars sometimes burn out before fall rolls around, but it doesn’t make their emergence any less interesting.

It may be a linebacker freed by a graduating veteran. Or a lineman who had a monster offseason in the weight room. Perhaps it’s a freshman, more than ready to take off that redshirt.

Every spring, a handful of players emerge. Some turn out to be mirages. Some, like Joe Schmidt last spring, give all the clues they’ll be ready to be frontline players when fall comes around, and when they do it’s all the more fulfilling.

While Notre Dame’s quarterback situation ruled the headlines, there was still plenty of room for some spring stars to emerge. So let’s take a look at three standouts and see where they’ll be come fall camp.

 

C.J. PROSISE

Overview: With only two scholarship running backs on the roster, Prosise spent the spring cross-training in the backfield. What may have started as an emergency provision turned into a legitimate running option, with Prosise using his game-breaking speed and impressive size to throw a wild card into the running back rotation.

Money Quote: “He’s a guy you are going to fear,” Brian Kelly said after the spring game.

Legit or Mirage? This is looking very legit, with both Kelly and associate head coach Mike Denbrock calling Prosise one of the team’s best offensive players. And with Everett Golson’s transfer, adding a versatile piece to a running game that’ll likely now be accentuated, Prosise’s stock is definitely on the rise.

With Malik Zaire getting another option in the zone-read game, either off the edge or from the backfield, the idea of getting Prosise ten touches on the ground—in addition to his potential as a deep threat—has to have Mike Sanford sketching plays like John Nash.

Outlook for the Fall: Full-time starter, part-time running back.

While Amir Carlisle took the majority of reps as slot receiver this spring, it’s difficult to understand taking Prosise off the field, unless he’s going to spend the majority of his time at running back.

But with Tarean Folston and Greg Bryant a more than capable two-deep, keeping Prosise in the slot allows Kelly to get his best 11 on the field, something he’s talked about doing. With Will Fuller on the outside and Prosise in the slot, that could leave some very appealing match-ups, especially for Chris Brown and Corey Robinson.

 

 

JERRY TILLERY

Overview: The early-enrollee freshman looked like a great left tackle prospect. But after deciding to start his career on defense, Tillery was the defensive lineman that stood out this spring the most, taking advantage of Jarron Jones’ recovery from surgery and limited reps by Sheldon Day. With length, size and (maybe even better) athleticism that reminds people of Stephon Tuitt, Tillery was the talk of spring on the defensive side of the ball.

Money Quote: “He’s just a unique player. One that I can’t remember I’ve coached,” Brian Kelly said. “I don’t want to put him in the Hall of Fame yet, but he’s a unique talent.”

Legit or Mirage? Most likely legit, though we may need to temper our expectations for a first-year defensive lineman. Tillery isn’t necessarily a pass rushing threat, though the Irish will use all the help they can get on the edge. But reaching a half-dozen TFLs during his first season would be an incredible debut for Tillery, especially playing on a defensive line that features Jarron Jones and Sheldon Day as senior starters.

Outlook for the fall: First defensive tackle off the bench.

While it was Jay Hayes that was activated last November when he took his redshirt off, I tend to think that Tillery is the first guy off the bench for the Irish defensive front, playing a slightly larger role than Day played in 2012 when he was the third-man in the defensive end rotation, joining Tuitt and Kapron Lewis-Moore.

Tillery’s versatility will be critical, especially as Brian VanGorder mixes and matches up front with multiple looks. The Irish don’t seem to have a true pass-rushing defensive end, so putting Tillery across from Isaac Rochell would allow the Irish to line up four 300-pounders, an imposing front four.

Putting a lot on the shoulders of a first-year defensive lineman is a risky move. But not many early-enrollee freshmen set off for South Africa on three-week classes, choosing to see the world instead of return home for a brief break.

Just about everybody inside the program expects Tillery to become a star. How soon remains to be seen.

Terrence Magee, Max Redfield
Terrence Magee, Max RedfieldAP Photo/Mark Humphrey

 

MAX REDFIELD

Overview: Most thought Redfield’s strong spring last year would lead to a big season. It didn’t, with Redfield spending a large portion in the dog house before being freed when the position became a MASH unit.

A five-star talent as an athlete, Redfield’s jumped between two different systems when Brian VanGorder took over for Bob Diaco, neutralizing his natural talent with a brain that required too much processing. But a strong Bowl Game and a nice spring have Redfield on track for a big junior season, at a position with absolutely zero margin for error in 2015.

Money Quote: “So much different than where we were at any time during the season,” Kelly said, talking about the improvements Redfield and fellow safety Elijah Shumate made.

Legit or Mirage? With Nicky Baratti and Drue Tranquill each coming off of major surgery, there’s nobody at the position to push Redfield. That said, even if there was, it’s Redfield’s third season in the program and it’s time for the former blue-chip prospect to turn into the type of player everybody expected him to be.

Kelly credited a lightbulb going on for Redfield in his preparations for the Music City Bowl. After a strong spring and an entire summer to continue to learn his role on the defense, Redfield should be ready to be a standout.

I’m not buying in totally just yet, but Redfield has all the tools needed.

Outlook for the Fall: Full-time safety and a Top-Five Defender.

If Redfield is playing as well as he can, he’ll have a chance to be one of the Irish’s top five defensive players. That doesn’t sound like resounding praise, until you consider some of the personnel. All-American Jaylon Smith. Team MVP Joe Schmidt. Returning star cornerback KeiVarae Russell. Captain Sheldon Day. Throw in a ball-hawking centerfielder and the Irish defense could be a very, very good unit.

After high-profile academic mistakes, Notre Dame wisely examining new options

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Monday, Notre Dame announced that 16 student-athletes would be spending three weeks in South Africa, earning credits in a new study abroad program examining the cultural, historical and social effects racism has had on South Africa. Five more will be going to Greece, learning about archaeological sites and museums in Ancient Corinth.

Of all the recent headlines garnering attention in the world of major college athletics, press releases like these tend to go straight to the recycling bin. Students-athletes acting like students? Isn’t there a unionization effort to discuss or a pay-for-play plan that gets people excited?

There are many broken parts to the NCAA’s amateurism model. But ignoring some of the virtues that come from a free collegiate experience is just as destructive as avoiding the charade some major college athletic departments have become.

Notre Dame isn’t just sending a slew of walk-ons and benchwarmers to make the university look good. Of the 21 athletes setting sail for far off places, nearly half are football players. Jaylon Smith, Corey Robinson and Jerry Tillery are among the contingency going to South Africa. Max Redfield and Romeo Okwara are going to Greece.

But for as hard as Notre Dame is working to balance a first-rate academic experience with elite collegiate athletics, it’s failures have garnered far more headlines that trips like this. So while the university proudly (and understandably) continues to trumpet its successes, most eyes only focus on the high-profile mistakes that have taken place over the past few years.

Very high profile.

Everett Golson followed up his national-championship debut season with a season-long (fall semester) suspension from the university for an Honor Code violation.

Last season’s basketball hero Jerian Grant was pulled from the floor and school at the semester break after his own mistake.

The hockey team’s top-scoring defenseman, Robbie Russo, was lost for the same amount of time because of his own poor judgment.

And that’s before KeiVarae Russell, DaVaris Daniels, Ishaq Williams and Eilar Hardy were taken down during the two-month investigation that led to lost seasons and multiple-semester suspensions for most of the group.

Some of the school’s most prominent athletes, all caught up in embarrassing academic failures. (You can’t blame journalists from seizing on the opportunity with a misguided take-down column.) But those academic failures were a two-way street, forcing the university to look at the growing divide between the academic profile of student-athletes and the rest of the student body.

“When we recruit student-athletes, we have an obligation to provide them with the resources necessary,” head coach Brian Kelly told Sports Illustrated. “And if we don’t, then we have fallen short. And I think that in these instances, there’s culpability for everyone.”

While the story was a profile on KeiVarae Russell, Pete Thamel’s reporting uncovered some changes taking place at Notre Dame, reacting to the struggles and high-profile mistakes that have been happening all too often. And while there was no official comment out of the university to expand on SI’s reporting, it’s clear that both the athletic department and the university leadership has learned from the mistakes made by both the student-athletes and those struggling to provide the resources for them to succeed both on and off the field.

In Kelly’s conversation with Sports Illustrated, Notre Dame’s head coach pegged the average GPA of his incoming freshman class at 2.8 with a score of 24 on the ACT. Compare that to the freshman class’s average ACT score of 33 (Notre Dame doesn’t track GPA for incoming freshmen, but it’s certainly a full letter grade above a 2.8). It’s not hard to see the great divide.

Adding to that divide is a workload for Notre Dame football players that’s beyond significant. Talking with former and current football players, a routine day was often times 15-hours from alarm clock to pillow, including a full class load, organized study hours, lifting, film study and practice that command far more time than any NCAA 20-hour weekly limit can fully encapsulate.

As Irish fans seethed throughout the two-month investigation and lengthy appeals process that ate up much of the 2014 season, Notre Dame’s administration took an honest look at their role in this dilemma. And it appears that they took dead aim at fixing some of the problems facing student-athletes, especially those coming from “at-risk” academic profiles.

From Sports Illustrated:

In the spring of 2014, Swarbrick co-chaired a 17-member task force created to examine effective ways to support “at-risk student-athletes.” The takeaways proved more evolutionary than revolutionary, focusing on intensive individualized attention, a stronger summer bridge program, expansion of a writing and rhetoric tutorial, and faculty mentors. Faculty athletic representative Patricia Bellia, a law professor who was the task force’s other chair, says the process made the school realize it needs to take a “case management” approach to each student, with information pooled from trainers, assistant coaches, nutritionists and anyone close to them. “We’ve determined they can succeed [by admitting them],” she said. “How can we make that happen on an individual level? What kind of support and resources does that individual need?”

For all the talk of Kelly’s frustration with the process last fall, the reality sounds to be quite the opposite. Working alongside athletic director Jack Swarbrick and university president Rev. John Jenkins, Kelly talked about the “transformative conversations” that took place, a mind-blowing concept for those who remember the Notre Dame ruled by Monk Malloy and former admissions director Dan Saracino.

“We’ve done so many things here to put Notre Dame back in a position to compete nationally, and I kind of look at this as that last piece in making sure we’re taking care of our student-athletes,” Kelly told SI. “It strengthened my resolve in, We’re going to get this right.”

What that entails remains to be seen. The worry of diluting a Notre Dame degree is a real one. And there’s no desire to create a “general studies” major like the one at Michigan that Jim Harbaugh so famously torched while he was Stanford’s head coach.

When asked for expanded clarity on the university’s task force, a spokesman for the football program preferred to let the article speak for itself.

But 15 years ago, Notre Dame was insulting student-athletes—elite players like T.J. Duckett and future Heisman Trophy winner Carson Palmer, who was ready to commit to Notre Dame on the spot. Now they’re trying to find a way to balance the challenges of the academic course work with the rigors of playing major college football.

That’s quite a change. And one for the better.

“Are there other ways to do it?” Kelly asks. “Can we cut back on credit hours? Instead of taking 15 [the current practice to start a semester], can we take 12 and make it up in the summer? Are there other course offerings that could come about and be offered in lieu of a specific class? Those are conversations that had never taken place.”

 

Kelly comments on Golson’s transfer

Brian Kelly, Everett Golson
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If you were looking for anything official out of Notre Dame after Everett Golson announced his intention to play next season at Florida State, think again. But yesterday, Brian Kelly was the head speaker at the ninth annual West Michigan Sports Commission Luncheon in Grand Rapids, and he shared a few comments about the move.

As you might have expected, Kelly gave the same classy statement as he did when Golson announced his intentions.

Per MLive.com’s Peter Wallner, Kelly wished Golson nothing but luck, and proclaiming “great admiration” for his former quarterback.

“He wanted a fresh start and Florida State is going to give him that opportunity and I wish him great success,” Kelly said at the WMSC luncheon. “I just hope they don’t see us later down the road at the national championship game. I won’t wish him success that day.”

While the timing of Golson’s final decision is up for debate, Kelly and the coaching staff honored Golson’s request of not being made available to the media during spring practice, an oddity considering the decision at hand.

But Kelly talked about the chaotic nature of Golson’s spring semester, giving us a look into his mindset the past few months.

“We had about three and a half weeks left in the semester and he’s focused on graduating,” Kelly said, per the MLive.com report. “And we practice in the morning and we have about two hours to get out there and practice and sometimes we look and think he’s got all this time to think about it, and he really doesn’t. He just reacts. He goes out like a football player and practices and then goes to class.”

As you’d expect, Kelly was very optimistic about Malik Zaire’s abilities to run the Irish offense. He also complimented Zaire’s competitiveness, which brought the best out in Notre Dame’s young quarterback, who certainly didn’t shy from the challenge of playing.

So while we’ll never get a chance to see how the Irish offense would’ve functioned with two high-end quarterbacks behind center, Kelly acknowledged that earning his diploma allows Golson the freedom to finish his eligibility elsewhere.

“You’re allowed those opportunities to start anew and I think he felt like he wanted to start anew … and we wish him the best.”

 

 

Everett Golson transferring to Florida State

Everett Golson
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After graduating from Notre Dame over the weekend, Everett Golson has decided to play out his eligibility at Florida State. The former Irish quarterback visited Tallahassee last week before coming to a decision on Tuesday morning, according to Fox Sports’ Bruce Feldman.

Golson released the following statement to Fox Sports:

“This past weekend has been a defining moment in my life as I am proud to say I am a graduate of the University of Notre Dame. The support I’ve received there over the past four years has helped strengthen my integrity, wisdom and character. I would like to thank all of the coaches who spent time speaking with me these past few weeks and considered adding me to their football programs. Their interest and sincerity was truly humbling. After much thought and careful consideration, I will utilize my fifth year of eligibility to join the Florida State University Seminoles. To coach Jimbo Fisher, the Florida State football team, staff, alumni and fans, thank you for allowing me to become part of the Seminoles family. I can’t wait to get started.”

Golson will compete to replace Heisman Trophy winning quarterback and No. 1 overall draft pick Jameis Winston. Current junior Sean Maguire, who started for the Seminoles during Winston’s one-game suspension at Clemson, was the presumptive starter leaving spring practice, before Golson made the decision to leave Notre Dame and explore his options.

The Seminoles got a good look at Golson last October, when Notre Dame played Florida State down to the final snap in Tallahassee. Golson completed 31 of 52 throws against the Seminoles for 313 yards, with three touchdowns and two interceptions in the narrow 31-27 loss.

That officially closes the book on Golson’s career in South Bend. Playing in both 2012 and 2014, Golson completed 60 percent of his passes for 3,445 yards. He threw for 41 touchdowns and 20 interceptions, including 29 touchdown passes (and 14 interceptions) last season. Golson sat out his freshman season after enrolling a semester early, and was suspended for the fall semester after an academic incident.

With Golson gone, Notre Dame will turn to Malik Zaire. With three seasons of eligibility remaining and coming off a strong late-season performance against USC and LSU after Golson was sent to the bench, Zaire earned MVP honors in the Music City Bowl.

Russell talks to SI about suspension, return

Oklahoma v Notre Dame
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Last week, we checked in on KeiVarae Russell, Notre Dame’s soon-to-be-returning star cornerback. Thanks to some reporting by Pete Sampson at Irish Illustrated—along with his own presence on social media—it’s easy to see that Russell’s been putting in the work home in Everett, Washington, while he awaits re-admission into Notre Dame.

While Russell’s stayed off the record with reporters covering the Irish beat, he spoke with Sports Illustrated‘s Pete Thamel, who traveled to the Pacific Northwest to spend some time with the exiled Irish cornerback. The result was an interesting profile that took a closer look at the student-athlete that’ll be returning to campus.

Russell was understandably tight-lipped about the academic transgressions that cost four football players the entire season and Eilar Hardy eight games. But SI’s reporting finally put in writing the academic crime that was widely speculated about: improper assistance during the summer semester.

This from the report:

The school charged Russell and his four teammates with receiving illicit academic help from a former student trainer. Russell admits to getting “lazy” and “taking the easy way out,” but beyond that only says, “I didn’t cheat on a test. I didn’t pay people to do my homework.”

The penalty cost Russell and Ishaq Williams two semesters, with Williams status with the Irish and at the university still in question. While Kendall Moore had already earned his degree and Eilar Hardy graduated and will play out his eligibility at Bowling Green, DaVaris Daniels’ left Notre Dame without his diploma, going undrafted last month before signing with the Minnesota Vikings.

Russell’s departure during training camp came in the lead up to what many expected to be a breakout season towards potential stardom. With the option to play immediately at the FCS level  in 2014 or transfer and play in 2015 somewhere else, Russell told SI, “When you go through something as important as almost getting football and a college degree stripped away from you, you take a deep breath.”

Russell also lost out on being named a captain, something athletic director Jack Swarbrick told him the coaches had decided upon during August camp.

“I busted out crying, just bawling. It was uncontrollable.”

But it’s all looking forward for Russell. He’ll find out in the coming week of his re-admittance, and he’ll be back with his teammates come June. And from there, it’ll be tough to slow down a defensive back who is hellbent on making up for lost time—pulling motivation from giving up two touchdowns against Michigan in 2013 to never wanting to be anything like his estranged father.

“My ambition comes from something bigger than me,” Russell told SI. “The reason why I work so hard, it’s to be something I want to be that’s better than just an athlete. I want to be a better father, son and brother.”

You can read the entire profile here.