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Showtime first look: Emotional Tranquill earns game ball


Notre Dame safety Drue Tranquill was playing the game of his life when his season suddenly ended while celebrating a big play near the end of the first half. Tranquill suffered a torn ACL that’ll end his second-straight season with a major knee injury.

And while that injury led to some predictable scorn on the internet and in the sports-talk radio circuit, Tranquill earned the game ball from Brian Kelly, given to both the sophomore safety and the entire defense for its sterling performance against Georgia Tech’s triple-option attack.

After the game, Tranquill was the model of composure and grace, handling his injury with an incredible amount of dignity. And in probably his most telling statement, Tranquill said the following when given the opportunity to speak to his teammates.

“Today was the ultimate team game for the defense. I’m not feeling sorry for myself, man, I’m just sorry I can’t be back out there with you all,” Tranquill said. 

For a first-look at tonight’s “A Season With Notre Dame Football,” Showtime’s production cameras caught Tranquill as he addressed his teammates.

Give it a watch here:

As injuries mount, Kelly acknowledges depth chart has breaking point

SOUTH BEND, IN - SEPTEMBER 19: Jaylon Smith #9 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish returns a fumble against the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets in the third quarter at Notre Dame Stadium on September 19, 2015 in South Bend, Indiana. Notre Dame defeated Georgia Tech 30-22. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

Next Man In has been a bedrock philosophy for Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly. But even he understands that the Irish are approaching a breaking point.

The loss of Drue Tranquill is the latest season-ending injury for the Irish, pushing the Irish coaching staff into a sticky spot at safety, the latest position group to see its depth chart tested. And as the Irish move forward this week as their focus turns to UMass, Kelly acknowledged that the Irish need to weather the storm, especially at a few key positions.

“Certainly we can’t afford to lose any more players at key positions,” Kelly said. “Quarterback, running back, you start to get into true freshmen, and that will be obviously a significant change in what we look like.”

At quarterback, true freshman Brandon Wimbush was warming up on the sidelines when Georgia Tech recovered an onside kick and held onto the football. Expect to see Wimbush this weekend, with Kelly knowing full well that he needs to get his young quarterback experience before he heads to Death Valley.

Behind C.J. Prosise, freshman Josh Adams received just three carries on Saturday. But both he and Dexter Williams will likely get a chance to wet their feet against a UMass defensive front that gave up 390 rushing yards to the Colorado Buffaloes.

With Tranquill the latest hard-luck Domer to go down, the safety position gets interesting. Avery Sebastian is still a few weeks away from returning, likely after the off week. Max Redfield stayed off the field on Saturday, both scheme and a broken hand limiting him.

That could lead to utilityman Matthias Farley stepping into the lineup, at a position that’s not exactly his natural spot. Or it could means freshman Nicco Fertitta is activated. Kelly was candid when he said he and Brian VanGorder hadn’t decided what to do yet.

“Matthias has the ability to play a couple of different positions,” Kelly explained. “Brian (VanGorder) and I have not had that personnel conversation yet relative to what will be the next move that we make there. Whether we bring somebody up into that role, or whether it’s Nicco Fertitta, or do we have (Nicky) Baratti move. We’ve got to make that decision here in the next 24 hours. I’m not really sure yet.”

The loss of Tranquill takes away an important piece of Notre Dame’s option puzzle, with Navy still to come. And with the defense already short Jarron Jones and nickel back Shaun Crawford, how this team keeps things together remains to be seen.

“There is a break point. You know, we are still at a point where we have guys that can come in and step in,” Kelly said. “But there’s no question that we have to be able to stem the tide here with these injuries.”

The good, the bad, the ugly: Notre Dame vs. Georgia Tech

Chris Milton, Will Fuller

What a difference a day makes. The third Saturday of the college football season was a crazy one, with the happenings in South Bend far from the only eye-opening outcome on the weekend.

Alabama went down. USC lost to Stanford at home for the fourth time in their last five contests in the Coliseum. Big bad Ohio State looked far from that as they struggled to beat Northern Illinois 20-13, while future Notre Dame opponent Clemson’s defense carried the Tigers against Louisville in a closer-than-expected 20-17 win.

On a day where Colorado, Kansas State, Miami, South Alabama, Syracuse, Toledo and UTEP all won in overtime, Notre Dame served notice with its convincing 30-22 victory. The AP moved Notre Dame up to No. 6, while the coaches slid the Irish up to No. 8.

With UMass set to visit South Bend next Saturday, let’s get to the good, bad and ugly from the big Irish victory.



The Defense. A day later, the performance of Notre Dame’s defense is just as impressive. A week after looking much more susceptible than we ever expected, the Irish were completely locked in (at least for 58 minutes and change) as they turned Georgia Tech’s well-oiled machine into a mistake-prone unit that lost its composure.

“I thought right from the start we kind of got rattled a little bit,” Paul Johnson conceded after the game. “When it wasn’t going good at first, we didn’t respond very well.

“I think you have to give Notre Dame some credit. They had something to do with that.”

A season after leading college football in third down conversion rate, Georgia Tech started 0 for 9 on 3rd down, and finished the game just three of 15. Entering the game without a three-and-out on the season, Notre Dame forced two straight to open the game.

Even more important, after starting the season 12-of-12 with a ridiculous 12 touchdowns in the red zone, Paul Johnson’s team got nothing on its first red zone appearance, scoring just twice in four appearances.

Notre Dame’s athleticism in the front seven matched Georgia Tech’s, with Joe Schmidt phenomenal from his middle linebacker spot. The schematic tweaks the Irish utilized paid immediate dividends, as Greer Martini stepped into the starting lineup and made eight tackles at outside linebacker.

Keeping Max Redfield on the sideline was a bold move, but it paid off, as Drue Tranquill put together an impressive first half working the alleys before his season was ended just before halftime. And when Matthias Farley was called into action after Tranquill went down, Farley immediately made a big play, forcing a fumble and holding his own with four tackles.

Best of all, it was finally revealed that there wasn’t just some “solution” for the option. Notre Dame’s defense succeeded by being aggressive, being multiple, and continually making changes, varying three and four-man fronts, one and two-high safeties, with the only constant aggression. And after five years of looking for a solution to the option, Kelly and company seem to have found their firmest grasp on it yet.


The SWAG team.

Nothing better illustrates Notre Dame’s commitment to stopping the triple-option than the SWAG team. Assembled in training camp and utilized on a near daily basis to give the starting defense consistent work against an option opponent, the SWAG team is a specialized unit comprised of walk-ons, scholarship players and scout teamers whose sole job was running Georgia Tech and Navy’s triple option.

“I’d be remiss without mentioning our swag team,” Kelly said. “That is our triple option team. They named themselves swag. It’s been kind of this thing that’s gone on since camp started. They wanted their own identity. They did such a great job preparing our defense.”

According to Kelly, SWAG stands for Students With Attitude and Game. But fancy wordplay aside, “swag” is a shortened version of swagger, and how kids these days talk about confidence, uniqueness and style.

That isn’t usually how you’d describe a group of freshmen, walk-ons and career back-ups whose job it is to get knocked around by the starting defense on a daily basis.

“The Swag team does an incredible job week in and week out. And I think they just have complete buy in,” captain Matthias Farley said after the game. “There’s guys on that team who are on scholarship and are very talented, fast and dynamic. When you have guys like that giving you a great look, they’re not down, they’re busting their tails and that gives us an incredible look.”



Notre Dame’s coaching staff. It had to feel pretty good inside the coaches’ room on Saturday evening. With just about every national pundit picking Georgia Tech to win, the self-belief in the locker room was instilled by the staff this week and carried onto the field by the players.

Notre Dame’s game plan for slowing down Georgia Tech was nine months in the making. And a continual approach to facing off with the option as opposed to one week of focus is now the way you should expect Kelly and company to move forward.

“For me personally and moving forward as we see that the option is going to be something that we see each and every year, I wanted something that definitely could be duplicated and replicated from year-to-year,” Kelly explained on Sunday.

“The way we play it, you know, is something that I want to continue to do, and we don’t have to have such a huge adjustment each year with our defensive football team. I think we may have found the right kind of balance with the way we’re teaching our kids.”

The Irish aren’t in the clear yet, especially considering Keenan Reynolds is every bit as dangerous as Justin Thomas. But this game meant something, and there was no hiding that.

We already knew about the Brian VanGorder-Paul Johnson subplot. Now add to it this little tidbit, revealed by Eric Hansen and Al Lesar in the South Bend Tribune, and it likely tasted even a little bit sweeter.

There’s a reason that Brian Kelly called this game a “program win.” I think it’s probably the most impressive regular-season victory of his time in South Bend, considering what the option did to him early in his tenure, the injuries that have accumulated and being forced to start DeShone Kizer for the first time.





Turnovers and Mistakes. Probably the most impressive thing about Saturday’s win was the fact that the Irish weren’t perfect. DeShone Kizer’s ill-advised throw to Corey Robinson was the product of a bad read by Kizer, who missed bracket coverage that forced Robinson to convert his route. It took points off the board.

Freshman tight end Alize Jones did his best to test the blood pressure of his head coach when he coughed up the football in the final minute of the first half. The defense bailed him out. And kicker Justin Yoon was shaky again, clanging one extra point off the upright and missing another completely. But Kelly sent him right back out there after halftime, and Yoon converted the kick.

Kizer, Jones and Yoon are all doing this for the first time, thrown into the deep end as the Irish have won three games against Power 5 conference opponents. So credit goes to the Irish for overcoming their mistakes and still winning the game.

The last two minutes.

With the majority of the working press bundled on the sidelines, Georgia Tech made the game interesting. Too interesting. With just a victory formation left, the Irish couldn’t get the ball back, allowing Tech to march down the field and score a touchdown, then follow it up with another score.

It didn’t get close. But it certainly got a little uncomfortable. And while Torii Hunter recovered the onside kick to end things, it took a little too long to do so.



Drue Tranquill’s knee. You can’t help but feel horrible for Tranquill, who tore his right ACL celebrating a pass breakup before half time, his second major knee injury in as many seasons.

Tranquill was a key piece of the option package, and his loss will be felt against Navy. He’s also a piece of important depth at safety, where the Irish will be looking for considerable answers.

Five things we learned: Notre Dame 30, Georgia Tech 22

Will Fuller, C.J. Prosise

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Notre Dame’s defense pulled off a magic trick. In broad daylight, with 80,000 fans watching intently, Brian VanGorder’s defense took the power out of Georgia Tech’s triple-option attack.

The Irish moved to 3-0 on the season, beating the Yellow Jackets 30-22, a game that only got close after Notre Dame’s players started planning how to best use their 24-hour celebration window. Kicking off the game as home underdogs a week after escaping Charlottesville with a last-second victory, Brian Kelly’s team made a very loud statement on Saturday afternoon, winning with a first-time starting quarterback, a significant (and growing) body count, and by conquering a offense that had torched just about everyone it had faced.

“It was a program win today,” Kelly said in his postgame comments. “You can sustain some injuries, some key injuries, and still play at a high level. I think that’s what is for me most revealing.”

Powering their way through one of the schedule’s toughest games, Notre Dame moves to 3-0, thanks to a complete team performance. Let’s find out what else we learned.

Hat’s off to Brian VanGorder and company. All that work studying the option paid off. 

There probably wasn’t a happier man in Notre Dame Stadium than Brian VanGorder. The second-year Irish defensive coordinator slayed the dragon on Saturday afternoon, with his defense dominating George Tech’s triple-option attack.

After putting up video game numbers against Alcorn State and Tulane, Paul Johnson’s offense came to South Bend and got shut down. Notre Dame’s front seven pummeled Georgia Tech’s front, aggressively attacked quarterback Justin Thomas, and dominated third down.

“I think our defensive plan was outstanding,” Kelly said. “I think our team executed it up until maybe the last couple of minutes where we probably lost a little bit of our focus. But all in all, just a tremendous performance by our football team.”

Joe Schmidt paced the Irish will ten tackles. A reconfigured starting lineup, with Drue Tranquill taking Max Redfield off the field, Jerry Tillery starting at nose guard, and Greer Martini starting over James Onwualu, pushed the Irish into a larger, more physical unit. It’s also a group that took the challenge of Justin Thomas and the Yellow Jacket’s offense head on.

“We wanted to be very aggressive. I think we were probably as aggressive as any defense that we had watched on film,” Kelly said. “Being very aggressive was an important element within the plan itself.”

That aggression likely contributed to a nightmarish start for Tech, with Paul Johnson forced to burn two early timeouts. It also made things tough on Thomas, who only gained 29 yards on 10 rushing attempts and completed just three of 12 passes. Outside of a four-play, 80-yard touchdown drive, the Irish went toe-to-toe with Georgia Tech and won a fist fight.

And that’s a victory that this coaching staff should cherish.


In his first start, DeShone Kizer did his job well enough to win. 

Quarterback DeShone Kizer was not the story on Saturday afternoon. And that’s a very, very good thing. Kizer did a very nice job piloting the Irish offense, completing 20 of 28 passes for 238 yards, including hitting Will Fuller for a 46-yard touchdown pass.

And while he threw the Irish’s first interception of the season, Kizer executed the game plan designed for him and didn’t allow Georgia Tech’s pressure schemes to derail the offense.

“I thought he did great. He did exactly what we expected him to do,” captain Nick Martin said after the game. “He’s a very poised and intelligent quarterback. He did his job.”

Kizer talked about that job, speaking candidly after the game about the game plan  the coaches installed, and how Kelly, associate head coach Mike Denbrock and offensive coordinator Mike Sanford made things easy on him.

“It was a very safe game plan. There wasn’t much that Georgia Tech could do that we didn’t have an answer for,” Kizer said after the game. “We had a really safe game plan and obviously that was great for me in my first start to be completely comfortable and ready for anything they could throw at me.

Kizer made a rookie mistake, locking on Corey Robinson in the red zone and throwing a bad interception. But he shook it off, owned the mistake and moved on to the next play.

“What I liked about him is he immediately takes ownership. He’s not a guy that’s looking to say, ‘Well, it’s his fault,’ or, ‘I didn’t know this,'” Kelly said. “I love the way he is able to move on and process it and get back to playing the game.”


C.J. Prosise is not just settling into a starting job, he’s producing at a historic pace. 

Earlier this week, Blue & Gold Illustrated’s Lou Somogyi mentioned that C.J. Prosise’s 253 yards were the most of any Irish running back in the season’s first two games in over 50 years.

And that was before he ran for 198 yards and three touchdowns.

Prosise broke the game open on Saturday, his 91-yard touchdown run the longest ever in Notre Dame Stadium. It was the type of knockout punch Irish fans hoped Prosise could deliver, especially after watching him lead the Irish in yards per catch last season and look promising in spring practice when he was still moonlighting at the position.

Prosise is learning on the job, a scary though considering how quickly he is piling up yards. And with 22 carries, he’s also earning Kelly’s trust, with the Irish head coach leaning on the senior to carry the offense down the stretch.

Notre Dame ran for 215 yards, very nearly topping Georgia Tech, who the Irish held to 216 yards on the ground. And behind a strong performance by the Irish offensive line, Prosise is on pace for a monster season.


Another week, another game-breaking performance by Will Fuller. 

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: Will Fuller torched another secondary. Notre Dame’s junior receiver is a touchdown scoring machine.

Fuller scored for the fifth time this season in the first quarter, inexplicably getting behind the Yellow Jackets secondary and sprinting into the south end zone. He very nearly scored again, taking a quick screen and zig-zagging his way through the Georgia Tech defense for a big gain, his first big play in the screen game.

Even as he becomes one of the nation’s most prolific pass catchers, Fuller is still finding a way to beat opponents. And that’s after they’ve probably game-planned for the junior all week.

“He’s just an unbelievable player,” Martin said after the game. “He’s so fast and when you see the ball is thrown to him, you know the play is about to be made.”

Fuller had his first drop of the season, costing the Irish a third-down conversion. But his six catches for 131 yards makes that three-straight games going over 100 yards, with Fuller now having scored 20 touchdowns in his last 16 games.

That’s incredible.


Brian Kelly’s game plan tells you everything you need to know about this football team. 

First-time starter at quarterback. A defense that just gave up 27 points to Virginia. And an opponent that could’ve forced scoreboard operators to make room for a third-digit. You couldn’t have blamed Kelly if he managed the game hoping to avoid risk.

Instead, Notre Dame’s head coach went the opposite direction. An all-out defensive attack on the triple-option. Using his timeouts on defense to keep the clock alive. And never blinking when things didn’t go as planned.

This was a football game that could’ve been lost. Red zone interceptions likely had fans wondering if the sky was falling. Justin Yoon clanked one extra point off the upright and missed another. The clock-saving measures back-fired when freshman Alizé Jones coughed up the football giving Georgia Tech another shot to score.  And the devastating knee injury to Drue Tranquill, robbed the Irish a key element in their defensive game plan.

But the Irish didn’t panic. That’s not Kelly, nor is that this football team. Even as Notre Dame likely exits Saturday with their season-ending injury list growing to a half-dozen, the mental strength of this football team and the depth that Kelly has accumulated has turned this group into one that has the ingredients to be special.

There are no statues resurrected for a strong first quarter of the season. And the 2014 edition of the Irish were halfway to an undefeated regular season when the bottom fell out.

But the resolve of the head coach was matched by that of his players. And after the game, linebacker Joe Schmidt said it best when he talked about what it means to him to be playing with this group.

“I’m so proud. I love being a member of this defense. I love being a member of this football team. Before this football game, you look in the next guy’s eye and you know that he’s going to fight for you…It’s a powerful thing, and I’m proud of each guy on this team and I love just being a member of this team.”




Where to watch: Notre Dame vs. Georgia Tech

Jaylon Smith, Tyrone Swoopes

If you’re unable to park in front of the television this afternoon, but still want to watch Notre Dame take on Georgia Tech, we’ve got you covered.

You can live-stream the game here.

You can also watch the game on the NBC Sports Live Extra app, which had over 56,000 unique viewers during the Texas broadcast and over 2.8 million minutes of HD-streaming coverage. We’ll be back after the game with our customary Five Things, but just in case you’re on the move this afternoon, you can still watch the Irish.