Washington v Notre Dame

Kyle McCarthy: Blessed with ND football during cancer fight


Throughout the ups and downs of the football season, one thing was a constant in graduate assistant Kyle McCarthy‘s first season of coaching. A life or death battle with cancer.

The former Notre Dame safety and team captain returned to campus this year, starting a life in coaching after his NFL career was cut short by injuries. But in the early days of that new journey, McCarthy’s coaching career was sidetracked after he was diagnosed with Stage Three Testicular Cancer.

Before Saturday’s game, the NBC team profiled McCarthy and took a closer look at his fight. And amidst a football season that’s not always had happy endings ever Saturday, McCarthy delivered a much-needed victory of his own when he was declared cancer free last week.

Here’s a look at the profile of McCarthy’s and how he used coaching as an outlet in his battle with cancer.


Irish defense loses Jones, Tranquill for season

Notre Dame v Syracuse

The hits just keep coming for Notre Dame’s defense. On Tuesday, Brian Kelly confirmed that defensive tackle Jarron Jones would be lost for the season. He also announced that safety Drue Tranquill tore his ACL, ending the freshman safety’s season as well.

Jones suffered a ligament tear in the middle of his foot. It’s an injury that the Irish training staff recognizes from earlier in their tenure in South Bend.

“Jarron Jones is out for the year,” Kelly announced. “He’ll have surgery next week and that’s about a four to six‑month process for that. We think we’ll get him back for spring ball.

“That’s similar injury that Braxston Cave had.  And we got him back in about four months. Rob Hunt is very confident based upon the tear there that they’ll get him back in four months.”

A return for spring practice would be welcome for the Irish defense, but will be no help against USC. Kelly also confirmed the news that Sheldon Day would not play this weekend, but is hopeful to return in time for the bowl game.

The news of Tranquill’s injury was a surprise, both to those that have watched the freshman ascend into the starting lineup and to the coaching staff that watched him play out the game against Louisville after suffering the injury.

“We didn’t even think Drue had a torn ACL,” Kelly said. “We thought he pinched the fat pad on his knee. Played the second half on it.

“That’s how strong he is, hamstring and quad area is so strong that he passed his ACL test.  Then he comes in on Sunday and he’s swollen, we’re like we need an MRI.  We get an MRI he has an ACL.”

Kelly is also optimistic about the recovery time for Tranquill, hoping to see the freshman up and running in four months and ready for full workouts come summer.

In Tranquill’s place, Elijah Shumate returns to the starting lineup. He’ll be paired with senior Austin Collinsworth, though Max Redfield is listed as the primary backup at free safety and is a better fit athletically.


With the focus now on an even younger defensive line, Kelly was asked about his early impressions of Jacob Matuska. The sophomore, who redshirted last season, made five tackles in his first significant game action.

“We got solid play. We got physical play inside. I think it was probably one play that he was out of his gap, which contributed to a fairly significant run,” Kelly said. “But by and large for his first significant playing time, we were pleased with the physical play that he showed inside.”

Matuska will anchor one of the defensive tackles spots. Los Angeles native Justin Utupo will man the other. They’ll both be backed up by true freshmen, with Daniel Cage back after an injury and Jay Hayes playing his second Saturday.


After hobbling off the field against Louisville, Cody Riggs still managed to play some key snaps at cornerback in a game where his experience was desperately needed. Riggs still technically tops one of the corner spots on the depth chart, and Kelly hopes to get a similarly gutty effort from his fifth-year senior.

“He’s in a walking boot right now just to keep the stress off that foot.  He’s a gamer, you know,” Kelly said. “We’ve got 30 something plays from him.  My guess is we’ll get something close to that again, unless something happens during the week.”

We saw sophomore Devin Butler play for the majority of the game, getting beat once by DaVante Parker for a touchdown. Cole Luke will once again do the heavy lifting at the position, challenged by Nelson Agholor.

Freshman Nick Watkins is also in the two-deep, backing up Riggs, though likely the third corner in — and the fourth if you consider Matthias Farley at nickel back.

The good, the bad, the ugly: Notre Dame vs. Louisville

Brian Kelly

The Irish exited Notre Dame Stadium for the last time in 2014. And for the second-straight week they sang the alma mater after a defeat, taking another step backwards from the home-field advantage Brian Kelly and the Irish had quietly built over the past few seasons.

The loss was Notre Dame’s fourth in five games, a third-straight defeat at a time of year where Kelly’s football teams have historically gotten better. But that’s certainly not the case in 2014, where a ravaged defense played a mix of journeymen and children, a difficult blend for any program, but especially this one.

That — combined with a slow start by the offense and struggles in the scoring areas — cost the Irish a victory. And the razor’s edge that Kelly once danced upon comfortably, has drawn blood again, another loss where one or two key plays swung the balance.

With the annual rivalry battle with USC set for Saturday afternoon, both teams enter battered and bruised. But before we get to that, let’s close the book on the Irish’s 31-28 defeat in their first ever meeting with Louisville on the gridiron.

Here are the good, bad and ugly from Notre Dame vs. Louisville.



Tarean Folston. The sophomore running back is emerging as a star player. For all the clamoring for Greg Bryant, it’s been the running back who didn’t come in with a five-star tag that’s turning into the best runner the Irish have had in the backfield since Julius Jones.

Folston didn’t get 20 carries against the Cardinals elite rushing defense, but it didn’t matter. He ran for 134 yards on just 18 carries, a 7.4 average on a day where the rest of the team managed -28 yards on nine carries. (Golson’s fumble craters that number, but it’s still a stat worth mentioning.)

Even better, Folston stayed on the field in passing situations, holding his own as a pass-blocker in a situation where Cam McDaniel usually steals snaps. In case you are wondering, his head coach noticed.

“What I’m most impressed with is that when we challenged him as a complete running back, he took that challenge and he stepped up,” Kelly said Sunday.”As you saw, he was in the game late, and he did an outstanding job in pass protection, and that was the piece that was missing for him.

“He did a great job.  And then tough yard running.  He’s just, again, a guy that’s developed as a sophomore to the point where he’s put himself in a position to get the primetime carries and be in the game late.”


Will Fuller. Another game, another touchdown for Will Fuller. Fuller has scored a touchdown in every game this season minus Stanford, and his 14 touchdown catches are one shy of the single-season mark held by Jeff Samardzija and Golden Tate, who both caught 15 in their breakout junior seasons.

Fuller is making that move as a sophomore, and doing so as it becomes more and more apparent that he’s the team’s most dynamic pass-catching weapon. Fuller got behind the talented Louisville secondary multiple times, and likely would’ve scored another touchdown if Golson could’ve gotten a deep throw out quicker.

“He’s a factor in every game we’ve played. Louisville had probably two of the better corners in the country, and he ran by them at will,” Kelly said.

Earlier in the year, Kelly hesitated to call Fuller a No. 1 receiver. On Sunday, he acknowledged the step forward Fuller has taken in his game as the season has worn on, acknowledging his ascent in a very condensed timeline.

“He has obviously put himself in a position to be considered one of Notre Dame’s finest receivers,” Kelly said. “And he’s done it in very short order. Obviously he didn’t play very much at all last year, and he’s made a statement this year.”


Jaylon Smith. After seeming lost in the shuffle after Joe Schmidt’s injury, we saw flashes of the Jaylon Smith of September on Saturday, with the sophomore linebacker leading the team with 11 tackles, including one TFL. Probably most important was the return to Smith tracking down an opponent in the backfield, an occasion that’s frequency dropped precipitously since Schmidt’s injury.

Smith was named a finalist for the Butkus Award on Monday, a tip of the cap to a talented young player who from afar still resembles an elite linebacker. But for those that have watched the sophomore the past few weeks as the Irish defense has collapsed, they’ve seen a young player whose taken some lumps as he’s learning along the way.

That’s perfectly normal. Especially for a (still) young player learning a new position in a new scheme, forced to rely not just on his elite athleticism but to deal with some limitations that come with being slightly undersized at his position in the trenches.

As he met with the media after another difficult loss, Smith sounded wise beyond his years as he took a relatively big-picture approach to things, while also understanding that winning the next game continues to be the most important thing.

“It’s experience. The whole atmosphere. Even losing, in this case, is something we’re all learning,” Smith said. “I’m young myself. I’m a sophomore. I’m 19 years old. We’re all just continuing to learn.

“Obviously, it’s not acceptable to lose at any cost. There’s no moral victory, so you can’t look at it like that. We’re not even focused on next year right now. Right now, it’s all about our rivalry next week and finding a way to get a victory.”


Cole Luke. Notre Dame’s coaching staff did their best to match the sophomore cornerback with Louisville’s DeVante Parker. Luke held his own, with Parker catching three balls against him, though Luke had two pass breakups.

But it was the catch that didn’t have Luke in coverage that burnt the Irish, with Parker matched up with Devin Butler that turned into a 21-yard touchdown.

“Outstanding,” Kelly said, when asked to evaluate Luke’s play. “Except we didn’t get the matchup on the touchdown. We had matched them up all day and didn’t get that matchup and they threw a touchdown.”

Kelly didn’t mention the gameplan to shadow Parker with Luke all game. But that’s both a testament to the improvement Luke has shown this season. It’ll also likely be the assignment with USC’s Nelson Agholor, who after exploding the previous four games was held to just three catches for 24 yards against UCLA.


The Effort from the Young Guys. Nobody wants to find moral victories out there, but not too many people had Jacob Matuska, Greer Martini and Isaac Rochell contributing sacks against Louisville. Add to that a productive afternoon for Nyles Morgan (10 tackles and a 1/2 TFL) until his ejection for targeting and the incremental steps are starting to show up.

Morgan’s ejection will cost him the first half against USC, putting Greer Martini into the starting lineup. That’s an awful long way down the preseason contingency plans for the Irish defense at a position that couldn’t be more important in this system.

After calling the targeting penalty a “careless mistake” after the game, Kelly took the long view when asked about the play of his freshman middle linebacker, reminding everybody that while he appears to be struggling now, that the sky is still the limit for Morgan.

“Oh, he’s going to be a terrific player. He just shouldn’t be on the field right now,” Kelly said. “He’s a great kid, we love him.  He’ll learn, because the kid does everything we ask him to do. He’s going to get an opportunity to be a complete player.  It’s just going to take a little bit more time.”


Greg Bryant. That’s the type of return Notre Dame can use in the punt game. Bryant showed a way to impact the game as a punt returner, nearly taking a kick to the house as the Irish rallied back from a large halftime deficit.

Bryant’s still making too many mistakes back there — no fair catch early, and the huge collision with James Onwualu was a near-crisis that was barely averted. But Bryant made a game-changing play.

Now go make a few more against USC.



The Third Down Defense. The Irish defense killed themselves early against Louisville, allowing the Cardinals to convert three key third downs that extended touchdown drives to open the game.

The mistakes were critical ones. After after allowing just four conversions on 39 attempts of 3rd and 10 or longer, the Irish defense gave up three back-breakers to put Louisville up early.

The Irish defense recovered, allowing the Cardinal to convert just six of 14 third downs, but the three long early ones killed them.


Tackling. This one might seem a little all-encompassing, but that’s kind of the point. There are some pretty elusive skill players on Louisville’s roster, but that might have been the worst tackling we’ve seen from an Irish team since the BCS title game had Zeke Motta performing fly-bys on Alabama All-Americans.

Those misses were headlined by Austin Collinsworth trying to play with one arm. Or Nyles Morgan flying by or misdiagnosing plays. Or young defensive linemen doing their best to chase down a play and miss it.


The Rush Defense. In a game where Notre Dame knew it absolutely needed to stop the run, they gave up 226 yards. Yes, it took Louisville 50 carries to do it, but still — there were just too many big runs happening, a product of injuries and missed assignments that’s timed up with the injury to Joe Schmidt.

The guys got better as the game wore on. But once again, in need of a critical drive on defense, the Irish weren’t able to get it.

Pete Sampson at Irish Illustrated ($) had this key stat that shows how far the D has fallen since Schmidt’s injury. In 30+ quarters of football with Schmidt, Sheldon Day and Jarron Jones manning the middle, the Irish gave up just 25 rushes of 10 yards-or more. In the 13 quarters since Schmidt’s broken ankle? Notre Dame’s given up 31.


Red Zone Offense. I said it very early in the game when the Irish settled for three points on their opening drive, but celebrating a made field goal masked the issue of not getting seven.

The Irish might have scored on four of five red zone drives (with the missed chip-shot field goal the back-breaker), but scoring only two touchdowns isn’t going to get it done.

Give Louisville’s defense credit. They’re a Top 10 red zone defense and a Top 5 group when it comes to allowing touchdowns in the red zone. But with a chance to win the game with a touchdown near the end, the Irish ended up needing to settle for a field goal, and even that short-circuited.

It’s popular to criticize the playcalling near the goal line. But ultimately it comes down to making the plays and being assignment correct. That didn’t happen on the final drive, with Kelly trying to run clock down and get seven, but unable to do it after struggles up front blocking derailed the final series.

When asked about the step backwards in the red zone, Kelly wasn’t willing to make any blanket statements, though acknowledged the special teams struggles and turnovers for any statistical drop off. But just like he said when Tommy Rees was playing quarterback, it comes down to making the plays in a tougher offensive environment.

“It’s really hard for me to give you a great answer other than we take a lot of time and effort to break down that area of the field and think we come away with the plan that’s going to allow us to score touchdowns in that area,” Kelly said. “But it’s still about execution.”


Safety Play. At this point, we can only speculate what Max Redfield and Elijah Shumate have done to be stuck behind Collinsworth and Drue Tranquill at safety. Because for the second consecutive game, the safety play has stunk, and Notre Dame’s best two athletes at the position still haven’t been able to work their way back onto the field.

Shumate was the missing player when the 10-man Irish gave up a critical third-down conversion to Northwestern, a junior who should know better. Redfield had mostly been an invisible presence on the back line, outside of an interception against Michigan and a missed sideline tackle against Arizona State, a play that caught the ire of analyst and former All-American linebacker Chris Spielman.

Most fans see the safety play and think that Kelly and defensive coordinator Brian VanGorder are cutting off their nose to spite their face. And there’s plenty of ammunition for that school of thought, especially after watching Collinsworth and Tranquill struggle in space against both talented and less-than-talented personnel.

But here’s what Kelly said about the situation on Sunday, asked specifically about the absence of the Shumate and Redfield.

“We would like to have the two young guys back there… but we haven’t been consistent enough,” Kelly said, while correcting himself after calling Shumate young. “That’s forced Austin into the game, and he’s not 100 percent.  He’s giving us everything he has, though.”

When effort is the best thing you can say about your injured safety, you’re essentially saying everything you need to about the guys that are being replaced. So if the message hasn’t gotten to Shumate and Redfield, there’s a chance it might not happen this year.

But with a very talented group of receivers on USC’s roster, the Irish will need to match athletes in the secondary. That means Redfield and Shumate need to do what it takes to sharpen their gaze in practice.

But Kelly was rightfully asked if the schematics of the defense weren’t part of the problem. After reminding the head coach of his comments about making it easy enough for Jaylon Smith to get on the field and allow him to use his skills, Kelly agreed to a point, before drilling down further and acknowledging the elephant in the room.

“It’s a dramatic shift from where we were last year to this year in terms of the scheme that we’re playing,” Kelly acknowledged. “So we’re never going to put it all on the players.  It’s part coaching, as well.  You’re right in the premise of your question in that we’ve got to get the best players on the field, but they also have to be the most productive players, so it’s also about production while they’re on the field.

“Max and Elijah are not on the field not just because there’s mental mistakes, but there’s production lapses, as well.  So it’s a little bit of both in that sense.  In other words, it’s not just simply the scheme, it’s also about production, and we’ve got to keep an eye on both of those things.”

It’s worth mentioning to people who continue to call for Redfield and Shumate to play. Those opinions were likely formed not by anything they saw on the field, but by the stars affixed to their recruiting rankings. Those have been rendered useless since they stepped foot on campus.

“We haven’t given up on them, let’s put it that way,” Kelly said. “We still believe in them. But they’ve got to continue to show more consistency in practice.”



Making a Field Goal. The dynamics of a successful field goal operation are three-fold: Snap, hold and kick.

Of course, that’s the simple version. But with the school’s all-time leader in field goals stepping up to tie the football game, the final two pieces of that puzzle seemed to executed at a less-than-satisfactory rate.

On the sidelines, we saw Kyle Brindza, Kelly and holder Malik Zaire talk about the hold, with Brindza frustrated and animated as he talked to Zaire.

Here’s the slo-mo version of the kick in question.




Without question, it takes a little bit too long for Zaire’s hands to clear the kicking area. The ball is late getting to the correct position on the ground.

But the ball is there, and Brindza — a senior kicker who snap-hooked two misses last week that contributed greatly to the loss against Northwestern — needs to just rip it. It’s a 32-yarder that doesn’t need anything more than brute force and direction.

Instead, Brindza pushes the ball wide right — like a golfer giving up on a swing before it’s off his club. The view of the conversation on the sideline didn’t look like a veteran coaching up a young guy. It looked like Sergio Garcia blaming a difficult lie or a Bubba Watson yelling at his caddy.

On Saturday, Kelly backed his veteran kicker. On Sunday, after reviewing the tape, his viewpoint shifted.

“I think we needed a little bit better hold, and we needed a little bit better kick.  I don’t think it’s all on the holder, and I don’t think it’s all on the kicker.  I think it was a combination of both.”

In a results based business, Brindza’s taken a nose dive at a time of year where his mistakes have been remarkably painful. In Notre Dame’s two home losses, Brindza’s missed field goals have been the difference in the final tally.


Young defensive front up for another challenge against USC

Jacob Matuska, Reggie Bonnafon

It appears that Notre Dame’s already youthful defensive line is going to be getting even younger on Saturday. After losing Jarron Jones essentially on the first play of Saturday’s 31-28 loss to Louisville, a Sunday MRI will determine the severity of the injury and whether he can play again this season.

“We think it’s a Lisfranc sprain, and we’ll just have to see what kind of separation there is in that Lisfranc to determine what his status will be,” Kelly said Sunday. “So we’ll get a little bit better read on his situation within the next couple hours.”

A report at IrishSportsDaily.com has the injury a season-ender, with reported surgery on tap next week for a ligament repair. We’ll find out tomorrow in Brian Kelly’s Tuesday press conference, but it’s looking more and more like the starting tackles on the defensive line, both Jones and fellow junior Sheldon Day, who will go through a checkup Monday, but was still in a full leg brace on Saturday, won’t be available for the all-important rivalry game.

That means fifth-year senior and Southern California native Justin Utupo will return to the starting lineup. The former Los Angeles Times lineman of the year will have a chance to make his mark against a USC offensive line that was under siege against UCLA’s pressure front.

It likely means another week on the inside for Isaac Rochell, who has been taking key reps at tackle with the depth chart plundered. That duo will be joined again by sophomore Jacob Matuska. In the first significant action of his career, Matuska played a productive game, making five tackles including his first career sack.

Freshman Jay Hayes made the stat sheet in his first collegiate game, notching a single tackle from defensive tackle. Kelly talked about his performance on Saturday, reaching the benchmark they wanted for snaps played for the first-timer — helped along by the immediate loss of Jones.

“We’re glad we activated him. We had to activate him,” Kelly said. “We didn’t want to, but he’s ready to play, and he contributed nicely for us on Saturday.”

Kelly is optimistic that he’ll have Daniel Cage back at tackle to give the depth chart a boost. The freshman would add some much-needed heft on the interior of the defensive line, giving the group an anchor up front as they need to find a way to slow down Trojans’ running back Buck Allen.

“We’re hopeful. We moved him around today,” Kelly said of his 325-pound freshman. “He looked good.  We’re expecting to practice him on Tuesday, so my best guess here would be that Cage would be available.”

A fifth-year senior who was a reach to be in the program this season is now making the third start of his career (and season). A sophomore defensive end sliding inside. And a slew of freshman figuring things out as they go. That’s just the defensive tackles. Joined by junior Romeo Okwara and freshmen Andrew Trumbetti, Kolin Hill and Grant Blankenship at defensive end, there is young and then there is this defensive front.

“I think the thing that’s really made this encouraging is that playing freshmen that physically can hang in there and hold their own with veteran players. That obviously is the most encouraging,” Kelly said. “Where we have to grow is in the football intelligence department, and we’ve got to make time for it.

“As you know, there’s a lot of rigors for these guys, and a lot of work that has to go into the classroom, and we’ve got to carve out more time in the offseason for these guys to continue to learn football and understand the game.  That’s going to be the next point of development for especially our defensive players and some players on offense, is understanding the game, and that development has to take place in the off‑season.”

Five things we learned: Louisville 31, Notre Dame 28

Austin Collinsworth, Joe Schmidt

Kyle Brindza stared down his spot. Envisioned making the kick. Took a final deep breath before waiting for the snap.

And then he missed it.

Notre Dame’s comeback efforts were left for dead as the Irish’s all-time leader in field goals missed yet another one, pushing a 32-yarder wide right as Louisville escaped South Bend with a 31-28 victory.

[WATCH: Full replay of the game ]

Debate focused on Malik Zaire’s hold. Starting for the second-straight game as the team’s holder, Zaire’s hand was out late as Brindza approached the chip shot. After the game, Kelly backed his record-setting kicker.

“I don’t think it was executed at the level it needed to be,” Kelly said. “I didn’t see it. I’ll have to watch it on film, but in talking to Kyle, it did not appear to be handled cleanly.”

That’s kindly framing a situation for a senior kicker whose late-game failings for the second-straight week threaten to undo a legacy that was built on making clutch kicks, regardless of the slight imperfections from a new holder.

But that’s the type of season we’ve found ourselves in, parceling out smidgeons of blame in a black-or-white, win-or-not situation.

With the Irish limping into their season finale against USC next week, let’s find out what else we learned.



A senior class that did a lot of good for this football program unfortunately doesn’t go out a winner at home. 

There are no consolation prizes in football. And while the Irish deserve credit for giving it their all and responding after a mediocre first half, in the end it wasn’t enough.

For the first time since Brian Kelly took over the Notre Dame football program, the Irish didn’t send their seniors out winners. And frankly, the seniors had plenty to do with that.

Brindza’s missed field goal at the end was the last critical mistake. But just two plays before that seniors Matt Hegarty and Nick Martin failed on a double-team block that led to a painful loss on a second down quarterback draw.

“We ran a quarter draw and we got our butts kicked up front,” Kelly said, when asked about the playcall.

On defense, seniors were few and far between. But when you did notice fifth-year captain Austin Collinsworth, it was on a missed tackles, with Louisville running backs and wide receivers flying by the wounded but game senior safety.

So Saturday’s loss ends the home career of a group of star-crossed football players that battled through quite a few detours to get here. And while this class splintered apart because of injuries and attrition more than any of the other Kelly recruited, the Irish head coach had a message of pride and thanks to his wounded locker room.

“They came in a program that had not had won a bowl game in 20 years,” Kelly said. “Now they have won two and played for a National Championship and obviously are part of developing and building a winning program. I’m proud of them.”




With injuries taking Jarron Jones and Cody Riggs off the field as well, it’s kids, kids and more kids on Brian VanGorder’s beleaguered defense. 

Jarron Jones opened the game up making a big play. Unfortunately he wasn’t healthy for the rest of it. Notre Dame’s starting defensive tackle was the latest key starter to go down, finally tapping out after a hobbling leg injury forced him out of the lineup.

The same happened to Cody Riggs. The senior cornerback was making progress as he battled to return from a stress-reaction in his foot, but he was spotted gingerly walking off the field to the locker room, leaving the secondary for Collinsworth and the kids.

“We played the whole game pretty much without Jarron Jones,” Kelly said afterwards. “They battled as best they could. We’re getting everything out of them. I mean, they played with great effort, just made some mistakes.”

Those mistakes came early, as Louisville’s first two drives turned into touchdowns. And both times, the Irish defense let the Cardinals out of their clutches.

A back-breaking 3rd-and-14 conversion allowed a 10-play, 75 yard drive to end in a touchdown run by freshman quarterback Reggie Bonnafon. Louisville’s next possession, the Cardinals connected on a 3rd-and-16 for 52 yards, allowing Bonnafon to run for another zone-read touchdown to cap off a second-straight touchdown drive.

It wasn’t all bad. We saw Jay Hayes hold his own on the defensive line in his first collegiate action. We watched Jacob Matuska and Greer Martini earn their first sacks. And while Nyles Morgan’s clear-cut personal foul got him ejected from the game, he made 10 tackles, a step forward after a few difficult weeks.

But after getting some critical stops to help build some momentum, the Irish defense couldn’t slow down Louisville’s run game, even when they committed just about all their resources to doing so.


After nearly playing his way out of the quarterback job, Everett Golson swatted away the vultures and played a much better second half. 

Another football game, another crisis surrounding Notre Dame’s quarterback. After starting the game sharp, Golson threw a critical interception deep in Irish territory, staring down Will Fuller as cornerback Charles Gaines squatted on a comeback route. The Irish defense actually picked up their quarterback, making Golson’s errant throw just a three-point mistake by holding Louisville to a field goal. But it was more gift-wrapped points, three that just so happened to be the final difference in the game.

But Golson very nearly lost his job after another maddening fumble. The senior quarterback peeled back, trying to tuck the football away late before the ball skidded out, back towards the Irish end zone. Senior Nick Martin threw some gas on the fire, with the ball popping out from beneath him as he tried to recover the fumble.

Golson finally showed some urgency, getting to the ball as it slid out of bounds 32-yards behind where it started.

From 2nd-and-6 to 3rd-and-38. From grumbles asking for Malik Zaire to see the field to full-throated screams. NBC’s Mike Mayock thought it was time to make a change. Doug Flutie looked at Golson’s body language and didn’t like what he saw.

But Brian Kelly went to the half and came back out with Golson behind center. And the senior quarterback responded, helping the Irish score touchdowns on their first two possessions to pull ahead.

Golson’s heroics didn’t come without some magic, and a little luck. A jump-ball to Corey Robinson ended up in Will Fuller’s arms for his 14th touchdown. And while Golson’s two-point scramble pulled the Irish within three, he couldn’t get a touchdown to finish the game when the Irish needed it.

“I think he did some good things. There are some things that we want to do better, but he made some great plays with his feet,” Kelly said.

Golson’s 16 of 24 for 236 and two touchdowns against one of the best defense’s in the country wasn’t bad. And after rallying in the second half after a blundering first half, the senior quarterback deserves some credit for bringing the team back and avoiding a full-fledged quarterback controversy.


While most will talk about another missed field goal, the Irish special teams provided a few big plays, too. 

Kelly probably said it best after the game, summarizing the frustrations of a two-game home losing streak that not many people saw coming in October.

“We’ve lost back-to-back games because we couldn’t put down a ball and kick it 32 yards,” Kelly said.

A special teams unit that’s once again taking the blame for the loss very nearly was a key factor in winning the football game. Greg Bryant sparked Notre Dame with an explosive punt return that he nearly took into the end zone. Amir Carlisle set up the Irish multiple times with good field position on kickoff returns.

And with the cover teams doing an excellent job slowing down Louisville’s return men, the Irish had set themselves up quite well in a game that required winning the field position battle, too.

But all of that doesn’t matter if you can’t make the plays when they count.



Sometimes the night is darkest just before the dawn. 

Football has a funny way of revealing your most crippling weaknesses. The past month has done that.

Notre Dame’s depth on defense has been decimated, turning a group that seemed ahead of schedule in October into one searching badly for answers in November. An Irish offense blessed with better weapons than they’ve had in years only now understands that those weapons don’t mean much if you aren’t properly equipped to handle them.

So while there’s much doom and gloom as we watch Notre Dame stumble in ways they haven’t seen since the Weis era, when fans wipe the tears out of their eyes, they’ll see some of the groundwork being laid for a quicker rebound.

The kids that stood their ground and held up more than respectably against Louisville’s offense? They’ll develop some scar tissue that’ll pay dividends in the future. And while outsiders and followers will wonder if Notre Dame’s head coach and leader has lost his team, it’s not hard to see the energy and emotion on the sidelines as proof positive that this team understands how to fight, even if it’s taking one too many shots to the jaw right now.

“I mean, I can say some cliché things, but I think everybody just has to keep their head up. We’ve got a lot of young guys that have a lot of potential,” Golson said after the game. “It’s kind of one of those things where it’s kind of heartbreaking for us to lose, but you can’t stay down because we do have so much talent. We’ve got to still play with confidence. We’ve got to still play aggressive. I think if we do that, like I said, the talent is there, so I think that will kind of show itself.”

Right now, that talent might not be enough to stop a fade that could extend into a less-than-desirable bowl game. But the pieces are there for a recovery, even if we had to watch them crumble to the ground first.