Duke Ejiofor, DeShone Kizer

The good, the bad, the ugly: Notre Dame vs. Wake Forest


Notre Dame is 9-1. That’s the main bullet point that follows up a fairly unmemorable performance that saw the Irish win with ease, even if they were statistically held at bay by Wake Forest.

But in a month critical for the Irish’s postseason fate, Notre Dame keeps chugging along. Winning games and playing better defense after a late-game lapse against Pittsburgh killed some forward momentum.

With a special weekend in Fenway Park up next, the Irish can spend the week preparing to face one of the best statistical defenses in the country. But before we turn the page, let’s recap Notre Dame’s 28-7 Senior Day victory as we go over the good, bad and ugly.



Josh Adams‘ explosiveness. Throw away the stat sheet. It wasn’t an easy day at the office for freshman Josh Adams. He took some big hits. He ran tentatively at times. And the Irish missed C.J. Prosise in the short passing game.

But nobody will remember the ten touches that Adams had that resulted in gains of one yard or less. Not when Adams broke loose for a 98-yard touchdown run, all but icing the game when he extending Notre Dame’s lead to 21-points just two plays after Wake Forest nearly cut the lead to seven.

“Obviously, the run was one for the highlight reel,” Kelly said postgame.  “But he is a young man that runs tough, physical, between the tackles, and has size, strength and speed. He’s got all those things, and he’s only going to get better. It’s nice to see a true freshman out there competing at that level.”


Getting Healthy. Nobody wants to say it this bluntly, but Notre Dame didn’t seem too worried about losing to Wake Forest. They held back C.J. Prosise, who could’ve played. They rested defensive tackle Daniel Cage and tight end Nic Weishar, both unknown injuries who were also in the concussion protocol.

If there was a big worry for this week, it was James Onwualu’s knee. On Sunday, Brian Kelly gave good news, saying no knee surgery would be needed, though Onwualu won’t be available against Boston College and his return for Stanford is in question.

While Equanimeous St. Brown‘s shoulder injury will require surgery, Kelly expects Prosise, Cage and Weishar to be back next week.

“I’d say probable on all of the concussion guys. Onwualu will be out. He’s got a second-degree MCL. That’s really it,” Kelly said. “We don’t have anybody else that showed any injuries that would put them in any other kind of position from the game.”

Boston College is another flawed football team, though one with a great defense. It’s also yet another opponent with an extended week to prepare for Notre Dame. So having everybody back before heading to Stanford is a good thing.


The “high-leverage” defense. Notre Dame’s defense played really well on Saturday, holding Wake Forest to just seven points, only earned after a dubious roughing the snapper call. And even if the Demon Deacons outgained Notre Dame by putting up 340 total yards, it was refreshing to see the Irish defense stiffen when the going got tough—not necessarily how it’s gone this season.

Jaylon Smith made 14 tackles, and was in excellent coverage on a fourth down stop. Joe Schmidt was active, notching 10 tackles after staying mostly off the stat sheet the past few weeks.

The Irish were able to be productive because they were making big plays. Romeo Okwara’s three sacks were all important, including a highlight reel acrobatic play. Sheldon Day added two more TFLs. Schmidt came through unblocked on multiple blitzes, never getting home but always putting a hit on the quarterback. Smith blitzed a few times as well, getting to the quarterback, and then screaming off the edge on the game’s critical fourth down stop.

It wasn’t all perfect, but the mistakes didn’t lead to points. That was likely because Wake Forest’s offense is one of the least productive units in the country. But it’s a step forward nonetheless, holding an opponent below their average and ending a 20-points allowed streak that had gone on since week two.


Quick Hits: 

His passing numbers probably take him out of the most ridiculous “Heisman conversation inclusion” I can remember, but DeShone Kizer didn’t throw any interceptions, stayed away from the big mistake, and scored two more rushing touchdowns. (Bonus points for Kizer running over a Wake Forest DB.)

Good job, Chase Hounshell. You got your first career catch. (But miss any more blocks and nobody will remember it.)

You’ve got to think Andrew Trumbetti will remember that gift-wrapped touchdown for a long time.

It was very great to see Jarrett Grace out there running around and making plays. His two tackles came on an emotional day for Grace’s family and the entire senior class.

I liked the physicality of both Elijah Shumate and Max Redfield. Both were active in run support and seemed to play clean in coverage as well.



Every other run but the 98-yarder. Notre Dame’s offensive line lost way too many one-on-one matchups for my liking. Wake Forest has talented linebackers and Dave Clawson and defensive coordinator Mike Elko added their share of tricks up front, but too often Notre Dame’s offensive line just lost battles up front.

We saw it from Steve Elmer (again). We saw Quenton Nelson get beat. And we also saw DeShone Kizer struggle to get the Irish in the right protections, spending too much time counterpunching at the line of scrimmage.

There’s no question the Irish offensive line is battling their share of injuries, with Nick Martin and Nelson still playing through ankle injuries and other issues likely kept off the radar. But Wake Forest was able to dominate the time of possession battle because the Irish couldn’t stay on the field. And that’s because Wake challenged the Irish to a run-game matchup with even numbers and, minus one very important play, won the battle.


Winning in “uncomfortably comfortable” fashion. Nobody’s opinion but the Playoff Committee matters. But you wouldn’t have been alone if you got frustrated listening to the talking heads and television analysts last night arguing about the horse race for the four playoff spots.

Yesterday was far from an impressive Saturday for most playoff contenders. Throw away Alabama’s decisive victory over a really terrible (offensively, at least) Mississippi State team and it was a survive and advance weekend.

No. 1 Clemson was in a dogfight with Syracuse before pulling away and winning by 10. Ohio State looked just okay with J.T. Barrett at quarterback, too, beating Illinois 28-3. Iowa is proving to be just a little bit better than every average team it plays, still undefeated by surviving Minnesota. And Oklahoma State needed help from the replay booth and a huge late-game rally to beat a three-win Iowa State team.


Oklahoma won a big game, beating Baylor in the rain. And some thought that was enough for the Sooners to ascend into the driver’s seat for the No. 4 hole. But can the committee forget that Oklahoma lost to a Texas team that hasn’t beaten anybody else and lost to Notre Dame by five touchdowns?

Who knows. And quite seriously, who cares.

None of it matters until early December. But with two of the easiest games on the schedule both this week and next, it would help if the Irish did more than put up a season-low for yardage and won both games with style.

This wasn’t a tough victory, a three-score lead for just about 40 minutes. But next weekend against a Boston College team who will be looking at Notre Dame’s home game inside Fenway Park as their Super Bowl and bowl game all wrapped into one? It’d be great to win another not-close one.



What’s ugly about a victory on Senior Day? (Nothing.) This senior class won 21 home games, tied for the best four-year total in Notre Dame history. The critics will scour the record books, trying to punch holes in the personnel, opponents or competition, and still find a way to say that Lou or Ara wouldn’t have lost to Louisville or Northwestern.

But it’s not 1988 anymore. There’s cell phones, the internet, and college football played at a different level all across the country.

So even if they haven’t won a national championship or a major bowl game, this class has done something very special. Add to that the fact that Notre Dame’s seniors haven’t allowed this football team to blink even as they’ve lost key cog after key cog.

That means something. And a final home win—even if the play on the field wasn’t memorable—will last for a lifetime, the only important part being an easy victory and a great celebration.

Five things we learned: Notre Dame 28, Wake Forest 7


For Notre Dame’s 2015 team, there will be victories that are remembered. And then there will be wins like Notre Dame’s 28-7 victory over Wake Forest.

On Senior Day, an emotional Irish team took the field after 27 seniors hugged mom and dad and came to grips with the fact that this might be the last time they play football in Notre Dame Stadium. Then they went out and won an ugly, never-in-doubt football game against a Demon Deacon team that dominated the time of possession, but couldn’t manage to get in the end zone more than once.

Notre Dame moved to 9-1 on the season, a victory that can’t be called dominant but certainly was never in question. So while talk of “style points” weren’t necessarily answered, Notre Dame managed to hand Wake Forest their second-most lopsided loss of the season—giving up points only after a Deacs drive was kept alive on a phantom roughing the snapper call.

With Romeo Okwara and Jaylon Smith leading the defense and freshman Josh Adams supplying the biggest play of the game—a 98-yard touchdown run that’s the longest in the history of Notre Dame Stadium—the Irish will  celebrate Senior Day in style.

Let’s find out what we learned.


Wake Forest kept the ball from Notre Dame’s offense and controlled the clock. But they still lost by three scores. 

Notre Dame’s high-powered offense suffered through a power outage on Saturday. The Irish managed just 282 yards of total offense, a number that looks even less potent when you take away Adams’ 98-yard touchdown run.

But Brian VanGorder’s defense stepped up when it mattered most, holding down the fort and even supplying a score of their own to help the cause.

No, the big plays didn’t disappear. Wake Forest made a few in the passing game and had success on the ground as well. But in the red zone the Irish defense held strong, holding the Demon Deacons to just one score on four attempts, turning the game on its head with a critical 4th-and-goal stop that turned into a game-changing score just two plays later.

Dave Clawson’s gameplan worked to perfection, keeping the ball out of Notre Dame’s hands and holding them to a season-low 49 plays. But Wake Forest could get points out of their possessions, and staying clean in the turnover column helped turn a white-knuckle offensive performance into a comfortable victory.


Romeo Okwara is emerging as the pass rusher Notre Dame desperately needs. 

Romeo Okwara’s recent run has given Notre Dame an unexpected edge rusher. The senior added three sacks to his season total, jumping to nine on the year as he disrupted Wake Forest’s passing attack almost single-handedly. That’s the type of season-long production Notre Dame fans could only hope for, and Okwara has done it with three games still to play.

With Daniel Cage unable to go on Saturday, the Irish defense shifted Isaac Rochell inside to play tackle and mixed and matched the best they could. That forced Okwara to play more snaps, with Andrew Trumbetti opposite Okwara along with seldom-used reserves Doug Randolph and Grant Blankenship.

The rushing defense seemed to suffer—we saw Trumbetti crash hard and miss his assignment on a big zone-read gainer, with other run fits slightly off. But the pass rush never slowed, Okwara picking up the slack with a hat trick a week after notching two sacks. (He nearly had his hands on a fourth sack, but committed a facemask penalty that was mistakenly called on sophomore Jonathan Bonner.)

Okwara seems to be turning into the football player many expected when he hit campus as a 17-year old freshman, all raw tools and still figuring out the game. While roster deficiencies at defensive end and outside linebacker made it impossible for Okwara to redshirt, Brian VanGorder is getting the type of play he desperately needs in this scheme, taking some pressure off Sheldon Day as well.

“It’s one of those things where he came onto campus as a 17-year-old that just really was a raw player,” Kelly said. “He’s grown in a very short period of time this year into the kind of football player that I think has a huge growth potential in front of him. We’re just seeing that maturation process kind of come together.”


He’s still a freshman, but Josh Adams is another big play weapon for Notre Dame. 

Backed up next to their goal line and needing a DeShone Kizer sneak just for breathing room, Josh Adams broke the game open. The true freshman burst off the right side, high-stepped out of a tackle and unleashed a stiff arm Earl Campbell would’ve been proud off, setting a stadium record and essentially winning the game as he pushed the Irish lead to three scores before halftime.

What was amazing about Adams’ 98-yard run was  that it could’ve easily been 140 yards—he was running away from everybody, his blockers included, as the freshman showed the type of top-end speed that has the Irish coaching staff believing they have their next great game-breaker at the position.

Both Adams and Prosise have broken 90+ yard touchdown runs this season. While the senior sat out for precautionary measures, Adams ran for 141 yards on 17 carries, his long run buoying a yardage total that didn’t tell the story of how tough the sledding was inside the tackles.

Setting aside the struggles Notre Dame’s offensive line had, it’s worth marveling at how different the Irish backfield looks. Not just from what was expected this year—Tarean Folston and Greg Bryant, with Prosise getting a chance to contribute—but compared to the personnel that was here when Brian Kelly showed up.

In 2010, Cierre Wood broke a 39-yard run against Western Michigan. It was Notre Dame’s longest run since Robert Hughes went 46-yards in 2007. Since then, the Irish have made incremental progress.

Jonas Gray supplied a big play in his 79-yard score against Pitt in 2011, and George Atkinson had home run potential. But the biggest difference between this backfield and any in the last decade is the pure potential to go the distance on every touch.

Prosise has showed that by making big play after big play. Adams helped keep that going, his 141 yards keeping him at an astonishing 7.8 yards per carry.


James Onwualu may have suffered a significant knee injury. How Greer Martini and the Irish defense fill that hole remains to be seen. 

Junior linebacker James Onwualu suffered a significant knee injury early in the game, with an MRI coming tomorrow to determine the severity of it. The third starter in a linebacking corps that usually only mentions Joe Schmidt and Jaylon Smith, Onwualu is still a key cog to the defense, especially with a nickel grouping still figuring itself out.

Filling in capably was Greer Martini. Martini made four tackles and also filled Onwualu’s role stretched out to the hashmark, forced to play in a cover scheme that doesn’t necessarily play to the 245-pounder’s skillset.

While Boston College is a perfect game to play with a jumbo-sized SAM linebacker, Onwualu serves as a Swiss-Army backer, capable in coverage and getting better each week in the trenches. He had an early TFL in his only stop before he knee bent backwards with what Kelly deemed a potential MCL injury.

Notre Dame’s had decent injury luck of late, though the defense looked and played differently without Cage in the middle. We saw how little the margin for error is up front with Cage out. The secondary is already a high-wire act. So digging into the linebacker depth chart this week for answers is the next thing to figure out.



Seniors leave Notre Dame Stadium a much more dangerous place to play. 

Let’s tip our cap to the seniors. A class not many had high expectations for ended 2015 6-0 in Notre Dame Stadium, the 21st win for the group that matches the record set by the class of 1990 and 1991. (I’m not sure if you were following the Irish back then, but those teams were pretty good.)

That’s probably the best measurement of what this class did. And it was certainly something Brian Kelly appreciated, taking over a program that had become a pretty easy place for opponents to win.

“It’s always great to get a win for your seniors in their last home game,” Kelly said after the game. “They certainly have left a great legacy here at Notre Dame, with 21 wins… no senior class has ever won more games at home.”

The years before Sheldon Day and company got to South Bend, the Irish struggled at home. In 2011, they loss a mind-melting opener to USF. They also laid an egg against USC in their first night game in decades. The 2010 team lost to Michigan, Stanford and Tulsa at home. Charlie Weis faired no better. His final 2009 season saw him lose to USC, Navy and UConn at home. In 2008, they lost to Pitt and a nightmarish game to Syracuse.

But Kelly’s 2012 team went unbeaten at home. In 2013, only No. 14 Oklahoma beat the Irish. Northwestern and Louisville sullied the last month of the 2014 season, but this group rallied to defend their turf, finishing they home record with just three losses and two undefeated seasons in South Bend.

Night games. FieldTurf. Piped-in music. Kelly made it clear he thought all would help the Irish win more. And thanks to this 2015 class, he’s been proven correct.


Prosise out, Adams in (and more game-time updates)


With C.J. Prosise out of uniform in warmups, NBC’s Liam McHugh confirmed the news that the Irish will start freshman Josh Adams in the back field. Prosise may be an emergency option, but consider him out this afternoon on Senior Day.

Pete Sampson of Irish Illustrated also noted during warmups that the Irish were without sophomore nose guard Daniel Cage and tight end Nic Weishar. After injuring his shoulder this week during practice, Equanimeous St. Brown is also watching from the sidelines.

With Senior Day festivities just around the corner and the pregame show on NBC before a 12:30 broadcast, here are two special features from our digital team to take you into what will likely be a special Saturday in Notre Dame Stadium.



Pregame Six Pack: Another tough goodbye


Notre Dame will recognize the accomplishments of 27 seniors and graduate students on Saturday, the final home game for a group that has won a lot of games. Sitting at 37-11 since the recruiting class of 2012 arrived on campus, winning three more games this season will mean this group averaged 10 wins a season—no small feat.

When asked about this group’s legacy, Brian Kelly acknowledged the foundation they built, especially turning Notre Dame Stadium into a dominant home-field advantage.

“They can feel proud of a solid foundation and consistency of winning,” Kelly said Thursday evening.

That accomplishment is impressive, especially when you dig deeper into this group. Set aside the graduate students. The 2012 recruiting class still managed to pack a punch, especially considering the star-crossed group that emerged.

The Irish signed only 17 players on that first Wednesday in February of 2012, the biggest news the fax that never came, when four-star receiver Deontay Greenberry picked Houston over Notre Dame. So while the cornerstones of the No. 4 team in the country reside in this group, it’s also easily the most star-crossed recruiting class that Kelly signed.

Five of the 17 signees are gone. Transferred away are wide receivers Justin Ferguson and Davonte Neal. Running back Will Mahone exited Notre Dame after an off-field incident in his hometown. Crown jewels of the class, cornerback Tee Shepard and quarterback Gunner Kiel, never played a down for the Irish.

But 12 remain, and along with a handful of walk-ons and graduate students, they’ll be celebrated on Saturday. And rightfully so. In a game that should likely allow the benches to empty if Notre Dame handles their business, it could be a special day in South Bend.

So let’s get on to the Six Pack.


C.J. Prosise practiced Thursday. But if you’re playing hunches, expect to see Josh Adams in the starting lineup. 

Senior running back C.J. Prosise was back on the field today, taking part in football activities for the first time since leaving the Pitt game in the first half. And while he’s making progress in his return to the field, Kelly said Prosise’s status is still up in the air.

“We still haven’t made a decision,” Kelly said, while acknowledging that Prosise is still in the concussion protocol. “But he had a good day today…It’s not my decision to make really. It’s still in the hands of the doctors. But he looked good to me.”

For anybody that’s followed Kelly’s injury updates over the past few years, this seems like a dead giveaway that Prosise will only be available in an emergency situation, one that doesn’t necessarily exist this weekend.

So Josh Adams will likely carry the load this weekend, the freshman taking over for the senior who deserves a hug from mom and dad… and then a weekend off. We’ll also see fellow freshman Dexter Williams, who Kelly said had a nice week of practice.


Will Fuller may have declared his intention to return for his senior season. But that doesn’t mean Brian Kelly won’t go through the process with him. 

Wednesday’s big news that Will Fuller planned to return for his senior season sent shockwaves through the college football world. But Brian Kelly’s response was more measured.

Kelly has seen seniors return (Te’o, Eifert, Floyd and Martin) and seen them go (Rudolph, Tuitt and Niklas). But you can’t help but think the head coach learned from his offseason work last year with Ronnie Stanley and Sheldon Day, two seniors that evaluated the pros and cons and both ended up back in South Bend.

So while Fuller sounded emphatic that he’ll be terrorizing defensive backs in South Bend for another season, Kelly sounded like a coach who wasn’t taking any chances with any of his veterans with the option to head to the NFL after this year.

“I’ve told all the guys I’ll sit down with them. I’ve put together folders for each one of these guys and obviously each one of these kids have different circumstances and as to why they would come back or entertain looking at the draft,” Kelly explained. “I think Will’s got some factors we have to talk about relative to staying or going that I need to communicate with him. I’d love to see him come back, but we’ve got to see where it all shakes out at the end of the year.”

Not quite the reaction you were looking for? Me neither. But Kelly was quick to square things away after his initial comments.

“I don’t want to make it sound like I don’t want him back. Very pleased to have him back,” Kelly said with a large grin. “It’s just important that each one of these guys go through the process.”

Kelly’s message isn’t just for Fuller. But likely for Jaylon Smith, KeiVarae Russell and C.J. Prosise, three guys who could go either way.


Let’s tip a cap to one of the more impressive seniors in recent memory: Jarrett Grace. 

It’ll be an emotional day at Notre Dame Stadium for Jarrett Grace and his family. The senior linebacker is in all likelihood playing his final college football game (a petition for a sixth year is still up in the air). And while these five seasons haven’t gone the way he planned them, the one-time heir to Manti Te’o’s inside linebacker job has much to be proud of, especially making it all the way back from a devastating leg injury that required multiple surgeries.

“To even be able to make it back was really my goal,” Grace said. “I didn’t know if I could play at all. I didn’t know how my body was going hold up and if I would be able to play in every single game.

“I have been able to contribute and I am more than happy with that. I am preparing each and every week…. I have embraced it and enjoyed every second of it.”

Grace joined the Jack Swarbrick radio show, and Swarbrick and his co-host, linebacker Joe Schmidt, had a tremendous conversation. Schmidt and Grace, two very close friends, talk about basically everything—and what you can’t help but take away is how much they love Notre Dame, and how great they are as shining examples of the university’s student-athletes.


The difficult task of slowing down Notre Dame’s offense just got tougher for the Demon Deacons. 

Already a 27-point underdog, Wake Forest didn’t need any additional handicaps. Yet Josh Banks, the Demon Deacon’s top defensive tackle, was suspended for the final three games of the season this week, taking one of the defense’s most important players off the field this weekend.

Wake Forest head coach Dave Clawson wasn’t clear about the issue, only stating that Banks violated team rules.

“I am disappointed this has occured,” Clawson said in a statement. “Hopefully this becomes a teachable moment for Josh and the other players in our program who will  benefit  in the long run.

That turns his job over to a redshirt freshman, with Willie Yarbary stepping into the lineup. And while the strength of Dave Clawson’s roster is a front seven that features some of the best linebackers in the ACC, losing a guy who was supposed to eat up blockers and had started 21-straight games isn’t what this defense needs.


With the hype train at full steam, DeShone Kizer continues to be the calming presence this offense needs. 

DeShone Kizer… Heisman Trophy candidate?

Sounds silly, but ESPN’s Mike Wilbon went out and said it on Sportscenter Thursday, bunching Kizer with LSU’s Leonard Fournette in the front pack of the Heisman race. It may be an unofficial ballot, and isn’t anything more than a talking point, but Kizer is picking up fans everywhere he goes. College Football Playoff committee chair Jeff Long pointed out the stellar play of the young quarterback as well.

Don’t expect it to impact Kizer, though. Wonder if Kizer’s busy comparing stats as he awaits his invite to New York? Think again.

“I couldn’t tell you how many touchdowns I even have on the season. I have no idea where I’m at,” Kizer said Wednesday.

Kizer’s ability to stay in the moment will likely be tested in a different way this weekend. With the Irish understanding the benefit of a beauty pageant win, the need to be flashy could bring some unforced errors to an offense that did a nice job eradicating them against Pitt.

The young quarterback credited his position coach and offensive coordinator Mike Sanford. He also talked about the evolution of the offense. But most impressively, any wonder how he’s staying grounded can be answered by his response to the same question.

“Just watch my film. There’s way too many opportunities that I don’t come up successful that keep me down there,” Kizer said. “There are way too many mistakes that I’ve made from week to week. Last week was a pretty successful game for the offense, but there’s still a couple balls that need to be caught. There are a couple passes that were caught that were spectacular catches that should have been pitch and catches.

“I believe that as a quarterback, the only way to ground yourself is to evaluate your performance. I’m not even near where I should be, and there is still so much room to develop and so much room to get better and mature.”


Take the time and tip your cap not just to the senior class, but to the wonderful profiles written by The Observer. 

You know Sheldon Day, Ronnie Stanley, Nick Martin and Joe Schmidt. But how about Travis Allen, Josh Anderson, Eamon McOsker and Nick Ossello?

Every senior class member got a profile in The Observer, with Notre Dame’s excellent student newspaper putting together a staggering amount of work in anticipation of the final home game. Do yourself a favor and read them all.

Youcan enjoy the great profile on the decision Ronnie Stanley made to return. But you can also take the time to read about Cam Bryan, a walk-on who dreamed of going to Notre Dame, got in after being wait-listed, then taught himself how to play football after beginning his life on the gridiron on Stanford’s interhall football team—and stuck around for a graduate semester because he knew this football team was going to be good.

(That’s dedication.)

It’ll be a special Saturday in Notre Dame Stadium. And even if it’s expected to be a lopsided Senior Day, it could be a wonderful salute to a group that’s battled through quite a journey to get here—and has an important mission still to be accomplished.








Notre Dame football: Are we entering another golden era?

Notre Dame Team

Stop and look around.

It’s mid-November. Notre Dame—for the second time in four seasons—is in the thick of a national title hunt. And the Irish are doing it without their starting quarterback, running back, tight end, defensive tackle—well, you’ve heard about the injuries since early September.

For as excited as Notre Dame’s locker room was when they saw their No. 4 ranking on Tuesday night, the hoorays are more muted around ND Nation. Is this becoming old hat? Are people waiting for the next banana peel?

Noted philosopher Ferris Bueller warned that life moves pretty fast. Well so did this football season. And with another Senior Day upon us, the wrecking ball hits Notre Dame Stadium come Sunday, and all that stands between the Irish and a College Football Playoff spot* are an iconic trip to Fenway Park and a mega-showdown at Stanford on Thanksgiving weekend.

*Yes, I know there’s more to it than that. But this is all the Irish can control.  

But taking a moment to look beyond the next few weeks, we could be in the middle of something quite special. Because 2015 sure doesn’t feel like just a blip on the radar. It looks like the beginning of a serious run, a Notre Dame program built not just for the short-term, but stacked with talent that should allow the Irish to reload year after year.

Will Fuller‘s announcement that he’ll return for his senior season assures college football that Notre Dame will once again have one of the nation’s most dangerous weapons sprinting behind defenses. And with a stacked running back depth chart and three starters returning on the offensive line, the ground game shouldn’t miss a step.

The quarterback depth chart has once again turned into a champagne problem. DeShone Kizer or Malik Zaire? Brandon Wimbush? Chemistry and leadership in the position room most certainly allows this to play out differently than things did with Everett Golson.

There are players that’ll be difficult to replace. Sheldon Day, probably Jaylon Smith and KeiVarae Russell, too. But the early look at the young talent on this defense should have Irish fans sleeping easy. Because there don’t seem to be many swings and misses in recent recruiting classes—no misshaped personnel to plug into a temporary roster hole like we’ve seen the past few seasons.

When Brian Kelly took over the Notre Dame football program, he was known as a program builder and turnaround specialist. While he achieved both of those things, he’s actually been far better in the second phase of his run as a the Irish head coach—elevating expectations and managing the machine.

Kelly hadn’t spent a fourth season at a school since he was a young thirtysomething coaching Grand Valley State. Yet it has been these last few seasons where he’s shown his best chops.

After twenty-plus years atop a program, he showed a willingness to tweak his on-field formula, making some bold new staff hires and schematic changes. He’s also pushed hard as the athletic department implemented some progressive off-field changes that should allow his student-athletes to both succeed on the field and do more than just survive the academic gauntlet. Study abroad programs and trips to Africa and Greece? Something tells me that’s not part of the recruiting pitch Urban Meyer or Nick Saban are selling.

On the field, a program once crippled by a lack of confidence now feels steadfast in their self-belief. Multiple opportunities to fold came and went this season, each one shrugged off by a game-changing play or clutch touchdown drive. Even in the loss to Clemson, it wasn’t for lack of belief. The Irish just ran out of time.

Kelly’s treatment of his team after that loss was called into question by some. It shouldn’t have been. Moral victories are long gone, and this team knew that, probably even more than their head coach.

As Notre Dame succeeds, familiar questions emerge. Will Kelly leave town and give chase to his supposed NFL dream? If he stays, can he hold on to his assistants, now viewed as key cogs in an operation surely looking to be replicated by the dozen schools rebooting their football programs.

Jack Swarbrick doesn’t seem worried. And Kelly doesn’t look like a guy exploring his options, either. After all, it was the head coach who brought in Showtime’s periscope, allowing documentary cameras into the nooks and crannies of a program that’s been sealed shut these past few years.

While some still don’t believe him, Kelly has been adamant that the goal for him is a national championship at Notre Dame. That means there’s work to be done before his bronze statue can be erected outside the (still growing) House that Rockne built.

But the stars are aligning. The talent is in place. Even if the lights go out on the 2015 season earlier than hoped, the future looks bright in South Bend.

The Irish look ready to go on a run.