In this Sept. 4, 2016 file photo, Notre Dame wide receiver Equanimeous St. Brown, right, celebrates with teammates after catching a 19-yard touchdown pass during during an NCAA college football game in Austin, Texas. The wide receiver is living up to his name. St. Brown said his father, John Brown, a two-time Mr. Universe, gave him his first name because he liked the word equanimity, which the dictionary defines as the quality of remaining calm, undisturbed, especially under tension or strain. (AP Photo/Eric Gay File)

Spartans next big challenge for young Irish team


Brian Kelly was happy with his team’s progress from Week One to Week Two. He’ll be even happier if his team makes the same leap in their third game.

That’ll likely mean Notre Dame retains the Megaphone Trophy. It’ll also mean the Irish found a way to take the next step in the evolution of a young team that’s showed the same type of resiliency that powered last year’s team to ten wins.

But to do that, the Irish will need to keep improving. And they’ll need to beat one of the most consistent programs of the last decade. Kelly acknowledged that on Tuesday, his weekly press conference as much about a look inward as Michigan State.

“I think the next step for this team is to play in all phases of the game at a higher level,” Kelly said. “We’re going to get that this week against a very good Michigan State football team.”

The phase that most wonder about are getting coached up this week by Brian VanGorder. Hopeful to build on a nice performance against Nevada, the Irish will face significantly upgraded personnel, but a team still finding its footing—the Spartans running out a veteran, but reshuffled, offensive line, an inexperienced receiving corps, and a new starting quarterback.

Of course, Notre Dame’s not without its challenges. A secondary that’s being rebuilt on the fly, linebackers facing another physical challenge, and a defensive front that desperately needs to get to the quarterback. But there was plenty of progress last weekend. And now that progress will need to take hold against a program that’s lost its share of frontline talent but certainly has shown an ability to rebuild.

Offensively, Michigan State’s defense will always be a challenge. Especially with a star like Malik McDowell. But the Spartans secondary isn’t the group that touted its No Fly Zone the last time the Irish took on Michigan State. And while the young Irish receivers will certainly be facing their stiffest challenge this season, Kelly had some simple advice for them.

“Run! Just keep running,” Kelly said, before comparing this young group favorably to the one that last played against the Spartans. “I think we’re in a better position. If they want to press us, we just need to run, run our routes, do what we do, and we’ll make enough plays.”

Putting all the pieces together is the next step. In front of a home crowd that’ll be far more excited than last weekend, Notre Dame has a chance to go toe-to-toe against a team that’s viewed as a Top 10 program. Exit with a win and they’ll go a long way towards rebuilding the momentum that escaped in double overtime against Texas.


Can Notre Dame rebuild its secondary on the fly?

SOUTH BEND, IN - SEPTEMBER 10: Ahki Muhammad #3 of the Nevada Wolf Pack gets tripped up by Cole Luke #1 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish in the second half of the game at Notre Dame Stadium on September 10, 2016 in South Bend, Indiana. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

Shaun Crawford is done for the season. Max Redfield didn’t make it to the season opener. Nick Watkins is still waiting on a broken arm to heal. Devin Butler is suspended indefinitely and wearing a walking boot.

A talented depth chart went from stockpiled to bare bones in two weeks, a nice reminder that you can never have enough talent on a roster.

So the Irish move forward, likely junking their latest contingency plan to try and find a way to stabilize the back-end—all while teaching a remarkably young group of defensive backs to grow up quickly. It’s a challenge that nobody saw coming entering the season. But it’s one that’s par for the course as Notre Dame continues to battle tough luck on the defensive side of the ball.

It’s not all bad news. Especially when you consider that Michigan State and Duke are still breaking in young quarterbacks, with Syracuse, NC State and Stanford not much more experienced.

But how can the Irish rebuild a secondary that’s already showed holes? A few humble suggestions below.



Devin Studstill played every snap of the Nevada game, a toss into the proverbial deep end if there ever was one. Studstill held up just fine, likely making the Irish coaching staff wish they’d have trusted the talented youngster more against Texas, when the staff chose to lean on Drue Tranquill and Avery Sebastian instead of the true freshman.

It took less than a half of football in Austin to understand that wasn’t going to work. And now two games into the season it’s Studstill or bust at free safety, a choice that gives the Irish defense a look towards the future while also best serving their present-day goals.

Studstill wasn’t perfect on Saturday. But he was strong in run support and had no major hiccups in the passing game, already an athletic improvement over Tranquill and Sebastian, two in-the-box defenders asked to be too far outside their comfort zone in centerfield.

You never want to be breaking in a true freshman safety. But doing it now against quarterbacks just as green as Studstill is at least making the best of a bad situation.



Nick Coleman has a bullseye on his back. And he will until he starts making some plays. Coleman knows that, Brian Kelly knows that, and everybody in Notre Dame Stadium on Saturday night will know that, too.

“They’re going to keep going at Nick Coleman,” Kelly acknowledged. “We’re quite aware of that situation. But I think Nick has showed himself that he’s up to the task and he’s going to continue to work to get better at it. When you lose a player like Crawford, the guy that comes in, they’re going to pick on him. But I like the fact that Nick has made the kind of corrections necessary to go out there and compete for the football.

Some of those adjustments showed on the field against Nevada. Then again, so did Coleman’s downfield stumble, turning for the football but then losing his feet on an easy deep ball completion.

Assuming Ashton White is no longer in the head coach’s doghouse, he should be getting a look during practice. So should Donte Vaughn, the lanky freshman able to make up for some mistakes with his length and athleticism. Jalen Elliott and Julian Love are competitive, high-IQ football players. Give them a shot and see what happens.

The staff isn’t giving up on Coleman, nor should they. He’s a competitive kid, a good athlete and someone they think highly of.

But he’ll need to find a way to get his mental game straighten out quickly. Because opposing quarterbacks aren’t going to be looking at Cole Luke when they’ve got Coleman on the other side of the field.  And the ball will keeping coming at him until he starts making some plays.



Notre Dame’s 3-3-5 against Texas will likely go down as the bad-idea of the season, a move designed to give the Irish their best chance at winning, but one that could also be considered outthinking themselves. Of course, that’s ignoring the job Texas did in the trenches, the missed tackles by the players Notre Dame put in position to make the plays, and the deep throws that went over the top of a coverage scheme designed to guard against that very thing.

But that’s football. And a big reason why Brian VanGorder will now go back to the chalkboard, hoping to design a defense that allows his young talent to figure things out, but also gives his scheme a chance to make up for some glaring personnel weaknesses.

Even the best secondary can’t cover receivers forever. And with Notre Dame’s current pass rush, that’s the ask. (At least if they want to drop six or seven.) That same pressure is applied if the front seven can’t slow down an opponents run game—committing extra hats to the box should help, but it leaves a young secondary vulnerable and on islands.

With the heat already cranked up on VanGorder, it’ll be the long-time assistant’s job to find a happy medium, manufacturing confusion and heat on quarterbacks while also making sure the Irish can win on first and second downs.

None of that sounds simple. But of course, that’s what young players need—and why VanGorder’s paychecks have all those zeroes.



Don’t expect things to be solved on Saturday. But progress needs to be made, making sure that the team Notre Dame puts on the field in October is better than the one asked to survive September.

Brian Kelly has built a roster to his liking. He’s had a successful recruiting run. And he’s found defensive backs that fit the profile that VanGorder is looking for, man-coverage skills that should be able to hold up in space better than the Cover 2 players he inherited.

Now Todd Lyght needs to coach them up. VanGorder needs to keep designing sound schemes. And Kelly needs his offense to support the other side of the football—taking pressure off his defense by either scoring points by the bushel or keeping opponents off the field. (Preferably both.)

DeShone Kizer and the offensive line can be a big piece of the defensive puzzle. So can a three-headed running back position that can eat clock and limit possessions. With a quarterback capable of winning football games with his arm, his feet and—more importantly—his head, adjusting a game plan to pick up the slack for the defense shouldn’t be asking too much.

Because if it allows the defense to tread water for a few weeks as the kids get used to things, this defense can get better week to week.

The good, the bad, the ugly: Notre Dame vs. Nevada


What a difference a week makes. Brian Kelly’s post-Texas proclamation to “relax” seems much easier now than last Monday. That’s what an easy notch in the win column does for you. And a defense that looked much better playing in its base set than trying to slow down Texas.

While a true test of what this team looks like won’t come until next Saturday night against Michigan State, a 25-point second quarter—and some big plays by Brian VanGorder’s defense—made sure that the sky wasn’t falling.

Let’s put the win against the Wolf Pack behind us as the preparations turn towards Sparty. The battle for the Megaphone awaits.



Red Zone Offense. What a difference a year makes. At least so far. Notre Dame’s offense clearly lacks the explosiveness of last season’s. That’s to be expected when you lose freaks like Will Fuller and C.J. Prosise. But the Irish efficiency is much improved, a credit to DeShone Kizer and the Irish red zone offense.

The Irish were six for six again this week, scoring five touchdowns in their drives inside the 20-yard line. (And memo to the RTDB Crowd: Justin Yoon’s field goal came after three-straight runs inside Nevada’s 10-yard line.) The biggest change? Kizer’s accuracy.

A tweet from Pete Sampson at Irish Illustrated laid it out best: In 2015’s regular season, Kizer went 17 of 40 in the red zone, throwing nine touchdowns and five interceptions. This season, Kizer’s already completed 7 of his 10 throws, with five touchdowns and, most importantly, no interceptions.


The Run Defense. Things aren’t necessarily broken up front for the Irish, with Notre Dame’s under siege front seven limiting Nevada to just 99 rushing yards on 30 attempts. The strength of the Wolf Pack offense was the ground game, and the Irish withstood a few wrinkles—including a dose of triple option—to keep Nevada’s offense offtrack.

A return to base defense certainly helped. So did a strong performance for Te’von Coney, making his first start at Will linebacker, replacing Greer Martini in the lineup. But once the Irish found their footing on the opening series, the unit built on that crucial 4th-down stop and played very good football.

“We still have a lot of work to do, but we came together,” Daniel Cage said postgame. “We got on each other and took over the game.”

Cage’s knifing stop on fourth down triggered that. So did a very nice game by James Onwualu, who chipped in two TFLs from the Sam linebacker position. Throw in an impactful game by Jonathan Bonner, who almost doubled his snap count from a week earlier, and the front seven is evolving and finding its footing in time for another stiff test.


The Kids. There were a lot of firsts for the Irish on Saturday. Catches for receivers Corey Holmes, Kevin Stepherson, Chris Finke and Chase Claypool. Starts for Te’von Coney and Devin Studstill, and appearances for young players Jamir Jones, Khalid Kareem, Tristen Hoge and Trevor Ruhland.

Just as important as any debuts was deepening the rotation. Cornerback Donte Vaughn is a key piece of the puzzle now with Shaun Crawford lost for the season. Julian Love is now the team’s starter at nickel back. And if Nick Coleman continues to struggle, don’t be surprised if Jalen Elliott finds his way onto the field more as well.

Last season’s defensive rotation was almost nonexistent. That won’t be the case this year, as Kelly commented on how he thinks his defense can improve with more players taking on key roles.

“I think it makes us a better defense. I think moving forward you’re going to see a combination of more guys instead of maybe just one or two guys in that rotation.” Kelly was talking specifically about the linebackers in that comment, though it clearly applies to all pieces of the defensive puzzle.


Quick Hits: 

Sure, it was a slow start. But Notre Dame’s second quarter explosion had the Irish scoring 25 points, the most in a quarter since the Irish scored 28 against Pitt in 2005, Charlie Weis’ debut.

Brian VanGorder’s defense has usually featured a playmaker at Sam linebacker. Senior captain James Onwualu is quickly becoming one, his two TFLs very impactful. (He nearly had three, but crashed a bit too far inside on a Nevada end-around.)

No, the interception didn’t count. But it was a really nice play by Cole Luke, who was his steady self on Saturday, and also very good against the run.

Great hands by Kevin Stepherson, who took a big hit, but held on to his first touchdown. That’s a lot of trust in a freshman in the red zone.

Nice hands by Jarron Jones, too. Snagging that screen pass that set up an Irish score.

“I think I have great hands,” Jones said postgame. “These hands aren’t big for nothing. I know I can grab a ball.”

A week after Greer Martini earned the starting job at the Will linebacker spot, it looks like Te’von Coney took it back. The sophomore tied for the team lead with five tackles, including one for loss.



Pass Rush. With Nevada chasing the Irish after a big second quarter, the Wolf Pack needed to go to the air to try and mount a comeback. So while Nevada quarterbacks Tyler Stewart and Ty Gangi threw 26 times, the Irish defense didn’t get a single sack.

Adding in the Texas stats and the Irish defense has yet to sack the quarterback on 53 passing attempts. They’ve statistically gotten seven quarterback hits, with only Isaac Rochell notching more than one (he has three).

While Jay Hayes continues to recover from a high-ankle sprain, Andrew Trumbetti is manning the weakside defensive end spot. And for the second-straight week, Trumbetti hasn’t mounted anything close to a pass rush, locked down by offensive linemen and generating a second week of negative grading in the pass rush category by PFF College.

We saw young players get their shot at generating a pass rush. Khalid Kareem took a 15-yard personal foul for a late hit (announced during the broadcast as Jay Hayes), while Jon Bonner, Daelin Hayes, Julian Okwara and Jamir Jones also played.

But the Irish need to find a way to get a pass rush. Especially to support a secondary that’s going to be learning as they go with Crawford down and freshmen Julian Love and Devin Studstill playing key roles.


The Slow Start. I had a hard time finding a more frustrating first 15 minutes in recent memory than Saturday’s. Whether it was the offense committing penalties to slow themselves down or the opening drive for Nevada, it was an ugly start to a game where I’m sure the coaching staff stressed “start fast.”

Some of that could be attributed to Shaun Crawford’s injury. Some to the new wrinkles from first-year Nevada offensive coordinator Tim Cramsey. But whatever the cause, it took some time for the Irish to settle in, something that won’t make next weekend easy.



Shaun Crawford’s season-ending injury. We talked about the on-field implications. But watching Shaun Crawford go down after making another big play was devastating.

After the game, Cole Luke talked about moving forward without him.

“Shaun’s a great player. He’s just a freak of nature and one of those guys who loves the game,” Luke said. “He comes out to work every single day. That’ll be hard to replace, but we’ll try to lock that in on the young guys.

“You never know when your last play or rep will happen, so you have to treat it like your last. We have a lot of great young guys who will step up and try to fill that role.”

Expect Brian Kelly to reveal more on the time frame of Crawford’s surgery and recovery later today and this week. But we’ve already heard from Crawford on social media—and his response is incredible.


Five things we learned: Notre Dame 39, Nevada 10


Notre Dame’s home opener went the way you’d want. An easy victory, a ton of young players getting experience, and a team back on track with Michigan State coming to town next weekend.

And while head coach Brian Kelly said all the right things about a Nevada team that threw the kitchen sink at the Irish, Wolf Pack head man Brian Polian probably said it best.

“If we were supposed to beat Notre Dame, we wouldn’t be in the Mountain West conference.”

It wasn’t all easy. The Irish offense was slow out of the gate. The defense struggled on their opening series, but made some game-changing plays and held Nevada to just 300 yards. After after a first 20 minutes that was as forgettable as any from last season, the Irish’s talent took over, a victory inside Notre Dame Stadium that leveled the team to 1-1 on the year.

Let’s find out what we learned.


The loss of Shaun Crawford will be felt on and off the field.

The defense suffered a painful loss Saturday afternoon when Shaun Crawford went down early with a season-ending achilles injury. The sophomore was hurt after breaking up a pass that initially looked like a forced fumble and recovery. And instead of it being another big play by the diminutive defensive back, it’s a heartbreaking second-straight lost season for Crawford.

A season after not having a Plan B when Crawford went down in August, the Irish will now deploy theirs. That means Nick Coleman back to corner, a week after getting torched at Texas. True freshman Julian Love moves to nickel. And freshman Donte Vaughn will continue to get a look as the Irish secondary waits for junior Nick Watkins to recover from his broken arm.

Earlier in the week, Kelly talked about Coleman’s need to rebound and stay ready. Little did he know that a few days later, he’d be back in the starting lineup.

“Nick played with much better technique and a lot more confidence,” Kelly said. “He’s got to be that player for us with Shaun lost for the season.”


The defense woke up and made some plays.

The Irish defense played much, much better on Saturday, a relief not just to the 80,000 inside Notre Dame Stadium and the millions watching at home, but to a coaching staff that had to be wondering what to make of the unproven unit.

Especially after Nevada’s opening drive.

The Wolf Pack marched 62 yards on their opening possession, moving the chains and sustaining a 10-play drive that saw Polian eschew a field goal attempt for a 4th-and-1 run inside the Irish red zone. But Asauni Rufus never had a chance when Daniel Cage knifed through the line and the stop was a big momentum changer for the Irish defense, giving up just 61 yards the rest of the first half.

“We needed some confidence,” Kelly said postgame. “So that fourth-down stop was really a confidence builder for our defense.”

Also building their confidence was Jarron Jones’ interception, the fifth-year senior snagging a screen pass and setting the Irish offense up with the ball near the goal line. While the defense’s two other big plays—Crawford’s forced fumble and Tranquill’s return, along with a very nice interception by Cole Luke—were both overturned by referees, the defense played more than respectable after getting bludgeoned in Austin.

It took a group of back-ups to finally give up a touchdown to Nevada and the Wolf Pack were held to just 300 total yards— a big step forward for a unit that focused not on mixing and matching exotic looks, but playing fundamentally sound football.

“I thought we tackled better, played the ball better in the air, and just made the kind of improvement that we were looking for from week one to week two,” Kelly said.


DeShone Kizer is the engine of this offense. 

After earning the starting job, DeShone Kizer backed it up with a near flawless performance, a 15 for 18 day with two touchdowns, the only poor throw on the afternoon an underthrown deep ball to Kevin Stepherson. Add in another touchdown on the ground and two more through the air and Kizer’s responsible for nine touchdowns through the first two weeks, elite play by the junior signal caller.

Kelly praised Kizer’s poise, applauding that he’s willing to take what the defense is giving him. He also praised Kizer’s development in the scoring area, the Irish scoring all six times they were in the scoring zone, with five touchdowns and just one field goal.

“I think he was a little bit more patience in certain areas,” Kelly said. “Especially in the red zone. Where now he’s had two touchdowns in the red zone where he’s been really patient, hitting his third and fourth option down there.”

With the game in hand, Kizer turned the keys of the offense over to Malik Zaire, who played well in relief, making a few big plays and driving the Irish to a score. But Kizer is the most important piece of the puzzle for this team, and his efficiency—even while breaking in a young group of receivers—has been really impressive.


With Equanimeous St. Brown and C.J. Sanders, the Irish have two young, dynamic talents at receiver. 

Don’t look now, but Notre Dame has two emerging stars at wide receiver. Both Equanimeous St. Brown and C.J. Sanders continued their hot start, with both sophomores playing large without Torii Hunter available.

St. Brown had 85 yards and six catches, nearly breaking two big plays early. Sanders’ numbers might have been more modest, five catches for 46 yards and a score, but he came through with a clutch fourth-down conversion and scored the team’s first touchdown.

With Will Fuller, Chris Brown and Amir Carlisle all gone, Kelly talked about the challenge to replace that trio and fill their shoes with the next generation.

“We had the spring and the summer to really spend the time at developing. We knew they had to be the next guys in,” Kelly said. “And we had a lot of confidence that we were going to be able to turn over a very good group. But they needed to obviously work together.”

While Kelly applauded the jump in play from week one to week two for the defense, the same step forward was made by the young receivers, with Kevin Stepherson scoring his first touchdown, Corey Holmes converting a clutch third-and-long, and Chris Finke and Chase Claypool making their first career grabs.

“We wanted to get them involved early. We felt like it was important to get Corey and Stepherson some touches early,” Kelly said. “Get them some confidence and they’ll make some plays for us.”


Kelly will keep rotating backs, but Josh Adams is quickly establishing himself as a workhorse.

Josh Adams had a big Saturday. And Notre Dame’s record-setter as a freshman did his best to take a three-man rotation and make it a one-man show. Adams only needed 10 touches to get past 100 yards, running for 106 yards and breaking off a nifty 43-yarder in the third quarter.

Though Adams, Tarean Folston and Dexter Williams each got ten carries, Kelly was asked postgame if Adams is starting to emerge as the team’s No. 1 back.

“He’s good. You can call him whatever you want. No. 1, No. 101,” Kelly said. “It’s one of those things where Folston had 10 carries, Adams had 10 carries and Williams had 10 carries, but you can make the argument that (Adams) should get 20.

“But Folston is a pretty sharp guy and Dexter is explosive. I think we’ll keep a balance in there, but Adams looked good today.”

In his first extended playing time this season, Williams showed a burst that might have been better than both Adams and Folston. So while the loss of C.J. Prosise (and his home-run speed) has changed the complexion of the Irish ground game, Adams’ ascent is coming at a perfect time—with Michigan State just around the corner.



Behind the Irish: Playing for Notre Dame


For the first time in 2016, the Fighting Irish will take the field in Notre Dame Stadium. And while so many changes are taking place in the house that Rockne Built, the thrill stays the same for players getting a chance to run out of the tunnel.

“We talk all the time about what it is to be part of Notre Dame’s football program and how special that is,” head coach Brian Kelly said on Thursday. “Just being in the Stadium (Thursday), they clearly feel the energy and what it’s like to come out of that tunnel. It’ll be exciting. There’ll be a lot of adrenaline flowing. It is for me too every time I go out of that tunnel.”

A young team that’ll be relying on a lot of freshman will experience that for the first time. And in a feature for NBC Sports, Malik Zaire, James Onwualu, DeShone Kizer, Nyles Morgan and other Irish players talk about what it’s really like to play for Notre Dame.