Rivals.com

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 91 Ade Ogundeji, defensive end

4 Comments

Listed Measurements: 6-foot-4 ½, 251 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Sophomore with four years of eligibility remaining including 2017
Depth chart: Adetokunbo Ogundeji is one of three sophomores vying for playing time on the weakside edge. Daelin Hayes leads the group, and Julian Okwara would appear to be ahead of Ogundeji both due to Okwara seeing playing time last season and having a more prominent role this spring.
Recruiting: A consensus three-star prospect, Ogundeji originally committed to Western Michigan and P.J. Fleck before his profile picked up more attention.

CAREER TO DATE
Ogundeji preserved a year of eligibility in 2017. With his slight frame, that decision made sense. When Ogundeji signed with Notre Dame, he was listed as 6-foot-5 and 216 pounds. A year later, that listing presents a perhaps more-accurate height and, more importantly, 35 added pounds.

The year on the sidelines also allowed Ogundeji’s knee plenty of healing time after he partially tore his MCL during his final season in high school. The injury did not necessitate surgery, simply time and rehab.

QUOTE(S)
Quotes on Ogundeji are few and far between. Irish coach Brian Kelly spent National Signing Day 2016 discussing bigger picture items than going through each individual recruit. This spring, his only mention of Ogundeji was in a brief summary of injuries and recoveries.

Looking back to when Ogundeji committed to Notre Dame, he offered a realistic view of his future to the South Bend Tribune’s Tyler James.

“I understand that I’m a raw person, but I think I just need to work on my upside—getting stronger and bigger,” Ogundeji said. “That’s what I’ve been working on in the offseason. I know I’m a long person, and most of the time I’m just going into the offensive line and not knowing that I can use my hands to keep them off me. I need to use my hands much better.

“One thing I know I am is a coachable person. I know my coaches will make me better.”

WHAT KEITH ARNOLD PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
This feels like a redshirt situation. With Jay Hates and Andrew Trumbetti likely sharing the snaps at weakside (and don’t forget Daelin Hayes), Ogundeji seems a long way from being ready to contribute. So while there could be a terror off the edge developing, it’ll take a few years.

“Looking back at developmental recruits at defensive end, the Irish haven’t had the best of luck. But Ogundeji has a few things going for him other than his physical traits—mainly a academic profile that lends itself to Notre Dame.

“A good gamble to take, but he’s a wait-and-see freshman. Let’s put a pin in this until spring time.”

2017 OUTLOOK
Falling behind two classmates at his own position makes it hard to expect much from Ogundeji this season aside from perhaps some special teams success. Both Hayes and Okwara excelled in spring practices, making Ogundeji’s path forward even cloudier.

While he will see the field this season, Ogundeji’s 2017 may hold more resemblance to his freshman season on the sidelines than he likes.

DOWN THE ROAD

That does not need to be a waste, though. If Ogundeji continues forward with the mature mindset represented in the above quotes upon his commitment, further development will only bode well for his future. Simply due to the nature of college football (injuries, transfers, suspensions, etc.), there is no such thing as having too many worthwhile pass rush threats. Should Ogundeji demonstrate that ability to the Notre Dame coaches, they will find him playing time in future seasons.

Some might speculate Ogundeji’s length could make him a candidate to move to linebacker, but that seems unlikely for now. His value is as a rusher, be it in specific situations in 2017 or in a larger role in 2018-2020.

2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92 (theoretically): Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 92 (theoretically) Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle

UND.com
13 Comments

Listed Measurements: 6-foot-4, 250 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Freshman yet to enroll
Depth chart: Tagovailoa-Amosa will start at the bottom of a tackle grouping that may or may not present him the chance to move upward. (More on that later.) He will be competing with the likes of senior Pete Mokwuah and juniors Micah Dew-Treadway and, if healthy, Elijah Taylor for the chance to back up senior Jonathan Bonner.
Recruiting: Rivals.com rated Tagovailoa-Amosa as a three-star prospect, but the other recruiting services split between three stars and four stars for the Hawaiian. His recruitment was quick and late, but that was partly Tagovailoa-Amosa’s personal choice. With Hawaii high school playoffs being later than most followed by state-specific all-star games, Tagovailoa-Amosa could not take at least some of his official visits until after the season.

The Irish coaches had to wait until the morning of National Signing Day to learn if they had landed the interior project.

QUOTE(S)
Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly spoke highly of Tagoailoa-Amosa’s potential in his comments on National Signing Day. Taking those remarks at face value, Kelly may have portended a year of preserving eligibility for the incoming freshman.

“When you talk about D-linemen that are really emerging, Myron Tag-Amosa—I’m not going to give you the whole name because I will butcher it. I’ll save that as I get to know him a little better—Myron jumped off the screen with his first-step quickness,” Kelly said. “For a big guy, we really think he’s got a huge upside. We think he’s starting to scratch the surface in terms of where he can be.

“He has some length to him, pass-rush ability, inside guy. Not necessarily strictly an edge guy. He’s got some versatility. We like the fact that he’s a younger player that’s going to get better and develop.”

WHAT WE SAID WHEN TAGOVAILOA-AMOSA’S NATIONAL LETTER OF INTENT ARRIVED
Tagovailoa-Amosa continues a line of Hawaiian recruits landing in South Bend, following Manti Te’o and Kona Schwenke, both of whom excelled at Notre Dame … An excellent athlete, Tagovailoa-Amosa will be asked to fill the middle of the defensive line, but he could likely hold his own on the edge if needed in certain situations.”

2017 OUTLOOK
Tagovailoa-Amosa’s autumn will be determined by two things: His actual current weight and the progression of the three players ahead of him in the aforementioned depth chart.

Recruiting services listed Tagovailoa-Amosa at about 270 pounds his senior year, while Notre Dame touted him as 250 in its National Signing Day coverage. Typically, recruiting listings are very prone to player embellishment, unless recorded at a particular and recent camp. On the other hand, 250 pounds seems awfully light for a player Kelly considers an “inside guy.” Perhaps it explains his first-step quicknes.

If he is more toward the 270 mark, if not more after some time spent in a college weight program, then Tagovailoa-Amosa very well may be ready to give Notre Dame some worthwhile snaps in his freshman season. However, if that 250 mark is somewhat accurate, the season may be best spent on the sideline getting ready for the physicality of college football.

Between Mokwuah, Dew-Treadway and Taylor, the Irish do not have a reliable backup for Bonner. If one of those three emerges—remember Taylor suffered a LisFranc fracture in spring ball but is expected to be healthy by the end of the summer—then the need for Tagovailoa-Amosa to play in 2017 decreases drastically. If none of those three separates from the pack, though, Tagovailoa-Amosa could prove himself worthy of consideration with a strong fall camp, even if that would be in only a small sample size.

DOWN THE ROAD
The odds are Tagovailoa-Amosa spends 2017 on the sidelines. Those fictitious betting odds were heavily influenced by Kelly using buzz words such as “huge upside,” “starting to scratch the surface,” “younger player,” and “develop.”

Not to fall into the easy trap of comparing a Hawaiian to a Hawaiian, but consider former Irish defensive lineman Kona Schwenke. He appeared in a smattering of games in his first two seasons (by now, it is rather universally regarded as an unnecessary shame he lost a year of eligibility by playing in the final five games of his freshman season, 2010) and only recorded five tackles in 11 games his junior year.

Then, Schwenke recorded 23 tackles and was an all-around defensive presence his senior year. In that one season, he went from a complete non-contributor to a fringe NFL prospect.

Such a progression from Tagovailoa-Amosa while following a five-year schedule would be quite promising, and Notre Dame’s roster should present that type of opportunity following this season. Up to four defensive tackles could depart following 2017, leaving few bodies and even fewer proven commodities on the front line. (Senior Daniel Cage will be out of eligibility. It is unlikely Mokwuah is offered a fifth year and questionable for Bonner. Junior Jerry Tillery is considered a possible NFL Draft prospect after this season.)

As for this space, when will it be acceptable to refer to Tagovailoa-Amosa as simply “MTA”? That 13-character decrease into a ready-made nickname would be greatly appreciated.


Aside from the five early enrollees, the numbers are not yet known for the Irish freshmen class. That is one of the admitted drawbacks to organizing this summer-long series numerically. But a little bit of educated guessing can garner estimates for those numbers, and those estimates can allow the series to proceed without pause.

After all, the real purpose is to take a look at each player. The order, quite frankly, doesn’t matter. It is nothing more than a gimmick, be it done alphabetically, numerically or by the magic number crafted by adding the single integers of each player’s birthday. (For example, Derek Jeter’s June 26 birthday would equal 0 + 6 + 2 + 6 = 14.)

How are those estimates crafted? The first step is to take a look at certain NCAA rules. That is less helpful on defense than it is on offense. The NCAA places no stipulations on defensive integers. That is how Notre Dame ends up with one defensive end named Hayes wearing No. 93 (senior, Jay) and one defensive end named Hayes wearing No. 9 (sophomore, Daelin). Yet, only so many numbers are available. The Irish are likely to avoid any unnecessary doublings so as to lessen the chances of somehow ending up with two players wearing the same number defending, hmmm, a field goal, by chance. Obviously, such a noticeable infraction would inevitably draw a flag.

For this exercise, at least, the estimates are garnered under that presumption.

Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa is probably not going to wear No. 92, but it is possible. It certainly seems more likely than No. 25 or No. 84, both of which are unclaimed on the Notre Dame roster. Only time will tell. For today, let’s just go with No. 92.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end

Friday at 4: Information for future reference — 2017 bowl schedule

Getty Images
2 Comments

I don’t remember much from the AP Physics course I took senior year of high school. Actually, that’s not true. I remember plenty.

I remember slipping a jokester in the front row an old, defunct cell phone so I could call his actual phone to disrupt class and only the broken phone would be confiscated.
I remember removing the supports from a stool so the next person who sat on it would quickly, but gradually, sink to the floor.
I remember creating “excused” absences such that I missed more classes than I attended in the second semester of the year.

Clearly, the teacher did not have much of an impact on me. I do remember one somewhat-academic lesson from him, though. Delivered a decade ago, it is even truer today.

All his tests were painfully thorough. They were also all open-notebook. His thinking: “It is not the person who knows the most information that is smartest. It is the person that knows where and how to find the most information.”

He was and is right. Being able to rattle off a listing of statistics to win bar trivia is one thing, but other than that, finding information is just as valuable a skill nowadays as knowing it in the first place.

As the summer stretches out, some of these posts will seem out of place. Exhibit A: Today’s look at bowl schedules. “Douglas, it’s the middle of May. Notre Dame was 4-8 last season. Why in the world would we care about the dates of bowl games?”

Today, you probably don’t. But it gives me an excuse to ramble right now, and come mid-October, it gives you a resource to check without too much trouble. You’ll head to Google and quickly type in site:irish.nbcsports.com “bowl schedule” “Friday at 4” and this very entry will jump to the top of the search listings. With a quick look at the ACC standings, you will know a 4-3 Notre Dame is on pace for the Pinstripe Bowl, perhaps the Sun Bowl. You can make tentative, yet practical, travel plans accordingly.

This approach gives these postings a practical purpose, lest they quickly devolve into rambling philosophical waxings. Admittedly, there are 79 days until one might expect spring practice to start. Some inane musings very well may be inevitable.


To today’s actual purpose: The Football Bowl Association announced times for nearly all the coming winter’s 40 bowl games. Thanks to its affiliation with the ACC, Notre Dame can step in for an ACC team nearly anywhere in the ACC slate of arrangements. This presents the Irish far more preferable options—for that matter, options at all—than were sometimes available before the partial ACC membership. Most memorably, Notre Dame’s known options heading into the 2013 season boiled down to making a BCS game or hoping the Big 12 did not produce enough bowl-eligible teams so the Irish could fill its slot in the Pinstripe Bowl. That is, indeed, how that season played out.

The pertinent 2017 bowl games, in order of selection choice with a few notes, and their dates/times/locations:

College Football Playoff: Obviously, if an ACC team makes the Playoff, this list begins there. The Rose and Sugar Bowls host semifinals this year, both Jan. 1, at 5 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. ET, respectively. Moving forward, know all times listed are Eastern. (more…)

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 93 Jay Hayes, defensive end

Getty Images
7 Comments

Listed Measurements: 6-foot-3 ½, 281 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Senior with two remaining seasons of eligibility including 2017
Depth chart: Hayes and classmate Andrew Trumbetti split first-team reps at the strongside defensive end position throughout spring. By the end, it seemed Hayes had the edge with sophomore Khalid Kareem behind the two. For thoroughness’s sake, it should be noted Trumbetti is entering his final season of eligibility.
Recruiting: A consensus four-star, rivals.com ranked Hayes as the No. 14 defensive tackle in his class.

CAREER TO DATE
Hayes was set to preserve a year of eligibility in 2014 before injuries sidelined former Notre Dame defensive linemen Jarron Jones and Sheldon Day late in the season. With no other viable options along the defensive front, the Irish coaches plugged in Hayes for the final three contests. He collected two tackles and a sprained ankle.

To compensate for that action, Hayes spent his sophomore season on the sideline, setting him back on a prototypical five-year schedule.

Last season, he managed 10 tackles in 10 games with half a tackle for loss.

QUOTE(S)
One has to think part of the lack of hype around Hayes this spring was because so much was spent on sophomore weakside defensive end Daelin Hayes (no relation). Subconsciously, Jay Hayes fell down the list of those to discuss. Nonetheless, Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly did offer one pertinent and revealing quote regarding Hayes, even if it was also quite short.

“[We] would like to see him on the edge,” Kelly said after just one practice.

Even at 281 pounds, the Irish coaches do not consider Hayes a candidate for defensive tackle because they see such value from him on the outside. Why the positive spin rather than a pessimistic view? Simply put, that is what Kelly said. He did not say, “We would rather not move him inside.”

WHAT KEITH ARNOLD PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
“When Notre Dame lines up on defense against Texas, expect to see Hayes opposite Isaac Rochell at defensive end. Notre Dame’s front four will be among the largest in the country if that happens—two 290-pound defensive ends and two 300-plus pounders in the trenches.

“That said, if Hayes is going to stick at end, he might spend the summer slimming down. Shedding 10 pounds and playing closer to 275 might give him an extra half-step, something that could come in handy when coming off the edge.

“But even without a weight loss, Hayes is going to have a productive season. If healthy, I’ve got him penciled in for double-digit starts, approaching 10 TFLs, and the second most tackles on the defensive line.

2017 OUTLOOK
Hayes competing with Trumbetti throughout spring bodes well for the former. At the worst, the two split reps and each held his own in the chase for the starting strongside spot. At the best, Hayes outdid Trumbetti a bit more than was seen in open practices.

Hayes has always had a size advantage over Trumbetti, but Trumbetti’s quickness has been a bigger difference. In 2017, the question will be how Hayes makes up for that.

Last season, he missed Keith’s starting projection by double digits and the tackles mark by 35. With that in mind, expecting anything close to those figures a year later seems a big leap. Keith was discussing a relatively-complete unknown. At this point, what is known is something of a letdown.

But by no means has Hayes reached his ceiling. That is part of the frustration. One cannot know where Hayes’ ceiling might be based on what he showed his junior year.

DOWN THE ROAD
If Hayes can give an idea of his potential this season, then the Irish coaches will have good reason to invite him back for a fifth year. His size alone makes that a possibility, and notable productivity would certainly increase those odds.

Obviously, Hayes could transfer elsewhere if he does not receive that invite for the 2018 season. Presuming he graduates, Hayes could play immediately thanks to the NCAA’s stance on graduate transfers.

If he wants to play at the next level, Hayes might need to triple his career tackles this year. (12 x 3 = 36) Otherwise, he will be considered another product of New York high school football falling well short of expectations.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 94 (theoretically) Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle

Rivals.com
14 Comments

Listed Measurements: 6-foot-2, 280 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Freshman yet to enroll
Depth chart: Copy-and-pasting this section from the Darnell Ewell entry would not be inaccurate. Hinish will presumably join his classmate in competing to back up junior Jerry Tillery. It would be a surprise to see both freshmen surpass senior Daniel Cage and junior Brandon Tiassum in that positional battle.
Recruiting: A consensus three-star out of Central Catholic High School in Pittsburgh, Hinish was one of the core recruits Irish coach Brian Kelly credited with holding the class of 2017 together during the disappointing 4-8 season and subsequent assistant coaching turnover.

QUOTE(S)
In addition to praising Hinish’s communication skills among his peers, Kelly pointed to the lineman’s overall demeanor as a key to his future, possibly just as much as his physical talents, when Kelly discussed the recruits on National Signing Day.

“We really wanted that tough-guy mentality on our defensive line,” Kelly said. “Kurt brought that to us right away. Not only did he make plays, but he had a toughness to him. We wanted to upgrade that toughness across the board.

“We thought we had some big, athletic guys. We wanted that physical and mental toughness that Kurt brought to his game.”

WHAT WE SAID WHEN HINISH’S NATIONAL LETTER OF INTENT ARRIVED
Hinish will provide immediate depth and long-term potential on the defensive front, and that cannot be overrated. His was a recruitment low on drama, and thus often low on rave reviews. Those two should not depend on each as often as they do.

2017 OUTLOOK
Hinish will likely preserve a year of eligibility in 2017. Injuries could certainly force him into action, but all signs indicate he will not be needed on the defensive front this season. The talk of a lack of depth on the interior is not necessarily referencing a lack of bodies, but rather a lack of proven talents. The former does not need yet another name in the mix, and as an incoming freshman, it will be difficult for Hinish to establish himself as a proven talent.

DOWN THE ROAD
That year on the sidelines can allow Hinish to focus on getting ready for spring practice of 2018, when opportunity will certainly be there for him. As has often been seen, the biggest hurdle for a sophomore in that position is sometimes remaining healthy. (See: Dew-Treadway, Micah) If Hinish has that luxury, up to three defensive tackle departures will give him a chance to go about establishing himself as that proven talent.

It is not outlandish to see that being four defensive tackle departures, including two starters, given the possibility of junior Jerry Tillery leaving a year early to head to the NFL.


As discussed in the Darnell Ewell entry, … aside from the five early enrollees, the numbers are not yet known for the Irish freshmen class. That is one of the admitted drawbacks to organizing this summer-long series numerically. But a little bit of educated guessing can garner estimates for those numbers, and those estimates can allow the series to proceed without pause.

After all, the real purpose is to take a look at each player. The order, quite frankly, doesn’t matter. It is nothing more than a gimmick, be it done alphabetically, numerically or by the magic number crafted by adding the single integers of each player’s birthday. (For example, Derek Jeter’s June 26 birthday would equal 0 + 6 + 2 + 6 = 14.)

How are those estimates crafted? The first step is to take a look at certain NCAA rules. That is less helpful on defense than it is on offense. The NCAA places no stipulations on defensive integers. That is how Notre Dame ends up with one defensive end named Hayes wearing No. 93 (senior, Jay) and one defensive end named Hayes wearing No. 9 (sophomore, Daelin). Yet, only so many numbers are available. The Irish are likely to avoid any unnecessary doublings so as to lessen the chances of somehow ending up with two players wearing the same number defending, hmmm, a field goal, by chance. Obviously, such a noticeable infraction would inevitably draw a flag.

For this exercise, at least, the estimates are garnered under that presumption.

Kurt Hinish is probably not going to wear No. 94, but it is possible. It certainly seems more likely than No. 8 or No. 31, both of which are unclaimed on the Notre Dame roster. Only time will tell. For today, let’s just go with No. 94.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle