New Mailbox

Offseason Mailbag: The ides of July

48 Comments

Long time, no mailbag. Let’s change that.

Have a question about the 2015 Irish? Or maybe about the insanity that comes with writing Irish A-to-Z? Or anything else?

Drop it below or on Twitter @KeithArnold.

Offseason Q&A: Temple

Matt Rhule
7 Comments

After a rough opening stretch to begin the season, Notre Dame takes a well deserved week off after playing USC. They return on Halloween in the City of Brotherly Love to face Temple in Lincoln Financial Stadium, where the Temple Owls await.

Last the Irish saw Temple, first-year head coach Matt Rhule was rebooting a program Steve Addazio left for Boston College and Tommy Rees was going long and throwing deep balls for touchdowns. But since then, the Owls have made steady progress, turning a game that seems to be a mismatch into one that actually deserves some attention.

To help us with that, Mike Gibson of Rant Sports and Temple Football Forever joins us. We chat about the job Rhule’s done, a defensive that might be the best one nobody’s heard of, and the hopes for an on-campus stadium.

 

At first glance, it’s really amazing the turnaround job that’s taking place at Temple under Matt Rhule. At just 40 years old, Rhule is a rising star in the profession. What’s the state of the program heading into 2015 and being one of the better teams in the AAC?

The state of the program is good as far as the talent level. All 11 starters return from the No. 4 scoring defense in the country, led by All-American Linebacker candidate Tyler Matakevich. Nobody is safe as at least three of those positions could be upgraded by newcomers (redshirts and incoming freshmen).

The coaching staff, though, is pretty inexperienced, with no guys having been a head coach anywhere. The offensive coordinator, Marcus Satterfield, is from Tennessee-Chattanooga. The defensive coordinator (Phil Snow) last coached at Eastern Michigan.

 

It’s hard to look at Temple without noticing their defense. One of the best statistical units in the country returns all 11 starters. Tyler Matakevich has had 100 tackles in each of his first three seasons — and looks like a lock to do so again in 2015. What makes him so good? And is it fair to call him the star of this Temple team?

What makes this group so good and what do you expect to see in 2015?

Yes, it is fair to call Tyler the star of this team. He’s always around the ball, a heat-seeking missile who always seems to avoid getting blocked. He’s extremely tough.

It’s more than just Matakevich. The defensive line is much more active and a pass-rushing force than it was against Notre Dame two years ago. Nate D. Smith is almost as good a LB as Matakevich and Tavon Young and Sean Chandler are outstanding cornerbacks. There are no more Anthony Robeys, who got lit up at ND two years ago.

 

It seems like the Temple offense is the counterpoint to the defense. And P.J. Walker’s struggles down the stretch last season had to be frustrating to watch. Is he the answer at quarterback? Is there another option? Or was last year just the growing pains that come with being a sophomore?

P.J. lost his comfort zone when Robbie Anderson flunked out of school (he was accepted back into school and the program in late June). Anderson is the best receiver in my opinion in Temple history and that includes Steve Watson (Denver Broncos) and Leslie Shepherd (Redskins) and Rob Streater (Raiders).

P.J. had a great year (20 touchdowns, 8 int) as a true freshman and nine of those touchdowns were to Anderson over the last 5 games. Compound that with Temple failing to devise a scheme to protect him in the pocket (no blocking backs, plenty of empty backfields) and P.J. looked shell-shocked back there at times.

Rhule promises those protection schemes will change. He is the answer at quarterback. He reminds me very much of Teddy Bridgewater. He can be that good.

 

You’ve been vocal on the need for Temple to build its own on-campus stadium. While Notre Dame coming to the Linc might actually help sell the place out, it looks like the opposite of a home field advantage. What would a stadium do for the Temple program and what’s the progress report on the quest to build one?

At the latest BOT meeting, there was no discussion (none) of a new stadium and the next meeting is July 14. I doubt they will discuss it even then. (Mike talked about the importance of yesterday’s meeting on his blog.)

I’m neutral on a stadium. I like Notre Dame and Penn State coming to Philadelphia and I don’t think that will ever happen if Temple built a 30K on-campus stadium. I think Jeff Lurie would probably lock Temple out if that happened. He’s not as civic-minded as, say, Mr. Rooney is with Pitt in Pittsburgh. The only people who are talking about it are Temple fans on message boards.

 

There will be 35K Temple fans there and 35K Notre Dame fans. It will be like an old-fashioned Big 5 basketball game at the Palestra. From 2009-2011, Temple was 14-4 at the Linc. Not a bad home record.

 

Irish A-to-Z: Tarean Folston

Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl
9 Comments

Entering 2015, there’s no denying Tarean Folston is Notre Dame’s starting running back. We can talk about C.J. Prosise’s successful spring. We can wonder when Greg Bryant is going to reach his 5-star potential. Or we can maybe just appreciate the best Irish running back since—when, Julius Jones?

Folston is coming off an impressive sophomore season, running for close to 900 yards and chipping in 190 more yards via the pass. After averaging just eight carries a game through early October, Folston took over the ground game, carrying the load the rest of the way — just like he did during his freshman season.

While there were some games where Folston disappeared, that shouldn’t be possible in 2015, with Greg Bryant reportedly suspended for four games and Prosise still likely having some pass-catching responsibilities.

So looking for a breakout star to emerge? Folston is a solid bet.

 

TAREAN FOLSTON
5’9.5″, 214 lbs.
Junior, No. 25, RB

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

Notre Dame sweat out a late visit to Auburn and Gus Malzahn applying serious pressure on Signing Day to land the four-star prospect. Folston was Florida’s 4A first-team All-State running back, a do-everything high school player.

Had offers from Oregon, Florida, Florida State and a few dozen other programs before picking Notre Dame in early January. He was an Under Armour All-American.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2013): Played in 12 games, starting two as a true freshman. Nearly set a single-game freshman rushing record when he ran for 140 yards against Navy, the most since 1999. Named Offensive Newcomer of the Year.

Sophomore Season (2014): Ran for 889 yards and caught 190 yards worth of passes as the team’s leading rusher. Averaged over 5.0 yards per carry for the second-straight season. Broke 100 yards in four out of five games, coming two yards shy against North Carolina of making it five out of six.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

If Folston would’ve gotten some more carries earlier in the season—or if Brian Kelly would’ve used Folston more—he’d have broken 1,000 yards. Funnily enough, I had his number of carries pegged exactly right, meaning that I expected more from not just the young back, but the offensive line.

It might sound silly, but I expect Folston to run for 1,000 yards, the first back to do that for the Irish since Cierre Wood in 2011. He’d need to get around 175 carries to do so, but that number seems reasonable with a more dynamic running game and saving some touches for Bryant (who could get 150 as well) with McDaniel picking up around 75.

For as excited as Irish fans are for Bryant’s breakout season, 2014 could be all about Folston, providing he stays healthy. With the Irish capable of moving at tempo and utilizing Everett Golson’s skills in the zone read, the Irish running game could become a very deadly weapon, especially with the depth to stay fresh.

Ultimately, it’ll be interesting to see what Folston’s ceiling is. He’s smooth enough to contribute as both a runner and receiver. He’s strong enough to be used around the goal line. But it’s hard to know what his ceiling is athletically, though he’s one of the most versatile football players on the Irish roster right now.

Ripping carries away from McDaniel and Bryant won’t be easy. But feeding the ball to a talented back like Folston will be too tempting, even for a head coach that loves throwing the ball around.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Folston will learn a ton from new running backs coach Autry Denson. In many ways, he’s got a lot in common with the Denson, the former player. Neither are a burner, though Folston has more than adequate speed. And there’s a smoothness to his game that didn’t exist in Denson’s, a grinder that was a max effort back that extended his career to Sundays. If that rubs off of Folston, all the better.

This is an NFL running back. He’ll need to continue making strides and eliminate the games where he goes hiding. But that’ll happen in a more run-oriented offense, especially if Folston gets off to the quick start Notre Dame will need from him.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I’m doubling down on Folston. I expect the biggest season from a running back in the Kelly era — and I’m pegging Folston for a 1,200 yard, double-digit touchdown 2015.

Part of this confidence comes from seeing what Mike Sanford did riding a running QB and top-shelf back at Boise State. The other part comes from seeing Notre Dame’s offensive line figure itself out this spring instead of mixing and matching into fall camp.

But mostly it comes from the natural talent I see with Folston, a back who’ll get better as he collects touches. There’s nobody to steal them from Folston to begin the season. And after he establishes himself, there’s nobody who should take them away from him, either.

So stay healthy and Notre Dame will have a running back to showcase.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB

Irish A-to-Z: Nicco Fertitta

Lawrence Cager, Nicco Fertitta
16 Comments

A pint-sized safety who committed to Notre Dame after camping in South Bend Las Vegas native Nicco Fertitta begins his collegiate career likely with a chip on his shoulder. It could be courtesy of a three-star ranking and some wondering what the Irish staff saw in the undersized defensive back. But more likely it’s just in the nature of the heat-seeking tackler, a pound-for-pound bruiser who seeks out big collisions, eager to prove his skeptics wrong.

Fertitta was joined in his recruiting class by high school teammate and blue-chip tight end Alizé Jones, bringing back memories of the recruitment of Manti Te’o and his tagalong teammate Robby Toma. And like that duo, Toma proved himself to be more than carry-on baggage, something Fertitta plans to do in short order, especially with some depth chart deficiencies at safety.

Let’s take a closer look at Nicco Fertitta.

 

NICCO FERTITTA
5’9″, 175 lbs.
Freshman, No. 28, DB

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

U.S. Army All-American, First-team All-State per the Las Vegas Review Journal. State champion, with Bishop Gorman also being awarded a mythical national title.

A three-star prospect, Fertitta chose Notre Dame over offers from Arizona, Hawaii, Houston, UNLV (where his prep coach Tony Sanchez took over the program) and Utah.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

There doesn’t look to be a huge growth spurt on the horizon for Fertitta, who’ll have to battle his size throughout his career. But while 5-foot-9 safeties aren’t the norm, there are plenty of undersized defensive backs making a living on Sundays, and even more serving as productive college football players.

Even if he doesn’t have the upside of a Max Redfield, Fertitta is far from a wasted scholarship. He’s a special teams candidate from Day One, and his ability to create plays—and Richter scale-level collisions—make him a guy who might not redshirt.

Ultimately, Fertitta’s speed and instincts will determine how often he plays in the Irish defense. But a natural leader and a player with moxie, he’s going to find a way to help the program while he develops as a football player.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I tend to think Fertitta is going to be one of the freshmen taking the field against Texas come September 5th. He’ll likely be covering kicks and chasing down punts, but Fertitta’s freshman season will hinge on his ability to make big plays in the game’s third phase, something Scott Booker is still looking to establish.

As a safety, Fertitta could also be very helpful in sub-packages. As Notre Dame takes on a heavy dose of run-heavy (and option) offenses in Georgia Tech, Navy, Pitt and Boston College, there’s a place for a run-stuffer with the ability to play in space, and just as Kelly and the Irish used Jamoris Slaughter, Fertitta could be an option at a position that doesn’t have a ton of flexibility.

But any road onto the field as a freshman should be considered a strong debut season for Fertitta.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB

Notre Dame will get a visit from No. 1 DT Rashan Gary

Twitter
36 Comments

Notre Dame is still looking for the next Louis Nix and Stephon Tuitt. And it looks like they’re still in the running to land a prospect who might be even more highly touted than both in 5-star defensive tackle Rashan Gary.

In the days following The Opening, Gary’s stock is sky high. And while most have wondered why Notre Dame wasn’t in the mix for the all-everything New Jersey native from Paramus Catholic, it appears that Gary will give Notre Dame a look before it’s all said and done.

Gary spoke with a few different outlets covering Notre Dame football, and he confirmed plans to get to campus, something that didn’t happen earlier this summer, when Gary visited both Michigan and Ohio State.

“I got a visit planned for Notre Dame, I just don’t have the exact date yet,” Gary told the South Bend Tribune.

Gary’s been in communication with Notre Dame’s staff and has a connection to the Irish program, facing off last season in the state title game against incoming freshman Brandon Wimbush. Gary sacked Wimbush twice, but ended up on the losing side of the title game.

Gary got another dose of Notre Dame this week going up against offensive linemen Parker Boudreaux and Tommy Kraemer. As noted by those in attendance, Boudreaux won a rep or two against Gary, a victory that didn’t go unnoticed by the 5-star prospect who left Beaverton with some serious accolades behind his name.

Now the Irish coaching staff will take to closing the gap on Jim Harbaugh, Nick Saban and Urban Meyer, imposing coaches to say the least. But according to Irish Illustrated, Notre Dame’s still chipping away at Gary—and have him sold on seeing what Notre Dame has to offer.

“They’re cool. I like them because they’re building a relationship with me and also with my family,” Gary told Jake Brown of Irish Illustrated. “We’re right now trying to schedule a visit for me coming up. They said it’s just a place you’ve got to come up and see for yourself.”

New defensive line coach Keith Gilmore was brought in to find and develop top-flight defensive linemen, just like he did at North Carolina. Any chance to make-up ground on Gary’s recruitment would need to start by getting the blue-chipper to campus.